Want to Ease Parking in Your Neighborhood? Join Our Open Houses

by Pamela Johnson : sfmta – excerpt

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Residential parking is an issue in any crowded city, and San Francisco is no different. But while San Francisco’s Residential Parking Permit program hasn’t changed much since it began in 1976, the city has. That’s why we’re continuing our community meetings to address the natural questions: does the program still work? And if not, what changes could make it work better?..

The SFMTA would like to hear from you! We hope you can attend one or more of these upcoming workshops to discuss San Francisco’s neighborhood parking.

5/3/2015 6 to 8 PM San Francisco Day School 350 Masonic Avenue
5/4/2016 6 to 8 PM Calvary Presbyterian Church 2515 Fillmore Street
5/9/2016 6 to 8 PM Richmond Rec Center  251 18th Avenue
5/10/2016 6 to 8 PM Grace Lutheran 3201 Ulloa Street
5/18/2016 6 to 8 PM CCSF Chinatown/North Beach 628 Washington Street
5/19/2016 6 to 8 PM CCSF Mission Campus, Room 109 1125 Valencia Street
5/23/2016 6 to 8 PM St. Stephen Catholic Parish 475 Eucalyptus Drive
5/25/2016 6 to  8 PM Minnie Lovie Ward Rec Center 650 Capitol Avenue
6/1/2016 6 to 8 PM St. Anthony’s 150 Golden Gate Avenue
6/2/2016 6 to 8 PM CCSF South East Campus 1800 Oakdale Avenue
 6/8/2016 6:30 to 8:30 PM Harvey Milk Arts Center 50 Scott Street

If you can’t make it, you can also provide feedback to:

Kathryn Studwell
Program Manager of Residential Permit Parking
InfoRPP@sfmta.com (more)

More changes to be ignored?

After removal of hundreds of parking spaces both on and off street, and new laws that limit building new parking spaces, it is pretty disingenuous of the SFMTA to ask how the parking is in San Francisco. If anyone wants to know how the parking removal is effecting SF businesses, you can watch the April 25th Small Business Commission meeting tapes for a pretty common description of how bad business is after the SFMTA establishes its plan on your streets. It sucks!

We know the SFMTA plan is to put parking meters, or should I say, “park by phone only” (http://enufsf.com/) options on all the San Francisco streets so you will have to constantly play musical parking chairs. STOP THEM NOW. Sign the Stop SFMTA petition and find out about all the other petitions and opportunities to oppose the SFMTA plan to privatize our public streets. http://stopsfmta.com/wp/

 

SF looks to overhaul rules around residential parking permits

By : sfexaminer – excerpt

Whether it’s Captain & Tennille’s song “Muskrat Love,” or the “yabba dabba doo” of talking Fred Flintstone dolls, some creations of the 1970s belong in the 1970s.

Soon The City may add its parking permit rules to that list.

The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency ended the first public comment period on its “Residential Parking Permit Evaluation & Reform Project” this week, and planners are now looking to revisit permitted parking across San Francisco.

The City’s residential parking program was first drafted in 1976

Wilson said nighttime parking concerns are among many the SFMTA has heard. Printing out permits online, changing the amount motorcycles and scooters are charged, or potentially allowing greener vehicles to pay less than the $111 annual fee are among other ideas from neighbors.

“One thing we’ve heard from the outside is to try to do more tailoring for neighborhood use,” he said, which might mean rules can stretch or change between various neighborhoods like North Beach and the Excelsior.

“Right now it’s sort of a one-size-fits-all policy,” Wilson said…

The next round of public comment on residential parking is tentatively slated for April, when SFMTA staff will propose potential new ideas for permit parking to San Franciscans. The SFMTA Board of Directors could vote on proposals as early as fall.

Rules that could, perhaps, remain for another 40 years… (more)

Alcohol, Traffic Top Neighbors’ Concerns About Pro Soccer At Kezar Stadium

by Jonathan Gerfen :  hoodline – excerpt

As we reported yesterday, the new North American Soccer League has proposed to make Kezar Stadium the home field for its first West Coast professional team, the San Francisco Deltas.

If the proposal is approved by San Francisco Recreation and Parks, the Deltas would host 15-20 home games at Kezar Stadium, beginning in 2017. The games would mostly take place on Saturday evenings, with the occasional game on Wednesday evening or during the day on Saturday.

Representatives for the Deltas shared more details on their plans at a recent meeting of the Inner Sunset Park Neighbors. Though the team’s owner, Brian Andrés Helmick, was unable to attend due to an NASL event on the East Coast, director of stadium operations Alexis Haselberger and PR representative Sam Lauter were on-site to talk to neighbors. Both of them live within walking distance of Kezar, and made the case that they’ll also be affected by any changes.

As predicted, the two major topics of concern expressed by neighbors were the league’s request to sell alcohol during games, and how thousands of soccer fans coming to the games might impact traffic and parking issues in the neighborhood (more)

Critics file legal challenge of S.F. ‘Google Bus’ program

By Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez: sfexaminer – excerpt

San Francisco’s Commuter Shuttle Program, which was made permanent in November, is facing a lawsuit that could require The City to revisit its environmental studies.

The City’s new, permanent program to legalize “Google Buses” just netted its first legal challenge.

An environmental appeal of the Commuter Shuttle Program, as The City formally calls its legalization of tech shuttles, was filed to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors last Thursday.

A similar challenge was issued over the pilot version of the program previously, which then escalated into a lawsuit that’s still ongoing.

The lawsuit and the new environmental appeal, separately, may compel San Francisco to study various environmental effects of the buses it did not study — not necessarily to stop the program altogether…

“They’ve been too big for our streets, there are pollution concerns, and impacts to the public transportation system,” Peskin told the San Francisco Examiner. “I have an open mind, but like many San Franciscans I have concerns about them driving on our city streets.”…

The newfound permanency of the program opened it up to new legal challenges.

The Coalition for Fair, Legal and Environmental Transit, SEIU Local 1021, and citizens Sue Vaughan and Bob Planthold filed the challenge through their attorney, Rebecca Davis. The group alleges the shuttles are low-tech, using diesel fuel which pollutes the air around city neighbors, and that they illegally use public bus stops in conflict with the California Vehicle Code.

Tech workers will pay more to live near the shuttle stops, the group alleges, which in turn spikes nearby rents, spurring evictions and displacement of long-term San Franciscans… (more)

 

‘Airbnb for parking’ startup accelerates growth, spreading to seven cities

By Sara Castellanos : bizjournals – excerpt

The UpTake: Boston-based Spot Park, which officially launched its mobile app for iOS and Android last summer, plans to expand to Chicago, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., Miami, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Seattle this year… (more)

Stay tuned… they will soon be joined by many more hopeful apps out to steal your parking bucks from the SFMTA.

The Solution to San Francisco’s Parking Problem isn’t What You Expect

by Noah Sanders : thebolditalic – excerpt

Let’s be frank: parking in San Francisco is a nightmare. We’re a dense city — more than 800,000 people on a seven by seven spit of land — with a surprisingly low number of on-street public parking spaces (265,000 as reported in 2010), and the quest to find an open slot for your vehicle can be one of the great frustrations of living in the City by the Bay. Parking isn’t a simple issue (nothing is in San Francisco), but according to the Examinercity supervisors Mark Farrell and Malia Cohen think a large part of our current parking crisis is due to ubiquitous construction parking permits. You’ve seen them: plasticky, red-and-white signs decreeing a rare stretch of available parking is reserved for the dualies and cement mixers of some massive construction project. Anyone who ignores the signs is asking for punishment. Now, supervisors Farrell and Cohen believe they have a solution: the Construction Parking Plan Law….

Potrero Hill Boosters president J.R. Eppler doesn’t see the Construction Parking Plan Law as an adequate solution to what he believes is a much bigger problem. Eppler says that parking problems caused by construction projects are just “a straw on the back of an already burdened camel.”…At the end of the day, “it’s not just a construction issue, “ Eppler says, it’s a complex parking issue that needs to be addressed with an equally comprehensive plan….

San Francisco is in the grip of some seriously complex growing pains, and though legislation like the Construction Parking Plan Law looks to address pieces of those problems, City Hall needs to start expanding its scope and hitting the full force of these issues head-on…. (more)

RELATED:
Luxury commuter buses hit bumps in SF

San Fran: Should Google Be Allowed to provide FREE Bus Rides for Its Employees–or do UNIONS Control All Transportation

By Stephen Frank   – excerpt

City Attorney’s office tries to stall Google Bus trial hearing 

By Joe Fitzgerald Rodrigue, SF Examiner, 3/15/15

Petitioners of a lawsuit against San Francisco’s commuter shuttle pilot program last week challenged a motion by the City Attorney’s Office to have more time to respond to the suit.

The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency created the pilot program last year to study the impact of the so-called Google Buses, private shuttles that transport tech workers to campuses around the region. The buses have attracted ire in San Francisco as symbols of tech-industry gentrification.

The Coalition for Fair Legal and Environmental Transit filed suit last year against Google, Apple, shuttle providers and The City to stall the program, alleging they failed to study impacts of exhaust in the air and stress on the asphalt. They also argue rents skyrocket near the shuttle stops, displacing people with the luck of living near them.

Last Wednesday’s filing came as Superior Court Judge Garrett L. Wong was on vacation. The trial is set for June, but the City Attorney’s Office pressed for a key pre-trial hearing on March 27 to be pushed back.

Wong will hear arguments Monday for rescheduling the hearing.

The effort to delay the hearing coincides with a State Assembly committee hearing on AB61, a bill which would legalize aspects of the commuter shuttle pilot program statewide. Approval by the committee may add legitimacy to the city attorney’s arguments that the pilot program is allowable, some insiders said…

… the bill’s language may in fact aid the petitioners’ case since it acknowledges that aspects of the shuttle pilot program are illegal… (more)

When you displace and inconvenience a majority of the population in order to privilege a minority group, you will not be welcome.  How many shuttles can San Francisco residents take?

Car Sharing Programs Need to Share Public Parking Spaces, Say Merchants

By Jessica Zimmer : potreroview – excerpt

As car sharing programs experience an increase in demand, Potrero Hill and Dogpatch merchants are concerned that the public parking spots set aside for the services are negatively impacting their customers and neighborhood traffic. 

In 2013 the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) approved a pilot project that created reserved parking spots for three roundtrip car share programs.  The project extends to 2016, and includes nonprofits City CarShare and Getaround, as well as ZipCar, a for-profit company. Pilot participants pay a monthly $225 fee for each of the reserved spots, are responsible for maintaining the spaces, as well as 25 feet in front of and behind them in lieu of street cleaning crews doing the work, and collect and share data with SFTMA about who uses the reserved spots and how. Car share users are required to bring the vehicles back to the reserved spots…. (more)

San Francisco Removing Dozens Of Parking Spaces In ‘Daylighting’ Plan To Improve Pedestrian Safety

cbslocal – excerpt

SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) – It’s getting harder for drivers to park in San Francisco, and it’s not just because of increased traffic. Some parking spots are actually disappearing, in the name of safety.

The Tenderloin is a tough neighborhood in just about every respect, and that includes parking. But in recent weeks, finding a space has become even tougher. “We call it daylighting,” said Tom Maguire of the SFMTA.

Daylighting is a fancy word for removing the parking spaces at busy pedestrian corners. The curb gets painted red at the former parking spot, the meter disappears. What’s left is what the city calls a safer intersection…

Frustrated drivers say they’re all for safety, but they’re also quick to point out that visibility is a two-way street. Joseph cited as an example pedestrians who are looking down at their phones. “Hey, you need to be paying attention to where you’re walking in society, period,” he said.

The city says safety comes first, and that means daylighting will come to a few more neighborhoods. “Places downtown, South of Market, in the Mission,” Maguire said… (more)

Parking crunch crimps growth at SF General

By Jerold Chinn : SFbay – excerpt

Parking at San Francisco General Hospital could soon get worse for patients and employees if a plan is not in place to figure out how the solve the parking situation, health officials said.  Health officials presented their dilemma to the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency’s Policy and Governance Committee last Friday seeking help from SFMTA staff to find solutions.

The Health Commission last Tuesday also passed a resolutions urging health officials to work collaboratively with the SFMTA find transportation and parking solutions for patients to access the hospital.

The hospital has been going through major renovations with a new hospital expected to open in December of this year and a proposed UCSF Research Building expected to open in 2019, said Kathy Jung, director of facilities and capital planning for the Department of Public Health.

Jung also said the hospital is planning to move its emergency care services from the south side to north side of campus, which will result in the loss of some parking: “Opening the new hospital and the changes to the campus that will follow have significant impact to the supply and demand of parking at SFGH.”

The hospital is expected to have an increase in demand and higher staffing levels once the new facilities are open, said Jung… (more)

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