Mayor Vows to Punish Supes Who Backed Wiener’s Transit Funding Measure

By Aaron Bialick : sfstreets – excerpt

Mayor Ed Lee, who has cut into transportation funding by nixing Sunday parking meters and abandoning a proposed vehicle license fee increase, now says that he will punish the six supervisors who voted to approve a ballot measure to increase transportation’s share of the general fund. Supervisor Scott Wiener proposed the charter amendment as a stop-gap measure to fund the city’s transportation needs, while SF waits two years for the mayor to support a vehicle license fee measure…

The SF Chronicle reported on Sunday that ”the mayor’s office seems to be hinting that it will target programs important to the six supervisors who voted to place Wiener’s proposal on the ballot — Wiener, David Chiu, Jane Kim, London Breed, Malia Cohen and David Campos.”…. (more)

S.F. voters likely to give each other finger as Sean Parker’s pro-auto measure drives onto November ballot

By : bizjournals – excerpt

San Francisco voters will have their say on one of today’s hottest debates, whether the automobile provides unprecedented personal freedom or is the root cause of all that’s wrong with America.

The measure put forward by auto enthusiasts is designed to rein in San Francisco’s transit first policy by “restoring transportation balance in San Francisco,” as the initiative is titled. The full text is posted on the city’s Department of Elections website. Tech giant Sean Parker is providing the financial firepower behind the measure, TechCrunch reported. That’s likely to further inflame the tech backlash in San Francisco…

San Francisco voters will have their say on three traffic measures this November.

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee said Monday that he’s putting a $500 million bond measure on the November ballot to pay for transportation improvements. Supervisor Scott Wiener has placed a measure on the ballot that would tie Muni funding to the city’s population growth, with a 10-year retroactive feature.

The pro-auto initiative on the November ballot notes that 79 percent of San Francisco households own or lease an auto and that nearly half of the city’s residents who work outside their homes get to work by car… (more)

 

Should S.F. make it easier or harder to drive and park in the city?

Business Pulse – Polls and Surveys : bizjournals – excerpt

Easier. Most people still drive; deal with it. 41%

Harder. More cars will just mean more gridlock. 25%

Neither. Transit vs. cars doesn’t have to be either/or 33%

Votes Cast: 221

VOTE NOW: http://www.bizjournals.com/sanfrancisco/poll/poll/15073351#comments

This survey is not a scientific sampling, but offers a quick view of what readers are thinking