Meet the SF man responsible for more than a quarter of all tech bus complaints

By Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez :  SFExaminer – excerpt

Edward Mason is on the hunt, and his target is the elusive tech bus.

But Mason does not seek out his prey merely once. Instead, he catches the gleaming metal vehicles in the act of violating city rules on the “Commuter Shuttle Program,” repeatedly…

Employees of many tech companies hire commuter buses between San Francisco and Silicon Valley, which weave in and out of city neighborhoods to pick up employees.

Tech workers defend the shuttles, and often say Caltrain is too full to use in a Silicon Valley commute. Tech workers frequently say in meetings that the shuttles take many cars off the road…

A pilot program to monitor and regulate shuttle use began in August 2014, and that’s when Mason began his hunt. He’s been enormously effective…

Overall, Mason has provided information on commuter shuttles 282 times, according to the SFMTA.

Mason’s emails detail scores of infractions, including a shuttle idling in a narrow street it’s not allowed in, shuttles staging in Muni stops, shuttles blocking access to Muni buses, incorrect permit decals, incorrect license plates and more.

“The plan says buses are supposed to avoid deep and narrow streets,” he said, “but what else is there in San Francisco?”…(more)

The New Muni Cars Have Arrived—See What They Look Like Inside

By Kelly Bonner : upout – excerpt

After the April announcement that we’d be getting new BART cars, SFMTA announced that Siemens, the developers of San Francisco Muni cars, are ready with a fleet of 260 new vehicles that are set to be delivered by end of 2016 to replace the current fleet of 151. This means that by 2017, you could be looking at these new designs that were previewed in the Embarcadero recently. They feature a new seating configuration, new color schemes (including green instead of red!), new exterior design and a host of other features. Shiny…

But one big change is that the majority of seats will most likely be laid out longitudinally, instead of transverse like they are now:…(more)

BART seats.JPG

New BART seat arrangement, photo by Zrants

The Siemens vehicles are rail cars but seats are also being eliminated on BART and probably the new buses as well.

Do you really want people standing on buses going up and down steep hills and stopping and starting constantly? If public vehicles have standing passengers they should move slower and start and stop slower, not faster. I practically fell into a wheelchair when BART started suddenly the other day. How many people can reach the hangers? What is the plan for children and short people who can’t grab onto a seat or pole? Hang onto strangers?

Removing seats is not the way to convince more people to take Muni to run errands that involve moving stuff. We have seen anti-backpack comments from bus riders who feel backpacks take up extra space. Packages, wheelchairs, baby carriages, luggage, pets, and bikes, among others, take up space and displace humans. How long before Muni starts charging extra for the stuff?

We insist on all private vehicle passengers wearing seat belts. Where is the protection for public vehicle riders?

Transportation expert opines on the Plan Bay Area and other subjects.

Transit expert finds humor in the sad state of transportation in the Bay Area.

SF CEQA

americandreamcoalition – excerpt – (videos)

Downloads of Tom Rubin videos and reports:
http://americandreamcoalition.org/?page%20id=3979

Thomas A. Rubin, CPA, CMA, CMC, CIA, CGFM, CFM has over four decades of experience in government surface transportation and finance, concentrating on public transit. As a consultant and auditor, he has served well over 100 transit agencies, metropolitan planning organizations, state departments of transportation, the U.S. Department of Transportation, suppliers to the transit industry, and not-for-profits.

He founded and directed the public transportation practice of what is now Deloitte & Touche, LLP, growing it to the largest of its type. He has also served as the chief financial officer of two the largest transit systems in the U.S., including the Southern California Rapid Transit District (now Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority), the third largest.

Since 1996, he has been a sole practitioner consultant, helping government agencies to improve their capital, operational, and financial planning and…

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