Police captain against Bike Yield Law

By  : sfexaminer – excerpt

The man who started the “bike crackdown,” ramping up ticketing of cyclists rolling slowly through stop signs or blowing red lights, has now come out publicly against the proposed Bike Yield Law.

San Francisco Police Department Captain John Sanford, who heads Park Station near the Panhandle, torched the new law in his newest Park Station Newsletter.

“Being such a dense city, with so many visitors and distracted drivers, I will never be convinced it is safe to disobey any of the traffic laws, especially stop signs and red lights,” Sanford wrote in the newsletter.

The Bike Yield Law was proposed by Supervisor John Avalos, and was passed on first reading at the Board of Supervisors without a veto-proof majority. It will be voted on a second and final time Jan. 12. Mayor Ed Lee vowed to veto it.

The law would task the SFPD with deprioritizing enforcement of cyclists who safely yield at stop signs, and come to a full stop if they see autos or pedestrians. If neither are present, cyclists may roll through the intersection without stopping…

The man who started the “bike crackdown,” ramping up ticketing of cyclists rolling slowly through stop signs or blowing red lights, has now come out publicly against the proposed Bike Yield Law.

San Francisco Police Department Captain John Sanford, who heads Park Station near the Panhandle, torched the new law in his newest Park Station Newsletter.

“Being such a dense city, with so many visitors and distracted drivers, I will never be convinced it is safe to disobey any of the traffic laws, especially stop signs and red lights,” Sanford wrote in the newsletter.

The Bike Yield Law was proposed by Supervisor John Avalos, and was passed on first reading at the Board of Supervisors without a veto-proof majority. It will be voted on a second and final time Jan. 12. Mayor Ed Lee vowed to veto it.

The law would task the SFPD with deprioritizing enforcement of cyclists who safely yield at stop signs, and come to a full stop if they see autos or pedestrians. If neither are present, cyclists may roll through the intersection without stopping… (more)

Maybe the recent media coverage about the strong police presence around the wiggle is causing cyclists to drive more carefully through those intersections, making them safer.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s