Billions spent, but fewer people are using public transportation in Southern California than in 1985

By Laura J. Nelson and Dan Weikel : ridrrants – excerpt

“Despite a $9-billion investment in new light rail and subway lines, [LA County] Metro now has fewer boardings than it did three decades ago [1985], when buses were the county’s only transit option.”

Of course, the central planners’ answer is always the same — “It doesn’t work, so we need to do MORE of the same.”  Sigh.

One thing’s for sure — the planners still get their fat paychecks and astonishingly rich pensions.  No performance standards are in play… (more)

Metro plans to spend more than $12 billion over the next 10 years to build two new rail lines and three extensions, the largest capital investment of any transit agency in the country.

Here’s a thoughtful article from the liberal LA TIMES on the failure of public transit to gain traction in the city of Los Angeles.  Light rail mass transit is ever-popular with choo-choo train lovers and central planners, but doesn’t serve the needs of most of the demographic segment that NEEDS public transportation — the poor and the blue collar folks.  Meanwhile providing a quality, responsive bus service has been a low priority for central planners.   The results speak for themselves.

For almost a decade, transit ridership has declined across Southern California despite enormous and costly efforts by top transportation officials to entice people out of their cars and onto buses and trains.
The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, the region’s largest carrier, lost more than 10% of its boardings from 2006 to 2015, a decline that appears to be accelerating. Despite a $9-billion investment in new light rail and subway lines, Metro now has fewer boardings than it did three decades ago, when buses were the county’s only transit option.
Most other agencies fare no better. In Orange County, bus ridership plummeted 30% in the last seven years, while some smaller bus operators across the region have experienced declines approaching 25%. In the last two years alone, a Metro study found that 16 transit providers in Los Angeles County saw average quarterly declines of 4% to 5%.
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