SF’s effort to reduce car trips from new development advances

By Joshua Sabatini : sfexaminer – excerpt

After a nearly two-year effort, San Francisco is poised to require developers to add a host of measures to reduce car trips from new developments.

The proposal, the Transportation Demand Management program, had stalled before the Board of Supervisors Land Use and Transportation Committee last year with outstanding concerns from nonprofits or smaller developers over the impacts of the new requirement.

But on Monday, after a number of amendments, the legislation was approved by a unanimous vote from committee members Supervisors Malia Cohen, Aaron Peskin and Jeff Sheehy. The full board will vote on the proposal next week… (more)

We know that these amendments are supposed to be for new residents moving into the new developments, but we also know that once the SFMTA gets the right to do anything, especially if it makes it into the General Plan Amendments, they will push the restrictions further into other neighborhoods by doing “studies” that “prove” their plan works, whether or not it does. We have already seen the results of the General Plan being used to cut down any and all arguments. We don’t need any more general plan amendments.

As I also mentioned in a letter to the Board of Supervisors, we should not continue to add more surveillance and scanning devices to our streets, as the data they are gathering can be used against us. We already have lost too much personal privacy and we don’t need to lose any more.

No New Measures Planned To Prevent Drivers From Entering Sunset Tunnel

by Saul Sugarman : hoodiine – excerpt

colevalleyportal

I can see the problem. The “Do not Enter” sign is poorly placed between the two streets. It appears to apply to Carl Street, not the paved street going into the tunnel. They could try to move the sign to the other side of the walkway and put on on both sides of the tunnel. They could also apply some red paint to it.

N-Judah riders have already suffered their fair share of delays in 2017 thanks to wayward drivers who try to make it through the Muni-only Sunset Tunnel. Two attempts to cross the dark corridor have gone down just this month.

Thankfully, no one has been injured in the past seven years, but for now, the SFMTA has no plans to remedy the problem. Agency spokesman Paul Rose said efforts made this past year — including the installation of speed bumps and “DO NOT ENTER” signs at either end of the tunnel — should be enough to deter confused drivers.

“It’s a situation we’ll continue to monitor and make adjustments to in order to prevent and minimize the impacts of cars being stuck in or outside the tunnel,” Rose said.

He noted there have been approximately 24 attempts to cross the tunnel since 2010. In addition to the signs and bumps, gates on either end remain closed when Muni is not in service… (more)

They should try the Red Paint treatment there. It’s hard to imagine that they can’t figure out some way to point the drivers in the right direction. maybe they need better easier to navigate other streets nearby. A wide, clearly lit street that looks driver friendly. Ask a driver, not SFMTA staff to figure it out how to direct traffic.

Backpacks On Public Transit: Agencies, Commuters Weigh In

by Saul Sugarman : hoodline – excerpt

We’ve all been there: you’re having a pleasant ride on a Bay Area train or bus, only to get rudely smacked by someone’s bag.

SFMTA and BART officials have received complaints about the problem, but “of course” there is no direct policy to address it, said BART spokeswoman Alicia Trost.

However, her agency has put posters in many BART cars asking riders to please remove their bags and put them between their legs, she noted.

“It is an absolute fact: if everyone took their backpacks off and put their bags between their legs, we could fit more people on our train cars,” Trost said.

Some forthcoming BART cars offer remedies to the bag issue, she added. The agency’s “Fleet Of The Future” cars, a $2.6 billion project set to debut later this year, will have added room underneath seats for passengers to store their bags. And a new extension to Antioch will have cars that have luggage racks… (more)

I heard that schools no longer have lockers so student must carry everything in backpacks. When you force people into contraptions without seats and with no real consideration into what people need to carry with them, you should anticipate a lot of extra stuff on the bus.

When you expect everyone to use public transit for all their errands your virtual reality designs should anticipate a lot of stuff will accompany the passengers.

You must expect a lot of backpacks, baby carriage, grocery bags and luggage, along with the every present bikes and skateboards and every other imaginable personal items that people would normally put in a car or other personal vehicle if they had one to carry their stuff in.

I’ve got an idea for you, instead of having special compartments and special sections for putting the stuff, why don’t you just return the seats to the buses and make sure that everyone can sit comfortably with their stuff in their laps like they used to.

Leave it up to the SFMTA to take a system that works and screw it up!

Taraval “Improvements” coming to Taraval and how you can comment on them

The Supervisors to contact about this plan are:
D-7 Supervisor Eric Mar: Eric.L.Mar@sfgov.org
D-4 Supervisor Katy Tang:  Katy.Tang@sfgov.org

Hello Supporters of Keeping Our L Taraval Stops:
Here are some of the “Improvements” coming to Taraval and how you can comment on them. 

Many of you have : seen the signs posted on various corners and the big electric signs flashing that changes are coming.  We wanted to update you on he details so you will know what to expect on Taraval Street and where you may go to comment on them:
http://stopsfmta.com/wp/4-tep-projects/taraval/

1.  Stop Removal:  Over the objections of a large portion of the Taraval Community, on February 25, 2017, SFMTA is going to remove the following eight L Taraval stops:
•    inbound, towards downtown: Taraval at 24th & at 28th (Post Office stop) Avenues; and Ulloa at 15th Avenue;
•    outbound, towards the ocean:  Ulloa at 15th Avenue; Taraval at 17th (Safeway stop), 22nd (Library stop), 28th (Post Office), & 35th Avenues.
•    Massive community support for the Taraval and 17th Avenue stops where Safeway is located convinced the SFMTA Board of Directors to try to keep the inbound stop heading downtown, so for now it is not being removed.

2.  Clear Zones & Lost Parking Starting on January 23, SFMTA began rolling out  the creation of “clear zones” (i.e., no curbside parking) and the loss of the following 81 parking spots on Taraval at L stops where concrete boarding islands will be built in 2018:

image

(more)

 

After tussle with bike-share startup, San Francisco says it’s sick of disruption

When their shifts end, Uber drivers set up camp in parking lots

By Eric Newcomer and Olivia Zaleski : chicagotribune – excerpt

In the 1970s, the Safeway grocery store in San Francisco’s gleaming Marina neighborhood, known as the Social Safeway, was a cornerstone of the pre-Tinder dating scene. Armistead Maupin made it famous in his 1978 book, Tales of the City, calling it “the hottest spot in town” to meet people. For years afterward, locals called it the “Singles Safeway” or the “Dateway.”

Forty years later, German Tugas, a 42-year-old Uber driver, got to know it for another reason: Its parking lot was a safe spot to sleep in his car. Most weeknights, Tugas drives over 70 hours a week in San Francisco, where the work is steadier and fares are higher than in his hometown, Sacramento. So every Monday morning, Tugas leaves at 4 a.m., says goodbye to his wife and four daughters, drives 90 miles to the city, and lugs around passengers until he earns $300 or gets too tired to keep going. (Most days he nets $230 after expenses like gas.) Then, he and at least a half dozen other Uber drivers gathered in the Social Safeway parking lot to sleep in their cars before another long day of driving… (more)

What do Uber drivers in San Francisco have in common with San Jose cops? They both sleep in parking lots.

Permanent street parking eyed for shared cars

By Jerold Chinn : sfbay – excerpt

“There’s a fundamental sense of inequity.”

San Francisco’s transportation agency is contemplating whether to make its on-street car-sharing parking program permanent.

Last Friday, the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency released its findings on a two-year pilot that allowed three car-sharing companies – City CarShare, Getaround and Zipcar – to use 200 curbside parking spaces throughout The City.

Andy Thornley of the SFMTA’s Sustainable Streets Division, shared the findings at the transit agency’s Policy And Governance Committee last Friday with some promising results…

There were some setbacks for both City CarShare and Getaround when it came to the availability of vehicles because of vandalism, theft or attempted theft of car-sharing vehicles, the report said.

The availability of Getaround vehicles were also affected because the company does not own its own fleet, as it is a peer-to-peer concept where the company relies on vehicle owners to make them available for members.

Construction and street closures also played a role in putting car-sharing parking spaces offline, said Thornley…

“You have turned a piece of the public realm into a private spot for an individual who lives in the neighborhood and that’s pretty perverse…

Currently, the car-sharing companies can remain in the designated car-sharing parking space even during street sweeping days as long as they clean and maintain the parking spaces themselves.

Peskin said this was giving preferential treatment to the companies and it was not fair for residents who get up early in the morning to move their vehicles while car-sharing vehicles can remain at the curbside parking space:

“There’s a fundamental sense of inequity.”

Read the full pilot evaluation on the SFMTA’s website... (more)

Inequality equals discrimination and that is not legal. Ever wonder why the SFMTA costs the city more than any other in legal settlements? This is one of the reasons. Must be nice to have access to unlimited legal funds. How long can city afford to defend the SFMTA and protect the uninsured, undocumented, and homeless residents they have promised to support?

How smart are these SMART systems that are disrupting our city for the benefit of the few?

Traffic Flow Change – Terry A. Francois Blvd. and 3rd Street

3rdstbridgeTraffic stopped for boat entering Mission Creek

“Port Planning has been working with SFMTA staff on the Terry Francois Boulevard (TFB) Cycletrack which will eventually include a bike lane on the Lefty O’Doul Bridge (the bridge at 3rd Street). The bike lanes will solve several issues including removal of the middle double lane on the bridge that has been difficult to manage and dangerous.  Unfortunately removal of this lane will result in the removal of the left turn lane onto TFB from southbound Third Street.

“I’m told that installation of the bike lanes are still at least 12 months out, but the SFMTA board has approved removal of the left turn lane for safety reasons.   SFMTA has agreed to not move forward with removal of the turn lane until Mission Rock Street is open to the public which we don’t believe will occur before March.  Once I receive more information on the timing of this work, I will pass it along as well as a contact for SFMTA should you have any questions regarding the project.”

Uber pays $20 million to settle claims of driver deception

Associated Press – excerpt

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Uber Technologies is paying $20 million to settle allegations that it duped people into driving for its ride-hailing service with false promises about how much they would earn and how much they would have to pay to finance a car.

The agreement announced Thursday with the Federal Trade Commission covers statements Uber made from late 2013 until 2015 while trying to recruit more drivers to expand its service and remain ahead of its main rival, Lyft.

The FTC alleged that most Uber drivers were earning far less in 18 major U.S. cities than Uber published online. Regulators also asserted that drivers wound up paying substantially more to lease cars than the company had claimed… (more)

Thousands hold hands to protest President Trump on Golden Gate Bridge

Bay City News : abc7news – excerpt

SAN FRANCISCO —
Thousands of people gathered to form a human chain on the sidewalk across the Golden Gate Bridge Friday morning.

Sausalito-based Bridge Together Golden Gate said the two-hour event beginning at 10 a.m., an hour after President Donald Trump was inaugurated, was not considered a protest, but an expression of unity.

Organizers said it would be the first human chain across the iconic span and beyond…

Parking lots at each end of the bridge will be significantly impacted by the protest…

“Seeing a lot of people lining up across Golden Gate- so far only traffic disruptions have been parking lot closures.” – Alexis Smith

Controlling the movement of humans is the first step to authoritarian rule. By removing our ability to move ourselves and subjecting us to using public transportation the government can limit our access to only areas they want us to go. Here is the proof.
There is an effort being put forth in Sacramento that would restrict the rights of persons under the age of 20 to drive a car by placing limits on their use of private vehicles. This is the first step to controlling private citizens ability to move about freely.