Ask Ed Reiskin

What’s next at SFMTA? Tomorrow is your chance to call into KQED Forum and ask Ed Reiskin some of those questions you have been wanting to ask regarding the state of the SFMTA and his roll in making it what it is today. Ed is scheduled to be on KQED Forum Friday, March 8 at 10 AM and you may call in with questions at: 866 733-6786  or email the Forum program: forum@kqed.org

 

 

 

 

Will a “front door” help San Francisco steer the stampede of emerging technologies testing on its streets?

By Hannah Norman : bizjournals – excerpt

Electric scooters. Delivery robots. Uber and Lyft. Even the soon-to-be shuttered van service Chariot started operating without the approval of San Francisco, with city policies as a secondary thought.

Now San Francisco, which has been ground zero for many emerging technologies, is looking to better keep tabs on the various startups keen on testing or operating their new products in the city. After six months of meetings attended by representatives from over 100 companies, city agencies, think tanks and community organizations, a new report was released Thursday by the Emerging Technology Open Working Group, led by city administrator Naomi Kelly.

“It is clear that technology is part of the social fabric of life in San Francisco,” the report says. “Yet as keepers of the public right-of-way and other public spaces, we must develop appropriate policy measures to mitigate risks and unintended impacts on San Franciscans and our infrastructure.”

The report will next be presented to city’s board of supervisors, likely sometime in January, followed by a hearing… (more)

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New Laws for cyclists in 2019

By Robert Montano : fresnobee – excerpt

Each new year brings change to the California Vehicle Code. Many of these changes will have a significant impact on roadway safety. Californians are fortunate to have Legislators who work to identify and respond to the evolving trends of traffic safety. This year, we see changes to helmet use on bicycles, motorized scooters and the expansion of the hit-and-run offense within bicycle paths (lanes). Here are highlights on several of these new laws:

Helmet use on motorized scooters (AB 2989, Flora): Bicycle helmets are no longer required for riders of motorized scooters who are age 18 or older. Motorized scooters may operate within a bicycle path and on highways with speed limits up to 25 mph. Local jurisdictions may pass ordinances to allow motorized scooters on highways with speed limits up to 35 miles per hour. However, it is still illegal to operate a motorized scooter on a sidewalk.

Bicycle hit-and-run on bicycle path (AB 1755, Steinorth): The provisions of the felony hit-and-run law have been extended to cyclists traveling along bicycle paths. Currently, in the California Vehicle Code, a motor vehicle driver involved in a collision resulting in death or injury to another party is required to stop at the scene. AB 1755 clarifies that the same vehicle code also applies to bicyclists who cause injury-related collisions… (more)

Small businesses along San Francisco’s Van Ness corridor are suffering because of a major city road project.

abcnews – excerpt (includes video)

https://abc7news.com/video/embed/?pid=4545701

Small businesses along San Francisco’s Van Ness corridor are suffering because of a major city road project.

After three years in business, Masaye Waugh says she’s shaking off her losses and closing out for good at The Bootleg Bar & Kitchen…

Waugh says the City offered her free advertising on the side of buses, as long as she paid to print the banners. But, that cost $1,200, which Waugh says she didn’t have, since her bar has been losing money all year…

She wrote a letter to Mayor London Breed and Supervisors Aaron Peskin and Catherine Stefani, and said “they didn’t have much response.”

In that letter, she spelled out 15 common sense demands to help businesses survive the construction. She also says she is organizing a rally at City Hall on Tuesday, October 30 at 2:30 pm.

Read the full letter here(more)

What a deal.  Free advertising? “Bring your earplugs and dust masks to our Van Ness construction zone bars and restaurants. Leave your high heels at home. Heavy boots and causal wear advised. Hard hats optional.”

Come to the City Hall rally on Tuesday to support the Businesses that are dying thanks to the poorly executed Van Ness Corridor project that is killing businesses in its wake. Stop the destruction before they come for you!

 

 

As Cities Push Back Against E-Scooters, One Company Launches “GovTech Platform”

By Ben Miller : govtech – excerpt

The e-scooter company Bird’s offering is tailored toward some of the exact complaints of cities like San Francisco and San Jose.

First, the companies came in and deployed fleets of electric scooters on the street for anybody to ride with the touch of a button.

Next, the complaints started to bubble to the surface: Riders were being unsafe. They were leaving scooters in the way of pedestrians on the sidewalk. The companies weren’t asking permission from city governments to operate.

Then the cities started pushing back. Some created a new permit for scooters and made the companies promise to follow rules and encourage safe riding. Some enacted temporary bans… (more)

Meet the man who says he can fix Muni. For real.

By Joe Eskenazi : mssionlocal – excerpt

‘Retired civil servant’ Mike Cheney’s plan is so not-crazy, it just might work

“Dude, do you know how much those things cost me? Apiece?” This is a de facto rhetorical question from Mike Cheney. Most are. He immediately answers it. “Eleven bucks! Eleven!”

That’s a fair amount of money to spend for a retired Muni diesel mechanic with multiple grandchildren — but if it leads to one of this city’s most intractable problems being solved, it’ll be worth it.

So, that’s why Cheney prepared a comprehensive “2018 Proposal To Re-align Muni Goals & Operations,” printed up a handful of $11-a-pop copies, and hand-delivered a few of the svelte, 21-page booklets to the office of Mayor London Breed. That’s her quote right on the cover: “Muni has to work well for the people of San Francisco, so that it is their first option.”….

What if it turned out Muni could speed up buses and trains — and wouldn’t even need to buy new equipment, tear up the streets, or even eliminate stops?

Well, it can. It could install skip-stop route schedules.

This is a system in which Bus A picks up passengers at Stops 1, 3, 5, 7 and so on and Bus B picks up passengers at Stops 2, 4, 6, and 8. This has worked all around the world; it increases capacity and speeds up service… (more)

Please read the article and comment on the source. The Fix Muni First folks will appreciate the low cost method suggested here to solve the crowded bus and speed problems and the money watchers will appreciate the savings, that could lower riders fees and/or finance more routes.

This plan seems to cover everyone’s needs except the corporate entities planning to take over and control our streets. Residents and merchants appreciate the lack of Red Lane constraints, and Muni drivers should be less stressed as well.

Mike’s ideas sound too good and lack the sexy street diets favored at the SFMTA Board. Who are our elected officials going to serve, the public, or the corporations? Will our Mayor appoint a true visionary with a lifetime of Muni experience like Mike Cheney to the MTA Board our will she select a corporate shill intent on retaining the failed policies that are driving people off the public buses into their vehicles?

Some other suggestions that are drawing a lot of public support for safer conditions on our streets:

  • Return consistency to the streets of San Francisco. Nobody can watch for pedestrians, scooters, bikes, cars, trucks and buses weaving in and out of lanes while reading street signs and directions.
  • Lanes need to be straight and flow smoothly from one block to the next. Following lane changes is creates additional distractions.
  • Bring back the safer one-way streets with predictable curbside bus stops.
  • Extend the timing of yellow lights and hold the red light for a couple of seconds before turning it to green to give stragglers a little more time to clear the intersection.

 

Scooter crash with serious injuries revives calls for boardwalk ban A man rides a motorized scooter in San Diego

By David Garrick : sandiegouniontribune – excerpt

A man whose daughter and ex-wife suffered serious injuries in a scooter crash over the weekend lobbied San Diego City Council members on Tuesday to revive a scooter boardwalk ban they rejected last month.

“The beach boardwalk is not an appropriate place for such high-speed, non-regulated motorized scooters,” said Dan Dewitt, predicting that more serious injuries will happen unless the city cracks down.

Council members on May 22 rejected a proposed ban on using motorized scooters anywhere on the boardwalks in Mission Beach, Pacific Beach, Mission Bay and La Jolla. The council vote was 6-3…

Dewitt’s daughter and ex-wife lost control of their rented scooter on Saturday while trying to weave through pedestrians on the Mission Beach boardwalk near Santa Barbara Place, just north of the community’s iconic roller coaster.

His daughter, 11, suffered a ruptured spleen, abdominal bleeding and a head injury, Dewitt said. Her mother fractured her skull in multiple places, he said.

“I’ve been a firefighter for 17 years and these injuries are worse than most automobile accidents that I’ve responded to,” said Dewitt, who lives in Arizona and rushed to San Diego after the crash involving his family… (more)

Serious injuries are not sufficient data to ban a vehicle from sidewalks? How many injuries will it take to hit the data target?

S.F. Will Be Scooter-Free While City Chooses Permit Holders

By Ida Mojadad : sfweekly – excerpt

Sidewalks will be largely free of scooters in June, while SFMTA demands tech companies abide with a new permit program.

Starting June 4, San Francisco will go nearly a month without seeing scooters on its sidewalks, city officials announced Thursday.

Any shared electric scooters found on the sidewalks after June 4 will be confiscated and used as evidence, City Attorney Dennis Herrera says Thursday. In turn, the San Francisco Municipal Transit Agency is accepting permit applications for a 12-month pilot program and hope to issue the permits by the end of June… (more)

 

Seconds for safety: SFMTA increases crosswalk times citywide

by Nathan Falstreau : hoodline – excerpt

Today, nonprofit Senior and Disability Action (SDA) and the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) announced a citywide increase in crossing times at signaled crosswalks.

At an event at Geary Boulevard and Presidio, District 1 Supervisor Sandra Lee Fewer and representatives from the SFMTA joined community members and staff from SDA and Walk SF to commemorate the move… (move)

Great. It was about time. Now, if we could only get longer consistent yellow light times as well, we would see a lot less accidents. Traffic people should drive to set the rules for drivers. Drivers drive into the future and must anticipate what will happen to prepare for it. The longer the signals last, the more time everyone on the street will have to decide when to stop with less stress.

Another pedestrian breaks leg on yellow curbside bumps

By Gary Richards, Roadshow : mercurynews – excerpt

This is a response to your article about people slipping on those yellow buttons at crosswalks. On Feb. 26 at around 7 a.m. I was heading to work at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation when I slipped on the yellow sidewalk bumps and fractured both my tibia and fibula…

This is the second such incident reported to Roadshow where a person slipped like this and broke their leg. Keith says he is considering filing a claim against Palo Alto.

These are “truncated domes,” which are typically located at the bottom of curb ramps and have been required by federal law since 1991 to give warning to the visually impaired that they are leaving the sidewalk and entering the street. Their design is stipulated to include traction-enhancing features on the top of each dome to minimize slipping… (more)

The design is obviously flawed because hundreds of people fall on them. Even some bikes go down. Another dumb idea that got sold to the government that needs to go.