Opinion: On-street car sharing is San Francisco’s future

By Scott Wiener : sfchronicle – excerpt

The Municipal Transportation Agency recently began implementing an on-street car-sharing program to improve access to car sharing in San Francisco. The program has caused some controversy, given the many challenges surrounding parking in our city. However, this program is central to San Francisco’s long-term transportation success. Studies suggest that car sharing will induce some residents to give up their cars, which will reduce competition for parking…

Some have objected to the program as privatizing public space. However, the city has long allowed private entities to monopolize street parking spaces if the use serves a practical purpose. Private businesses reserve curb space to receive shipments. Passenger loading zones for taxicabs occupy space in front of hotels. Similarly, homeowners are permitted to eliminate on-street parking by privatizing curb space via a curb cut for a driveway. We allow these privatizations of curb space in an effort to balance our community’s varied transportation needs. Allowing a small amount of curb space for car-sharing services is no different. Car sharing is a valuable service to the public… (more)

The fact that a District Supervisor is hawking an enterprise that completes with private businesses is alarming. Since when is the city and everything in it for sale? Since when is it ok for a city regulatory agency to complete with the businesses that it is regulating? Call it what it is. City Car Share is a rental business.

There are a number of problems with the sharing economy, which we will not go into here. We will mention the fact that car manufacturers rely on car sales to pay for the R and D that got us to the point we are now with cleaner more efficient engines. If you want better products you will need to boost sales, not cut them off.

 

 

SFpark Project Proves Smart Parking System Efficiency

By Marcin Maroszek : gpsbusinessnews – excerpt

Technology development on one hand and increasing traffic problems on the other, lead to a situation where authorities are more willing to invest in Smart Parking Systems (SPS). Example of San Francisco proves that SPS are effective for fighting both – traffic jams and virtual parking deficiency problem… (more)

Don’t believe the SFMTA. Traffic and parking are far worse than they were before anyone introduced any digital parking systems. You can’t use virtual digital solutions to solve actual physical problems. Parking with an app is like withdrawing cash from an ATM. It only works as long as there is money in the account. This is a PR job written by one PR firm to another and published on a trade site. A lot of back slapping going on here.

Muni’s Sluggish 30-Stockton Finally Set to Get Greater Priority on the Streets

by : sf.streetsblog – excerpt

Muni’s notoriously sluggish 30-Stockton line is finally set to get some upgrades that will give buses higher priority on streets through the dense neighborhoods of Union Square, Chinatown, North Beach, and near Fisherman’s Wharf…

Wu noted that it’s “still important to listen to community input” on the bus upgrades. A recent public outreach open house held in Chinatown by the SFMTA about the project was sparsely attended, but it’s unclear why.

One attendee, Jim Fong, said he rides the 30 and 45 regularly, and that he’s concerned about longer walking distances for seniors once stop spacing is increased from every block to every two blocks. Citywide, a 2010 Muni survey of riders found that 61 percent would consider walking a longer distance, if it meant the overall ride would be quicker and more reliable.

Aside from stop consolidation, the only point of contention for some seems to be proposals to remove car parking for transit upgrades. Chinatown residents and merchants don’t seem to depend much on car storage, and they’ve been happy to ban car parking on Stockton Street to boost business during the busy Lunar New Year shopping season.

It’s unclear how many car parking spaces would be removed in total for transit amenities, like 11 transit bulb-outs that allow for faster and easier boarding. Crosswalks at 18 intersections along the route would be made safer with bulb-outs, whether or not those intersections have bus stops.

The plans also include a two-block road diet on one-way Kearny Street, where the northbound 30 runs between Market and Sutter. Removing one of the street’s four narrow traffic lanes would allow for wider traffic lanes that better fit buses, the SFMTA says. It’s unclear if the road diet would extend beyond Sutter… (more)