Despite Free Parking, San Francisco Meters Continue Collecting On Sundays

SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) — San Francisco may be raking in profits from parking meters when parking is supposed to be free.

Signage on many San Francisco parking meters still indicates Sunday enforcement, even though the city recently stopped charging for Sunday parking.

“I don’t know why they’re not saying free parking, because that’s what it is now,” one man told KPIX 5… (more)

We have been hearing about this since the Mayor and press first mentioned that parking will be free on Sundays again.

Not only did the SFMTA not change the signs, they also did not change the much touted smart meters. Many meters still flash the expired message on Sundays.

You may want to treat this like a crime and report any confusing signs and meters you see to the SFMTA so they will have a record of the complaints. There is a at least one class action lawsuit regarding confusing signs pending so the department is well aware of the signage problem.

As always, let the Supervisors know about the problem.

How a $900 parking citation became a $25,000 federal lawsuit against SF

By sfexaminer – excerpt

Two San Francisco residents, one of whom is disabled, are furious with what they see as an unjust parking ticket, and they have taken their complaint to federal court.

The lawsuit — which was served Sept. 12 to The City, San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency and one of its citation review officers, and the Police Department, its chief and the officer who issued the citation — claims the Feb. 16 parking ticket was unlawful.

Although the fine has been greatly reduced, the plaintiffs have decided to press on with their complaint… (more)

Gov. Brown Signs Clean-Air Vehicle Legislation

AP : abcnews – excerpt

Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law several bills designed to boost use of clean-air vehicles in California.

One bill signed Sunday allows 15,000 additional electric and partial zero-emissions vehicles, or 70,000 total vehicles, to get green stickers that allow driving in carpool lanes even when solo.

Another requires freeway high-occupancy toll lane operators to allow clean air vehicles to drive for free or reduced rates. Such roads exist in Orange and Riverside counties, and the San Francisco area.

Another bill requires a property owner, rather than the person leasing it, to install an electric vehicle charging station and its infrastructure in most cases.

California makes up 40 percent of the nation’s electric vehicle sales and the governor’s press office says it surpassed more than 100,000 sold earlier this month… (more)

Car manufacturers have met the new clean air standards by developing more efficient motor vehicles and the public has embraced the new technology. Changes in automotive industry standards, including increased production of electric vehicles have resulted in a faster pace of emissions reduction than anything the anti-car movement has done. Fortunately, the legislators are supporting the switch to clean energy. Now we just need to tackle the parking and traffic problems at the polls.

Vote No on A and B (No money without accountability) and Yes on L if you want to keep your car in San Francisco.

I-TEAM: NEW STUDY CONFIRMS DEADLY GUARDRAIL DANGERS

ABC 7 I-Team on Sunday News – excerpt

SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) –A new study about guardrails out this week confirms dangers raised by the ABC7 News I-Team in April 2013. They can malfunction, sometimes causing injury and even death. “20/20″ explores the issue on ABC7 Friday at 10 p.m.

We aren’t talking about when a car bumps into the main part of the guardrail. These crashes are from the side, when the car strikes the very beginning of the guardrail as you’re driving down the highway.

The biggest guardrail manufacturer in the world is facing a growing number of lawsuits, over its guardrail end terminals named ET-Plus… (more)

Gov. Brown signs bills promoting bike paths

: latimes – excerpt

Gov. Jerry Brown on Saturday signed into law two measures aimed at helping cities and counties expand and improve bike paths and trails, including one allowing voters to consider whether to increase some fees to pay for the work.

Local agencies, including cities and park districts, could place proposals on the ballot that, with a two-thirds vote from local residents, would impose a motor vehicle registration surcharge of up to $5 in those districts, with the proceeds going to developing and maintaining bikeway networks.

Sen. Mark DeSaulnier (D-Concord) said his bill will allow communities to provide a transportation alternative to driving cars on congested streets. He cited a study that found the more bike lanes provided per square mile in a city, the more commuters took bikes rather than cars.

“Upgrading bike infrastructure will help public safety, the environment and the quality of life in cities across California,” DeSaulnier said of SB 1183.

Brown also agreed to give local governments more flexibility in designing bikeways.

Under existing law, bike lanes must fit precise standards set by the state’s transportation department. AB 1193 by Assemblyman Phil Ting (D-San Francisco) allows cities to plan such lanes that may not meet the state’s standards, as long as the designs meet the guidelines set by a national association of public transportation officials… (more)

If you object and you haven’t yet complained to Governor Brown, Ting and DeSaulnier and the other state reps who are following the dictates of the non-profit bike coalitions, you may want to do so now. Contact info: http://discoveryink.wordpress.com/ca-legislation/state-legislators/

 

 

No Free Rides: Finally, Inevitably: Muni Is Suing Muni

By sfweekly – excerpt

Wednesday, May 28 2014: You can add Muni management to the burgeoning list of people blindsided by Muni drivers.

Earlier this month, a U.S. District Court judge certified some 2,500 drivers — every man and woman who has slipped behind the wheel of a bus, train, trolley, or cable car since July 2009 — as a class in a federal suit against Muni. And, like Muni, that suit is moving forward with extreme slowness — and may cost the city an arm and a leg…

There’s a lot of money riding on this determination. Multiply the $50 daily penalty for violating the Minimum Wage Ordinance by five years worth of days and 2,500 workers. The total: $228 million. That’s a lot of cash. And a lot of leverage, if a settlement is in the offing… (more)

Ever wonder why your Muni bus is late? Who do you blame? The drivers blame management and are suing them. We are re-visiting this story to remind voters where Muni money goes. A large chunk goes to pay for management’s legal losses. In this case they are charged with failure to adhere to labor laws, but in many others they are charged with collecting on false tickets. More than 30% of all settlements San Francisco pays are attributed to SFMTA complaints.

RELATED:
Muni drivers in class action lawsuit against agency

Mayor Lee To Take $648 Million Muni Ride Friday Morning

: sfist – excerpt

Hey, somebody write this down: this week, Mayor Ed Lee is riding Muni not once, but twice! First, he took the M-Ocean on Tuesday, to, he told the Chron, “try to experience it with everybody else.” And this morning he’ll be taking Muni Metro again, but this time his ride comes with a $648 million price tag.

As we mentioned back in July, the SFMTA Board agreed to make an unprecedentedly-huge purchase of new light rail vehicles intended to boost the fleet and reduce breakdowns. How unprecedentedly-huge? $1.18 billion in total, for a purchase of 260 cars.

So last week, the Board of Supes OKed the initial contract with transit company Siemens, to the tune of $648 million for 175 Muni Metro vehicles to be manufactured in their Sacramento plant. Today the Mayor will sign off on the plan…and will take a little ride in the process.

According to a press release sent by the mayor’s office, the Mayor and the SFMTA will this morning operate a “test train that will take first diagnostic measurements of rails to inform Siemens’ manufacturing of new Light Rail Vehicles.” Assuming that things go smoothly (heh), the mayor will will also sign the resolution on the purchase and contract at that time… (more)

RELATED:
The mayor takes a ride on Muni, (doesn’t look so happy about it)

SFMTA board approves contract for Mission Bay loop project

By sfexaminer – excerpt

As Mission Bay gets built out, so is transportation infrastructure in the area to accommodate the greater demand.

San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency board of directors on Tuesday approved a contract not to exceed $3.5 million with Mitchell Engineering to install tracks on the block surrounded by Third, 18th, Illinois and 19th streets to create a short loop for the Muni T-Third Street line.

The Mission Bay loop will allow the southbound light-rail line to turn left onto 18th Street, travel around the block on Illinois and 19th streets and make a right onto northbound Third Street. It will be a “critical component” of the central waterfront area and provide a short turnaround for trains once the Central Subway extending the T-Third line north to Chinatown opens in 2019, SFMTA spokesman Paul Rose said… (more)

Wiener Moves to Make NACTO Street Design Guides Official Policy for SF

by : sf.streetsblog – excerpt

Supervisor Scott Wiener has introduced a bill that would make the National Association of City Transportation Officials’ guides for Urban Streets and Urban Bikeways official city policy. The SFMTA Board of Directors already adopted the NACTO guides in January, but Wiener’s legislation would establish them as official guidelines for other agencies to use, including the Department of Public Works, the Planning Department, and the SF Fire Department… (more)

We have Phil Ting’s AB 1193 to thank for this headache, and the lobbies hired by the SFMTA and the Bicycle Coalition who wrote and sold it to the state legislature.

Send inquires to the other city agencies that this legislation seeks to control, such as the Fire Department and other emergency responders. Find out how concerned they are about the narrow streets and other obstructions SFMTA is planning to fund with the Prop A Bond funds.

Let SF City officials know who you blame for gridlock and ask the state assembly candidates who they plan to support when they get to Sacramento.

 

Report says SF taxis suffering greatly

By sfexaminer – excerpt

Just how big a hit the taxi industry has taken since app-based ride services like Uber, Lyft and Sidecar rose to popularity has been quantified, and The City’s transit agency, as cab regulator, has several courses it can take to help level the playing field.

The taxi industry’s health “overall is being impacted clearly” by competing transportation network companies, said Kate Toran, who took over as interim Taxis and Accessible Services director for the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency in June and was named to the position permanently a couple weeks ago.

In her first presentation in the role to the SFMTA board of directors at 1 p.m. today in City Hall Room 400, Toran plans to discuss the downward trend in average trips per taxicab from 1,424 per month in March 2012 to 504 this past July…

“It’s time for [the] MTA as a regulator to really review the regulations and make sure our regulations have been thoroughly reviewed and that they still make sense,” Toran said. “Our bottom line is public safety, but to the extent that the regulations can be more flexible and more responsive and we have a process to update.”…  more)

RELATED:
SF Cabbies Closer to Becoming an Affiliated Union
Uber, Lyft Fallout: Taxi Rides Plunge in San Francisco
MTA Board Meeting on line