Economic cleansing, part two

Guardian Editorial – excerpt

Don’t let realtors’ cash determine the future of San Francisco
EDITORIAL
Over the next two years, tens of thousands of San Franciscans will face the loss of their homes. If the current tech boom is anything like the last one, the impact on the city will be the economic equivalent of a massive earthquake, with displacement transforming entire neighborhoods and low-income tenants, artists, writers, musicians, small merchants, cheap restaurants, and nonprofits getting chucked aside to make way for an influx of wealthier people and the businesses that serve them.
That’s why the supervisorial races are so critically important — and why groups like the Association of Realtors, which wants to limit tenant protections, is throwing such a huge amount of money into two district races… (more)

What is wrong with the status quo? Why do people move to San Francisco if they don’t like it as is? San Francisco residents revere our city as a jewel, like Paris, to be preserved with our views, quaint neighborhoods, and distinct cultures intact.
Being progressive is of no political consequence when the primary decision is whether to preserve the city as it is or tear it down and rebuild it. This is where the denser population along a transit corridor argument begins to distort reality.
Look behind the green mask of the SFMTA’s allegiance to Transit First anti car plans and you will find the connection between the “greening” argument and the green money of the developers intent on displacing property owners as fast as they can so they can grab up their land on the cheap.
Ask the folks in Potrero Hill, Parkmerced, and North Beach about the city’s plans to dislocate them, or crowd them out with tall buildings blocking their views. Then look at your own neighborhood and watch them rezone portions of it to lift height limits. Or, watch the efforts to turn your residential neighborhoods into mixed-use commercial and residential zones, so they can deny you residential parking rights and implant meters in front of your homes.
Do you want to restructure San Francisco into a high tech futuristic city devoid of views and historic buildings, or do you want to preserve what we have? That is the question voters need to concern themselves with. Who best represents your interests?
Supervisors and Candidates statements

 

2 thoughts on “Economic cleansing, part two

  1. Pingback: Standing Up to Legal Appeal, SFMTA Moves Ahead With Fell Street Bike Lane | Meter Madness

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