City says Central Subway contractor laid down 3.2 miles of the wrong kind of track, prompting new delay

By Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez : sfexaminer – excerpt

Construction contractors on the $1.6 billion Central Subway project laid down 3.2 miles of the wrong kind of steel track, The City is alleging in a letter obtained by the San Francisco Examiner.

In the April 19 letter, The City ordered contractor Tutor Perini to pull out that track and lay higher-strength steel down in its place.

San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency staff wrote to Tutor Perini alleging the contractor laid down 17,000 linear feet of “standard strength” steel, allegedly violating a contract with The City calling for “high strength” steel. The SFMTA said the higher-strength steel was selected to last longer before maintenance is required.

“This is not a safety issue,” SFMTA spokesperson Paul Rose wrote in a statement. But it may lead to another Central Subway delay…(more)

We appreciate the work the Supervisors have done on implementing their ability to review and possibly reverse some SFMTA Board decisions. Now can we figure out a way to take away their SFMTA contracts and oversight on construction projects next? San Francisco taxpayers are not getting the value they deserve from the SFMTA when they repeatedly mismanage projects as they have done with this one.

A while ago we were looking at the horrible slalom run on Potrero Avenue and the excuse we got for those mistakes was that there was no full time project manager on the job. It seems they had one project manager assigned to two projects at the same time.

What more reason do we have to stop adding new projects and digging up more streets before the ones underway are complete? And don’t tell us the funding depends on it. That excuse has no validity coming from the insatiable SFMTA.

Seconds for safety: SFMTA increases crosswalk times citywide

by Nathan Falstreau : hoodline – excerpt

Today, nonprofit Senior and Disability Action (SDA) and the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) announced a citywide increase in crossing times at signaled crosswalks.

At an event at Geary Boulevard and Presidio, District 1 Supervisor Sandra Lee Fewer and representatives from the SFMTA joined community members and staff from SDA and Walk SF to commemorate the move… (move)

Great. It was about time. Now, if we could only get longer consistent yellow light times as well, we would see a lot less accidents. Traffic people should drive to set the rules for drivers. Drivers drive into the future and must anticipate what will happen to prepare for it. The longer the signals last, the more time everyone on the street will have to decide when to stop with less stress.