Prop. L would divide City Hall influence over Muni and streets

By : sfexaminer – excerpt

Some city supervisors want more say over Muni and San Francisco’s streets.

To that end, Proposition L on the November ballot would split the appointments on the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, which runs Muni, between the Mayor’s Office and the Board of Supervisors.

Currently the mayor makes all seven appointments. If voters approve Prop. L, three of those appointments would go to the supervisors.

Also under Prop. L, the Board of Supervisors would need only a simple majority of six members to approve or veto SFMTA’s budget; now it needs seven.

The measure was authored by Supervisor Norman Yee, and is seen as one of a suite of other measures that would chip away at the power of the Mayor’s Office…(more)

We are hearing rumbles of discontent all over town, from Muni riders being ticketed for not knowing they needed a transfer to prove they paid, to standing Muni riders being tossed around on the hills on crowded buses. Many are irate over the seat and stop removal plans. Drivers have been annoyed for years and now SFMTA has gone too far in ignoring their riders as well. Why are we paying more for less service?

Cutting service, removing traffic lanes and parking, was already cutting into business, and now the SFMTA wants to raise sales tax, further pissing off the merchants and people who still try to buy from local shops. The voters are SMART ENUF to figure out that the SFMTA is the one that needs to go away.

SFMTA spends their time lobbying for money for “innovative transportation solutions” when Muni riders just want more buses, not innovations, pilot projects and “experiments” like the Red Lane treatments. By the way, how many people were told that the Red Lanes are an experiment? If that experiment fails, they have to be removed.

Thanks to the SF Examiner for supporting Proposition L and No on K.

Advertisements

Municipal Transportation Agency has Failed San Francisco

Op-ed by Mari Eliza : potreroview – excerpt

The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency’s (SFMTA) plan for traffic was to make it disappear. That plan has failed miserably.  SFMTA doesn’t appear to have a Plan B, other than to ignore the public and blame us for their failure. It’s time for them to disappear.

Since SFMTA laid the thermoplastic red carpet on Mission Street, residents and merchants from Taraval to Third Street have been protesting plans to expand their failed programs into other neighborhoods. There are allegations that the red thermoplastic carpet was laid on Mission Street without proper approval.

Talk of tearing down the 280 freeway and altering the residential parking permit system is generating more anger, and agreement that SFMTA isn’t the one to solve our transportation problems or manage our streets and parking. There are lawsuits over some of the plans; threats to stop others. This is a hot issue for candidates.

SFMTA is out of control, too big to succeed, and fiscally irresponsible. Now, voters can choose to change its policies and priorities by voting “yes” on L and “no” on K.  Proposition L, the SFMTA Charter Amendment on the November ballot, takes on issues of power and money by changing the makeup of SFMTA’s board and lowering the number of supervisors required to overturn its budget, bringing it in line with other departments.

Proposition K would increase the sales tax to pay for more SFMTA projects, putting at risk the merchants it hasn’t already put out of business with traffic and parking nightmares. Voting down Proposition K will force a major shift in SFMTA’s plans.

SFMTA has failed. We need new leadership that listens to the public. We don’t work for them. They work for us…(more)

For everyone who asks how passing Proposition L will make a difference we offer this quote from the Public Press, that expresses what Supervisor Yee has stated in bold terms, and explains why City Hall is spending million dollars to stop DHL+M.

“If approved, Proposition L would remake the Municipal Transportation Agency’s board from scratch as of July 1, 2017. On that day, seven new members would assume those seats after having been selected by the new method described above.”

Thanks to the Potrero View for supporting L, and opposing K.