2009 San Francisco Bicycle Plan Update

http://sfmta.com/news/project-updates/2009-san-francisco-bicycle-plan-update

The 2009 San Francisco Bicycle Plan outlined 60 improvement projects and long-term opportunities for bicycle route upgrades.

The following is a list of near-term projects that remain and are anticipated to be constructed within the five years following the completion of the Bike Plan’s final environmental review:

  • Project 2-1: 2nd Street bicycle lanes, King Street to Market Street
  • Project 2-3: 14th Street eastbound bicycle lane, Dolores Street to Market Street
  • Project 2-7: Fremont Street southbound bicycle lane, Folsom Street to Harrison Street
  • Project 3-2: Masonic Avenue bicycle lanes, Fell Street to Geary Boulevard
  • Project 3-4: Polk Street northbound contraflow bicycle lane, Market Street to McAllister Street
  • Project 5-6: Cesar Chavez/26th Streets corridor bicycle lanes, Sanchez Street to US 101
  • Project 5-13: Bayshore Boulevard bicycle lanes, Paul Avenue to Silver Avenue
  • Project 7-1: 7th Avenue at Lincoln Way intersection improvements

See if you can guess where the financing for this is coming from. You guessed it, the bond measures they want you to pass. And guess who was paid to create these plans?

Paratransit driver strike would impact SF residents

Muni testing new train car with fewer seats, more rider capacity

On Wednesday morning, a very different train car was put into service on the N-Judah line. Its 14 double-wide seats were replaced with seven single seats. It’s certain the change did not go unnoticed.

“Normally on the aisle of the light-rail vehicle it allows for two rows of people, and no one can get in between them,” said Supervisor Scott Wiener, who that morning boarded the re-configured car at Ninth and Irving streets. “Now you have people holding on to the handrail and an entire row of people could file in between them. To me it seems positive.”

The idea, which Wiener first pushed for in 2011, is that two more people can fit aboard a train for every seat that’s removed. In this case, the change adds space for 10 more riders… (more)

Ten more standing room only spots. Obviously not for elderly, sick, weak, disabled,  or very young riders. For a city trying to appear “family friendly” these are a very bad choice.

How fast can trains full of standing passengers go? Make up your mind MTA. Do you want more passengers per train or faster trains?