The Slow Lane: The City’s Anecdotal and Statistical Traffic Studies Collide

Anecdotally, traffic is bloody awful in this city and getting worse every day. Anecdotally, the roads have never been so clogged and it’s never been easier to leap from rooftop to rooftop of the legions of vehicles navigating San Francisco at a glacial pace…

Bay Bridge auto counts for October indicate around 128,000 cars heading into San Francisco on a daily basis. That is 3,000 to 5,000 more cars than in recent years — but fewer cars than in 2005. The number of vehicles heading into town via the Golden Gate Bridge topped 40 million in the fiscal year concluding in June. That’s more than either of the last two years — but fewer than fiscal 2010 and fewer than any year between 1985 and 2001.

So, it’s busy. But it has been busier.

The San Francisco County Transportation Authority has undertaken detailed analyses of congestion and average vehicle speeds along major San Francisco corridors.  Counterintuitively for anyone who traverses this city on a daily basis, traffic counts are down and average speed is up… (more)

This evidence supports our claims that the SFMTA is to blame for gridlock, not the drivers. They planned and engineered traffic jams by eliminating traffic lanes and street parking.

If you agree with us, let the SFMTA and the supervisors know that you do not trust the SFMTA to fix the problem they created. Sign the petition to Stop SFMTA.

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One thought on “The Slow Lane: The City’s Anecdotal and Statistical Traffic Studies Collide

  1. Pingback: Studies Show Car Traffic in San Francisco is Dropping | Meter Madness

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