California readies pay-as-you-drive tax test, coming soon to a road near you

By Justin Hyde : motoramic -excerpt

It won’t happen immediately, or even within the next year, but not too far into the future you might pay a tax for every mile you drive — thanks to California.

Three weeks ago, California Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law the first test of mileage-based road taxes in the Golden State. The bill, which passed the state legislature with the backing of transit agencies, environmental groups and most major automakers, creates a 15-person panel to oversee a pilot of pay-by-the-mile taxation by 2018.

The move makes California the largest state to explore how modern technology might replace the dwindling money from gasoline taxes used to build and maintain roads, thanks to ever-more efficient vehicles and less driving overall. Congress has been forced to fill the gap at the federal level with billions of dollars in temporary funding; in California, where residents pay 48.5 cents on the gallon in state gasoline taxes worth more than $3 billion a year, the state has borrowed from those revenues in recent years to cover shortfalls elsewhere… (more)

This gets into so many areas that we find repugnant. Do we want our every move tracked? Why don’t they just raise the gas tax and get it over with? People are using less gas which is what they wanted. Now they are punishing us for using less gas. There is something wrong with this plan.

Measure seeks to raise revenue for Alameda County transportation improvements

By Sierra Stalcup : dailycal – excerpt

In November, voters will decide the outcome of Measure BB, which would increase the county sales tax by 0.5 percent in order to raise revenue for Alameda County transportation improvements.

If approved, Measure BB would secure the sales tax for 30 years with revenue allocated to transportation groups such as BART and AC Transit in order to modernize and improve transportation options within the county…

Jerry Cauthen, a transportation engineering consultant and volunteer for the Bay Area Transportation Working Group, said he does not support the measure because the plan fails to set concrete, reliable goals.

Community groups supporting the measure, however, emphasize the importance of improving and expanding access to public transportation in Alameda County…

“Berkeley used Measure B money for bicycle boulevards which provide a safe crossing to a busy street,” said Dave Campbell, program director of Bike East Bay. “Even a parent with a kid feels comfortable. If cyclists think it is safer, they are more likely to ride.”… (more)

This has a familiar ring to it. Could be because it is part of the Plan Bay Area.

Postseason baseball made parking rates near AT&T Park skyrocket to $100

By Mike Oz : sports.yahoo.com – excerpt

SAN FRANCISCO — With the Giants making a run at another National League title, October baseball is all the rage here. Fans are skipping work for day games. Black-and-orange T-shirts are being hawked all over the place. And parking-garage owners are making out like bandits… (more)

Higher parking rates will drive more people into cabs.

Parking control officers in a huff over violent public, want city protection

By : sfexaminer – excerpt

photo of a San Francisco parking control officer on the hood of a moving car that went viral last month seems to have captured the mood of The City’s parking enforcement officers.

Things are so bad, the workers and their union picketed outside of the Hall of Justice on Thursday afternoon — along with nurses who work for the city — to pressure city leaders to do something. Dealing with assaults and attacks on these city workers are increasingly becoming a part of their jobs, nurses and officers say, and they want The City protect them.

Even though there is no indication that such violence has increased dramatically recently — there were only 12 reported incidents of parking control officers facing assault or battery this year, according to the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency — workers feel too little is being done… (more)

Chicago Quietly Allows .1 Second Shorter Yellow Lights, Makes $8M Off 77,000 New Tickets

By Elliot Hannon : slate – excerpt

How long is a yellow light? Most people would—reasonably—have no idea the exact length of time before a traffic light goes from yellow to red. The answer is: A minimum of three seconds, according to federal safety regulations. What happens when a mere tenth of second is shaved off that time and a yellow light lasts 2.9 seconds? If you thought, not much, you’d be wrong.

The city of Chicago and its mayor, Rahm Emanuel, are taking heat—thanks to a Chicago Tribune investigationfor ever-so-quietly sanding that measly tenth of a second off of the length of yellow lights in the city this past spring. The impact was substantial: 77,000 additional red light camera tickets were issued, at $100 a pop, which added up to nearly $8 million forked over by unsuspecting drivers.

Yellow Light Time Standards

shortyellowlights – excerpt

Legislation mandating proper yellow light times is mostly non-existent. It is one of the goals of this project to establish national standards to protect motorists.

For the purposes of this project, we have put together a general guide to appropriate yellow light durations.

This guide is intended to help identify potentially dangerous short yellow light times. Whenever possible, suspicious timings will be confirmed by a trained, objective traffic engineer.

Recommended Yellow Light Times
Three seconds should be the absolute minimum time for any intersection.

25 MPH — 3.0 Seconds
30 MPH — 3.5 Seconds
35 MPH — 4.0 Seconds
40 MPH — 4.5 Seconds
45 MPH — 5.0 Seconds
50 MPH — 5.5 Seconds
55 MPH — 6.0 Seconds

For your information, a technical explanation of the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) formula for calculating yellow light times is included below (source): … (more)

Yellow Light time standards are largely missing. Some people are calling for some new standards. This is an important issue for a number of reasons so we will post a number of articles.

RELATED:
http://www.motorists.org/red-light-cameras/yellow-lights

City Park’s Tim Leonoudakis is Featured Speaker at The National Parking Association’s 2014 Convention and Expo

parking-net – excerpt

Tim Leonoudakis, CEO of City Park, San Francisco, Cal. will address parking professionals attending the National Parking Association’s 63rd Annual Convention & Expo, on smart parking and multimodal transportation for parking operators.

Tim Leonoudakis has served as CEO of City Park since 1985, growing the family-owned business founded by his father and uncle in 1953. City Park is an industry leader in high-end, award-winning parking operations and multi-modal transportation solutions. The parking company currently manages parking operations in the San Francisco Bay Area for 25 Five-Star hotels, 6 hospitals, 20 mixed-use/commercial facilities, 16 office parking towers and Levi’s Stadium. With over 90 locations currently under contract and 900 people on staff, City Park is the largest parking operator in the San Francisco Bay Area.

A national leader in green transportation practices, City Park offers over 38 electric vehicle charging stations to the public, and leads the industry in providing commuter shuttles for Bay Area employees at Google, Apple, Twitter and Salesforce. As a result, traffic on Bay Area highways has been reduced by almost 5,000 cars per day… (more)

Golden Gate Bridge district asks Marin Airporter to vacate Larkspur site

By Mark Prado : marinij – excerpt

Bridge district ending lease to create more ferry parking

The Golden Gate Bridge district is terminating its lease with the Marin Airporter in Larkspur so it can use the site for ferry parking.

Late-morning weekday ferry trips leaving Larkspur have limited ridership because there is nowhere for people to park after commuters fill up the lot, officials said.

The bridge district’s Transportation Committee voted Thursday to give the Airporter a 180-day lease termination notice. The same approval is expected Friday from the full bridge board…

The district will collect parking revenue of up to $60,000 a year when it charges for parking at the new lot as it does in its main lot. Expanded parking will allow for more passengers and increase revenue between $300,000 to $450,000 a year… (more)

 

 

Strike called on Golden Gate Bridge bus lines for Oct. 17

By Kale Williams : sfgate – excerpt

Buses operated by the Golden Gate Transportation District will not be crossing the Bay Area’s most famous bridge next Friday as workers from the Teamsters Union Local 856 and 665, which represents dispatchers, supervisors and maintenance crews, announced a one-day strike.

The Amalgamated Transit Union, which represents drivers, is expected to honor the picket line, effectively canceling bus service between Marin, Sonoma and San Francisco for the day. Ferry service and bridge traffic will not be affected… (mari)

BART, AC Transit Directors Approve Late Night Bus Service

Expanded late night transbay bus service could begin as early as December after BART and Alameda-Contra Costa Transit directors voted to approve the service.

BART directors approved the one-year pilot program Thursday and AC Transit directors approved it Wednesday night… (more)