Federal Review of MTC

Federal Review of MTC’s Role in the Bay Area Transportation Planning Process

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) are reviewing  MTC’s performance as the transportation planning agency for the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area. They are largely responsible for allocating your tax dollars to the various local transportation authorities. Are your transportation priorities being met?

If you have any opinions on how the MTC prioritizes projects, you may share them in a letter or via email by March 3, 2016 to:

Stew Sonnenberg, stew.sonnenberg@dot.gov
FHWA California Division
650 Capitol Mall, Suite 4-100
Sacramento, CA 95814

Ted Matley, ted.matley@dot.gov
Federal Transit Administration, TRO-9
90 Seventh Street, Suite 15-300
San Francisco, CA 94103-6701

If anyone wants to start a sample letter we can post one.

San Francisco Awards its first Bus Rapid Transit Construction Contract

SFMTA – (excerpt) dated Tuesday, July 7, 2015

…“This milestone is the latest example of how the City of San Francisco is coming together to get big projects done and improve our transportation network for everyone,” said Chairman of the SFMTA Board of Directors, Tom Nolan. “Opening in 2019, this project is an essential bus rapid transit option that will provide a quicker ride through a major corridor.”

The SFMTA has authorized a new integrated project delivery method that can be used across the agency as a way to deliver projects more efficiently. Under this new project delivery method, the awarded construction manager/general contractor, Walsh Construction Company for Van Ness BRT, will assist and advise the project team in completing the project’s design and planning its construction, including recommendations for schedule improvements and cost savings opportunities. Once the design is finalized, a guaranteed maximum price for the project will be negotiated. Walsh Construction Company has extensive experience building public infrastructure and transit projects nationally.

“One of our top priorities is to deliver key projects that make our transportation more reliable,” said Ed Reiskin, SFMTA Director of Transportation. “The new integrated project delivery method allows for much-needed collaboration between our agency and the construction manager before the project begins. Pre-construction coordination is a win-win for the people doing the work, for the people impacted by it, and for the people who depend on these projects to keep San Francisco moving.”… (more)

How will this cut costs? How can you negotiate a deal on an unfinished design? This sounds like what happened to the Super Bowl negotiations. How did that turn out? Comments appreciated. They just spent 1.4 million dollars in 2010. Now they are going to re-construct what they just did?

RELATED: Does this mean Van Ness Avenue will be under construction for three years?
Diagram showing general timeline for project through service implementation

This seems to contradict the press release: The Van Ness Corridor Transit Improvement Project team is currently in the process of finalizing the design, determining the construction sequence and schedule, and finalizing the traffic management plan. When the design is completed, the Construction Manager/General Contractor (CM/GC) and SFMTA will mutually agree on a Guaranteed Maximum Price, or the project may then be bid out… (more)

 

1500-2000 Uber Drivers Expected To Participate In Super Bowl Protest Monday

Because we have the Super Bowl happening here, we have them by the balls,” “Uber Drivers United” leader Mario says in a video posted to YouTube Sunday. That why, he says, between 1500-2000 drivers are expected to drive slowly through San Francisco Monday afternoon, protesting what he says is Uber’s practice of “screwing over” drivers.

According to Mario (who did not give his last name in the video), Uber is planning on dropping driver wages to “50 cents per mile before [the] Super Bowl,” and this protest is an effort to register displeasure over that as well as to indicate interest in “Cityride,” which he says will be “a new company that is not going to screw over the drivers anymore.”

(It’s unclear if Mario is referring to the CityRide car service app, which was recently established by a trio of local limo services, or another, similarly-named service.)

Mario says that today, drivers will meet at 2 p.m. at “the big parking lot” at the former site of Candlestick Park. From there they’ll proceed slowly, caution lights on, to protest at Vermont and 16th Street, which is apparently Uber’s San Francisco driver’s office.

After a pass there, drivers will proceed to San Francisco City Hall to stage another slow-driving demonstration. Then it’s off to protest at Uber’s headquarters at 1455 Market Street, which is between 10th and 11th Streets — yes, a significant distance from the road blocks near Super Bowl City, but given how rotten the downtown closures have made traffic overall, anyone traveling on surface streets should expect to find themselves at a standstill.

In the video, Mario suggests that drivers are shooting for even more of an impact than their “honk-in” on January 25(more)