Eastern Neighborhoods

The biggest problem we face is the elimination of traffic lanes and parking spots on our major streets. The Potrero Avenue plan, along with the expansion of General Hospital is a travesty in more ways than one. Let the Supervisors know how you feel about the way SFMTA is managing traffic and parking:
http://metermadness.wordpress.com/district-supervisors

The RPP request to extend Zone W was filed. Go here to download these and other documents: http://sfenuf.net/Docs.html
Residential Parking Permit Petitions: RPP forms
Business Parking Permit Forms: RPP Biz forms

NEMBA has is developing another plan for PDRs and businesses here:
http://nembasf.org/events/

Here are some photos of the streets in the Eastern Neighborhoods that the SFMTA claims need calming and more parking controls. In truth, the streets are filling up during the day because of SFMTA’s efforts to remove parking spaces. People park here because the BART station is nearby, and because they have been squeezed out of their neighborhoods. Sound familiar? At night and on weekends there is more than ample parking.  Click on an image to launch slide show.

Most residents agree our neighborhoods need more parking, not less. We need parking right off the freeways exits so we can take public transit and not waste all day getting to the final destination. Some Supervisors and Candidates agree.

This website is provided by the City and County of San Francisco to assist San Franciscans to make street improvements in their neighborhoods, shopping districts, and workplaces. The site provides information on street improvement project types, the City’s permitting process, maintenance responsibilities, and applicable codes and guidelines. http://www.sfbetterstreets.org/

Recent Posts

Here’s Another Chance for You to Pay More for Better Buses and Safer Roads

: sfweekly – excerpt

Funding for public transportation has never been based on population in San Francisco, believe it or not. That might all change in November if a new charter amendment passed by the Board of Supervisors this week makes it to the general ballot. This bump in cashflow won’t just fund Muni – it’ll also help finance street safety measures that benefit cyclists and pedestrians.

Until now Muni and other transportation funding has come from the federal government and the city. While the fares that riders pay helps to adjust for population, it’s not all enough money to run the buses and the streets. With the recent rapid growth citywide, both Muni and the streets (and BART, but that’s another matter) struggle to keep pace with the demand. To put all this into content: San Francisco has grown by about 100,000 residents in the last two decades, and 20,000 residents in the last four years.
The additional cash would add up to about $23 million, with 25 percent going to pedestrian and cycling-related infrastructure. The rest would go to increasing Muni capacity. That roughly $5 or $6 million in cycling infrastructure could buy plenty of bike elevators or some new sidewalk bulb-outs, bike lanes, green boxes — all things that would make streets safer for the more vulnerable road users (bikes, moms with strollers).

That figure would dramatically increase the money that’s currently earmarked for bike and pedestrian projects by about 15 percent. According to the city budget, San Francisco spends some $24.9 million on bike projects and $3.7 million on pedestrian safety projects.

Jeff Cretan, legislative aid for Supervisor Scott Weiner, who proposed the charter amendment, said that, based on the City Controller’s estimates, funding from the ballot measure would pump in $22 million initially, and increase up to $25 million in the following two years. Cretan said that this measure was effectively a stop-gap to get more money to public transportation in lieu of the Vehicle License Fee(more)

$24.9 million on bike projects and $3.7 million on pedestrian safety projects seems like a rather unbalanced distribution given that there are so many more pedestrians that cyclists, but, then both biking and walking used to be free, so we’re not sure why they are so expensive.

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  2. The Unpopular SFMTA Used to Poll Neighbors Before Permanently Installing Traffic Circles, But Not Anymore – Why’s That? Leave a reply
  3. Muni gets red carpet treatment on Market Leave a reply
  4. Separated bikeway along the Embarcadero Leave a reply
  5. “Fixed App” Parking App Secures Funding Leave a reply
  6. This app will guide you to parking — and may get you a ticket, too Leave a reply
  7. Potrero Hill Democratic Club: D10 Supervisorial Candidates’ Debate Leave a reply
  8. Will San Francisco voters give Muni more money to serve a growing population? Leave a reply
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