Despite Increased Subsidy for Transit Commuting, Traffic’s Still Getting Worse

fortune -excerpt

What looked like a win for both transit and traffic won’t do much to help either.

What looked like a win for both transit and traffic won’t do much to help either.

In a new analysis, the transportation research group TransitCenter has concluded that a recent increase in a tax benefit for workers who commute by mass transit isn’t enough to balance out the longstanding parking subsidy for those who choose to drive.

For decades, federal tax code had allowed employers to apply a portion of workers’ pre-tax salary to pay for parking at work—$250 per month before the recent adjustment. According to a 2014 analysis by TransitCenter, that tax subsidy added over 800,000 daily car trips to U.S. roads, while costing the U.S. Treasury $7.3 billion in revenue each year.

What looked like a win for both transit and traffic won’t do much to help either.

In a new analysis, the transportation research group TransitCenter has concluded that a recent increase in a tax benefit for workers who commute by mass transit isn’t enough to balance out the longstanding parking subsidy for those who choose to drive.

For decades, federal tax code had allowed employers to apply a portion of workers’ pre-tax salary to pay for parking at work—$250 per month before the recent adjustment. According to a 2014 analysis by TransitCenter, that tax subsidy added over 800,000 daily car trips to U.S. roads, while costing the U.S. Treasury $7.3 billion in revenue each year.

Lawmakers eventually responded to critiques of the parking subsidy by adding a parallel benefit for commuting by train or bus, but it topped out at only $130 a month as of last year. Then, in a legislative victory for transit advocates, last December’s omnibus budget and tax extension bill (known inside the beltway as the “omnibender”) set both benefits to $255 a month.

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Sunset district neighbors wary of proposed changes to L-Taraval Muni line

By : sfexaminer – excerpt

Sunset district neighbors reached a compromise Wednesday night on changes to Taraval Street intended to make the L-Taraval train safer, despite many expressing fears that the proposal will make the neighborhood less accessible.

Chiefly, neighbors worried that concrete boarding islands would reduce parking and endanger local businesses. People also said newly moved or eliminated stops would force seniors to walk too far for the train.

“I don’t want my stops taken away,” said Nerissa Hu, who said she depends on the 17th Avenue stop, which was originally slated to be removed. Without it, Hu says she will need to walk uphill to make her regular L trip.

The victory for the neighborhood wasn’t complete, neighbors said, but it was a start.

Sean Kennedy, a planner at the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, tried to explain the compromise to a room packed with more than 200 neighbors.

It was tough going.

Gathered in Dianne Feinstein Elementary School’s cafeteria, the enraged neighbors lambasted staff at full volume.

They heckled, booed, hissed and yelled… (more)

San Francisco citizens are the way the SFMTA is destroying out city. Wait till they find out how much in debt they are as well and how they intend to charge us for the privilege of all this disruption. They are fast spiraling out of control. Demand changes from the candidates running for supervisor positions. Demand a that the Supervisors take back control of the SFMAT board through the appointment process.

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