Bill to Allow Cyclists to Roll Through Stop Signs Fails

Bike crossing on Panhandle path en mass at traffic light – photo by zrants.

A proposal to allow bikes to roll through intersections has come to a skidding stop — for now.

AB 1103 would have let bicyclists treat stop signs like yield signs. On Monday, the measure stalled in committee.

The American Automobile Association opposes the measure, as does the California Police Chief’s Association.

Supporters of the measure are holding off until next year when they plan to re-introduce the bill. They decided they needed more time to convince their fellow lawmakers… (more)

Everyone is safest when we all follow the same rules.

 

 

Mayor Steinberg’s driver hits midtown biker

On a trip between City Hall and a school board meeting on Tuesday evening, Mayor Darrell Steinberg’s driver hit a bicyclist at a notoriously hazardous intersection in midtown.

The mayor’s staff said there were no serious injuries and the mayor was not driving when the accident occurred near the intersection of 24th and G streets.

The incident occurred at an intersection with a two-way stop. The mayor’s Ford Fusion didn’t have a stop sign, but a cyclist coming from 24th Street ran the stop sign, said Zachary Yeates, a Steinberg staffer who was in the car…

Hansen confirmed that he intended to ask the city traffic engineer to conduct “an immediate investigation” and “quickly make changes if warranted.” Hansen said that he’s also pushing to educate bikers on following traffic laws, and that it would take both a “culture change” and infrastructure improvements for Sacramentans to successfully share roads(more)

California bicyclists would be allowed to roll past stop signs under proposed law

By sfexaminer – excerpt

Cyclists in California would be allowed to pedal past stop signs — without stopping — under legislation proposed by two lawmakers who say it would make the roads safer.

The two-tiered approach to the rules of the road — one for cyclists and one for cars — is unlikely to ease growing tensions over sharing California’s roadways.

Bike advocates have won such victories in the Statehouse as requiring drivers to yield a three-foot radius of manoeuvring room to cyclists or face fines. Motorists meanwhile have expressed frustration that they see certain cyclists pick and choose which laws to follow.

Assemblymen Jay Obernolte (R-Hesperia) and Phil Ting (D-San Francisco) introduced their measure on Friday that would allow bicyclists to treat stop signs as merely yield signs — proceeding with caution if conditions are safe.

In effect, it would legalize the so-called California roll, although just for bicyclists…(more)

This law AB-1103 Bicycles: yielding has been through the legislature a number of times and has not passed yet. It will create more problems than it will solve and is not supported by all cyclists:

  1. Will this apply to 2-way stop signs or just 4-way stop signs? How will cyclists know the difference?
  2. Does anyone think cyclists will slow down more than they do now to look before “rolling” through?
  3. Legislators should include a clause that requires cyclists to purchase licenses and insurance to cover damages resulting from passage of this new law.
  4. This will be particularly difficult for drivers of large vehicles like buses and trucks, who can’t easily see bikes or stop on a dime when they do.
  5. How can SFMTA speed buses though intersections when they must worry about hitting cyclists rolling through stop signs?
  6. This will negatively impact the safety of other cyclists, pedestrians, tourists and young people who will find it even more confusing to walk safely on the streets than they do now.
  7. Wait for the lawsuits to come in.

Details on the AB-1103 – An act to amend Section 21200 of the Vehicle Code, relating to bicycles – Introduced by Assembly Members Obernolte and Ting (Coauthors: Assembly Members Bloom, Chávez, and Kiley)

Principal coauthor: Senator Wiener

Open letter to Supervisor Weiner

Dear Scott,

Please do not close Noe and Sanchez Streets to left turns onto Market.

There are so few ways to access Market Street; since I’ve lived here we’ve closed off McCoppin, Octavia, Buchanan, Dolores, Church, and Castro Streets to turns onto Market.
As a result, 15th St., 16th St., Sanchez and Noe are often congested 2-3 blocks to get onto Market.
Drivers flood the Duboce Triangle and the Castro trying to go around.

What problem are we trying to solve?

Pedestrian jay-walking is epidemic in the Castro as are bicycle red-light runners.  The recent brown paint  encourages pedestrian to wait in the middle of the street.  See attached photos.

But SFPD does not dare enforce, due to severe backlash from SFBC, and lack of support from both the command staff and city government (according to multiple friends who are officers, and wish to remain anonymous).  Currently peds and bikes get a pass.  But Vision Zero will only work if everyone is accountable.

• We support a left turn arrow from westbound 16th St. to westbound Market St., often backed up 2 blocks / 6 light cycles / 10 minutes.
• We also support the idea of an all-way pedestrian crossing light at Noe/16th/Market, just as we currently have in the Financial District.
• We oppose turn restrictions from Noe and Sanchez Streets.

Sincerely,

—Jamey Frank,

Church Street Neighborhood Association

 

A rightful veto of rolling stops for San Francisco bike riders

Editorial : sfchronicle – excerpt

San Francisco’s transportation world makes it easy to skip driving and ride a bike instead. But safety, not convenience, remains a priority — as Mayor Ed Lee rightly noted in vetoing a plan that would have allowed cyclists to roll through stop signs.

The mayor’s stance, which he made clear weeks ago, should end a shortsighted idea that endangers cyclists, pedestrians and drivers. The Board of Supervisors approved the sliding stops by a 6-5 vote. A veto override would take eight votes…

San Francisco has ambitions to cut street deaths and injuries by adopting a far-ranging Vision Zero plan that focuses on accident-prone intersections, slows driving speeds and protects pedestrians. Cyclists have a stake in all these goals, and halting at stop signs should be included… (more)

Police captain against Bike Yield Law

By  : sfexaminer – excerpt

The man who started the “bike crackdown,” ramping up ticketing of cyclists rolling slowly through stop signs or blowing red lights, has now come out publicly against the proposed Bike Yield Law.

San Francisco Police Department Captain John Sanford, who heads Park Station near the Panhandle, torched the new law in his newest Park Station Newsletter.

“Being such a dense city, with so many visitors and distracted drivers, I will never be convinced it is safe to disobey any of the traffic laws, especially stop signs and red lights,” Sanford wrote in the newsletter.

The Bike Yield Law was proposed by Supervisor John Avalos, and was passed on first reading at the Board of Supervisors without a veto-proof majority. It will be voted on a second and final time Jan. 12. Mayor Ed Lee vowed to veto it.

The law would task the SFPD with deprioritizing enforcement of cyclists who safely yield at stop signs, and come to a full stop if they see autos or pedestrians. If neither are present, cyclists may roll through the intersection without stopping…

The man who started the “bike crackdown,” ramping up ticketing of cyclists rolling slowly through stop signs or blowing red lights, has now come out publicly against the proposed Bike Yield Law.

San Francisco Police Department Captain John Sanford, who heads Park Station near the Panhandle, torched the new law in his newest Park Station Newsletter.

“Being such a dense city, with so many visitors and distracted drivers, I will never be convinced it is safe to disobey any of the traffic laws, especially stop signs and red lights,” Sanford wrote in the newsletter.

The Bike Yield Law was proposed by Supervisor John Avalos, and was passed on first reading at the Board of Supervisors without a veto-proof majority. It will be voted on a second and final time Jan. 12. Mayor Ed Lee vowed to veto it.

The law would task the SFPD with deprioritizing enforcement of cyclists who safely yield at stop signs, and come to a full stop if they see autos or pedestrians. If neither are present, cyclists may roll through the intersection without stopping… (more)

Maybe the recent media coverage about the strong police presence around the wiggle is causing cyclists to drive more carefully through those intersections, making them safer.

Supes approve rolling bicycle stop law but mayor to veto

By Joshua Sabatini : sfexaminer – excerpt

San Francisco’s proposal to allow bicycles to roll through stop signs without fear of being ticketed was approved Tuesday ­­— but without a veto­-proof majority.

And Mayor Ed Lee plans to live up to his promise to veto the legislation…

“The mayor believes this endangers pedestrians and other cyclists and he said he will veto it in the interest of public safety,” mayoral spokeswoman Christine Falvey said after the Board of Supervisors approved the legislation in a 6­-5 vote.

It takes eight votes to override a mayoral veto.

Supervisor John Avalos, who introduced the legislation, voted in support, along with supervisors Jane Kim, Scott Wiener, Eric Mar, David Campos and London Breed.

Voting in opposition to the law were supervisors Aaron Peskin, Malia Cohen, Mark Farrell, Katy Tang and Norman Yee…

The legislation would officially make citing bicyclists for not coming to complete stops at stop signs the lowest enforcement priority. Bicyclists would have to slow to a safe speed of under 6 miles per hour and yield the right­-of­-way to any other vehicle or pedestrian in the intersection.

A second board vote will be taken on the legislation next month. The mayor would then have 10 days to veto it… (more)

KTVU Stays Classy With Fearmongering Segment on “Bike Yield Law”

by  sf.streetsblog – excerpt

What KTVU’s sensationalistic bike coverage lacks in integrity, it compensates for in consistency. The Fox affiliate’s segment on the proposed “Bike Yield Law” yesterday kept the bar low in manufacturing controversy, featuring a bedside interview with a single mother recovering from injuries after being hit by a bicycle rider earlier that day… (more)
http://www.ktvu.com/news/23500593-video