SF To Start Issuing Real Tickets For Expired Parking Meters Sunday

Reporting Barbara Taylor : sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com – excerpt

SAN FRANCISCO (KCBS) – San Francisco is done with the warnings. Parking enforcement officers will begin writing tickets for expired parking meters this Sunday, city officials said.
Some 11,000 warnings have been issued since the law to enforce parking meters on Sundays took effect with the new year, said a spokesman for the Municipal Transportation Agency.
Tickets issued on Jan. 27 will carry fines ranging from $65 to $75. The MTA estimates the meters and tickets will bring in about $1.7 million annually.
Transportation officials now insist it’s not about the money. The MTA cited increased turnover in business areas as the main benefit of Sunday meters…
Michael Pappas, director of the San Francisco Interfaith Council, hastened to add that religious organizations aren’t the only ones who want the city to give parking meters a rest on Sundays.
“I’ve been approached by people who are not even part of the religious community who are just appalled that this is happening, and they’re telling me they would like to initiate a ballot measure.”… (more)

Note the change in expected income. SFMTA has changed they anticipated income from $2 million to 1.7 million.

Every time they say parking turn-over, that means parking restrictions. That is the reason for everything they do.

How does this effect the residential neighborhoods with parking meters? What kind of turnover do they need?

Residents will be forced to drive or re-park on Sundays.

Supervisors, are you listening? Repeal this ridiculous decision.

Proposal to raze I-280 linked to train and real estate deals

By Steven T. Jones : SFBG.com – excerpt

It’s a bold idea, discussed for years behind closed doors and recently announced in a strangely understated and pro-growth way: Tear down the last mile of Interstate 280 and replace it with an wide boulevard – reminiscent of the removal of the Central and Embarcadero freeways – in order to facilitate the extension of electrified Caltrain and high-speed rail tracks into the Transbay Terminal…

Proposal to raze I-280 linked to train and real estate deals

01.23.13 – 4:03 pm | Steven T. Jones |

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State plans to facilitate more trains by further isolating Mission Bay led to the proposal to tear down I-280 at 16th Street.

 

It’s a bold idea, discussed for years behind closed doors and recently announced in a strangely understated and pro-growth way: Tear down the last mile of Interstate 280 and replace it with an wide boulevard – reminiscent of the removal of the Central and Embarcadero freeways – in order to facilitate the extension of electrified Caltrain and high-speed rail tracks into the Transbay Terminal.
For almost three years, city planners have been discussing the idea and drawing up closely guarded plans to tear down the freeway, discussions sparked by the state’s Environmental Impact Reports on electrifying the Caltrain tracks and bringing high-speed trains into town. With an increasing number of trains traveling those tracks, access to the rapidly growing Mission Bay area from the west on 16th Street would turn into a traffic nightmare, either with long waits for an at-grade train crossing or the creation of ugly and uninviting underpasses for cars and bikes….
So a staff-level proposal to solve a transportation challenge with an elegant multi-modal solution that follows in the city’s tradition of tearing down freeways has morphed into a real estate deal. Quentin Kopp, the father of high-speed rail in California, has already derided the Transbay Terminal project (which is funded by the sale of state land surrounding the site to office tower developers) as little more than a real estate deal, and now the city is apparently seeking to extend that deal further into Mission Bay…. (more)

 

Sue Hestor pushes fight against Manhattanization

SFGate : excerpt

Many San Francisco developers look on attorney Sue Hestor as the local equivalent of Rufus T. Firefly: whatever it is, she’s against it. Born in Maine, Hestor arrived here in 1969 and soon joined the battle against “Manhattanization” that defined city politics in the 1970s. The crusade led her to enroll at Golden Gate University’s School of Law – “I realized we needed a lawyer” – and she passed the bar in 1976. Since then she’s been active in efforts to impose transit and housing fees on developers, to bar towers from casting shadows on city parks, and to require large institutions to file citywide master plans. Her clients include the hotel workers union as well as a steady stream of neighbors concerned about what may happen near their homes.
A Bernal Heights resident who describes herself as “an environmentalist whose values have always been to get the city to accommodate as many working people as possible,” Hestor spoke with Chronicle Urban Design Critic John King in her office in the Flood Building. “I’ve been here since 1980. I’m the third longest tenant in this building.”… (more)

Our comment on this article. Add your own:

Sue Hestor is one of a number of attorneys who are fighting developers and city officials who want to Manhattanize San Francisco.
There are many others, backed by a growing numbers of neighborhood groups filled with voters, including some of those “suburban workers” cited in this article, who want to keep the spirit and lifestyle of San Francisco as it is. Many of the young professionals who commute to the peninsula are active members of ENUF, the group that is joining others to fight against the restrictive parking policies being enacted by the SFMTA, one of the primary tools used by developers to make us leave to make room for their vision of our city.
The SFMTA employs restrictive parking policies such as Sunday parking to make life as difficult and confusing as possible. If you disagree with the SFMTA sign our petition to Stop SFMTA: sfenuf.org

 

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