Prop. L would divide City Hall influence over Muni and streets

By : sfexaminer – excerpt

Some city supervisors want more say over Muni and San Francisco’s streets.

To that end, Proposition L on the November ballot would split the appointments on the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, which runs Muni, between the Mayor’s Office and the Board of Supervisors.

Currently the mayor makes all seven appointments. If voters approve Prop. L, three of those appointments would go to the supervisors.

Also under Prop. L, the Board of Supervisors would need only a simple majority of six members to approve or veto SFMTA’s budget; now it needs seven.

The measure was authored by Supervisor Norman Yee, and is seen as one of a suite of other measures that would chip away at the power of the Mayor’s Office…(more)

We are hearing rumbles of discontent all over town, from Muni riders being ticketed for not knowing they needed a transfer to prove they paid, to standing Muni riders being tossed around on the hills on crowded buses. Many are irate over the seat and stop removal plans. Drivers have been annoyed for years and now SFMTA has gone too far in ignoring their riders as well. Why are we paying more for less service?

Cutting service, removing traffic lanes and parking, was already cutting into business, and now the SFMTA wants to raise sales tax, further pissing off the merchants and people who still try to buy from local shops. The voters are SMART ENUF to figure out that the SFMTA is the one that needs to go away.

SFMTA spends their time lobbying for money for “innovative transportation solutions” when Muni riders just want more buses, not innovations, pilot projects and “experiments” like the Red Lane treatments. By the way, how many people were told that the Red Lanes are an experiment? If that experiment fails, they have to be removed.

Thanks to the SF Examiner for supporting Proposition L and No on K.

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One thought on “Prop. L would divide City Hall influence over Muni and streets

  1. Reader’s Comment:
    Prop “L” is unfortunately necessary because when SFMTA was formalized as a City Transit Agency there was no appeals process created. People with disputes regarding policy or program decisions made by SFMTA had no other recourse than to litigate- if they had the money to do so. Further, because all of the SFMTA Board members were mayoral appointments, the thinking, the mindset of the “Board” reflected the thinking of one politician and his/her staff. From the outset, there has been no community-based influence on SFMTA planning, programs or operations. True reform should either reflect a District level election of “Board” members, or a mix of elected District members and mayoral appointments. True, community based input isn’t on the table. Without an overhaul of the SFMTA charter, Prop “L” is the most immediate fix available. Perhaps it will work; and, if it won’t it may spark a drive to reform the SFMTA charter. Change is necessary, and this half-step compromise is the only thing on the table. This is voter tinkering, but no one has offered anything else. Change is necessary, and getting the best you can- compromise- is sometimes doing what is possible at this time. Balancing interests as we move forward is a conservative, cautious way to inch forward towards something that will work better for all of the competing interests in this community, and for those who visit us. There are too many interests and needs involved to do anything other than to acknowledge that things aren’t working right and start making careful changes and judge how those changes play out. Prop “L” is a necessary first step to make SFMTA (Muni) a transportation resource for the future.

    Like

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