Stop the Speed Camera Pilot Program in San Francisco and San Jose

STOP THE SPEED CAMERA BILL AB-342, AUTHORED BY DAVID CHIU.
SIGN THE PETITION. CALL AND EMAIL YOUR STATE REPRESENTATIVES IF YOU OBJECT TO A FIVE-YEAR PILOT PROGRAM IN SAN FRANCISCO AND SAN JOSE.

www.saferstreetsla.org has a full explanation of the bill, a petition to sign, and phone numbers of legislators to call. Call David Chiu at (916) 319-2017 and tell him you don’t appreciate him introducing legislation that takes away your rights!

Assemblymember David Chiu from San Francisco has introduced legislation to allow speed cameras to be used in California for the first time. The bill, AB-342 does not simply allow enforcement of speed laws using an automated enforcement system rather than a live police officer.

AB-342 drastically changes California speed laws and enforcement in very negative ways. While some might view the use of speed cameras as a tool in promoting roadway safety,

AB-342 is seriously flawed. It eliminates virtually all current protections afforded to motorists in speed related cases and allows jurisdictions to run speed traps in their cities, ensuring that the program will be used as a revenue generation scheme, not for public safety.

AB-342 makes the vehicle owner responsible for speeding tickets and takes away a defendant’s right to a trial. Instead, the ticket is treated as a civil violation which will be adjudicated in an administrative hearing without traditional due process rights.

Now sign the Petition to Protect Your Rights! Tell David Chiu you don’t appreciate his legislation that takes away your right to a trial, makes you responsible for the actions of others, and eliminates protections against cities running speed traps.

A BETTER CHEAPER SOLUTION TO SAFER DRIVING: EXTEND THE TIMING ON YELLOW LIGHTS TO GIVE PEOPLE MORE TIME TO STOP.

RELATED:
Violations Plummet with Longer Yellow Light Time

Uber’s Self-Driving Cars Still Need a Lot of Human Help

By Maya Kosoff : vanityfair – excerpt

They can barely go a mile without human intervention, according to leaked documents.

Travis Kalanick has described self-driving technology as “existential” to Uber’s future as a company. But according to recent internal documents obtained by Recode and BuzzFeed News, Uber is still nowhere close to having a fully autonomous vehicle. Recode reports that during the week ending March 8, Uber’s self-driving cars traveled, on average, just 0.8 miles on their own before a human had to take over, in a process known as “disengagement.” That Uber’s cars cannot travel a mile without human intervention does not bode particularly well for a company whose future is predicated on its self-driving technology… (more)

For San Franciscans With Suspended Licenses, Time For Traffic Ticket Amnesty Is Running Out

by Teresa Hammerl : hoodline – excerpt (video included)

Traffic Ticket Amnesty Program from SF OEWD on Vimeo.

Traffic Ticket Amnesty Program from SF OEWD on Vimeo.

Over 10,000 San Franciscans—many of whom live in the city’s lowest-income neighborhoods—have suspended driver’s licenses. Without the ability to drive, many have found it difficult to secure employment, take children to school, access social services, or even see family and friends.

Under an amnesty program signed into law by California Governor Jerry Brown, people with suspended licenses can get a second chance. Introduced in 2015, the program can reduce debt from unpaid traffic tickets incurred before 2013 by 50 or 80 percent, depending on a person’s income, and help offenders reinstate their driver’s licenses.

But on March 31st, the program will end—and local agencies are concerned that many who need it aren’t aware and have yet to take advantage.

Before the final deadline hits, the Office of Economic and Workforce Development (OEWD) and the Financial Justice Project (an initiative of the City Treasurer’s Office) have launched a multi-lingual outreach campaign to increase the number of residents who apply for the amnesty program.

“In San Francisco, we want to ensure that every resident affected has access to amnesty and equal access to job opportunities—leading to a pathway out of poverty,” said Todd Rufo, director of the OEWD, in a statement… (more)

 

Mayor Steinberg’s driver hits midtown biker

On a trip between City Hall and a school board meeting on Tuesday evening, Mayor Darrell Steinberg’s driver hit a bicyclist at a notoriously hazardous intersection in midtown.

The mayor’s staff said there were no serious injuries and the mayor was not driving when the accident occurred near the intersection of 24th and G streets.

The incident occurred at an intersection with a two-way stop. The mayor’s Ford Fusion didn’t have a stop sign, but a cyclist coming from 24th Street ran the stop sign, said Zachary Yeates, a Steinberg staffer who was in the car…

Hansen confirmed that he intended to ask the city traffic engineer to conduct “an immediate investigation” and “quickly make changes if warranted.” Hansen said that he’s also pushing to educate bikers on following traffic laws, and that it would take both a “culture change” and infrastructure improvements for Sacramentans to successfully share roads(more)

California bicyclists would be allowed to roll past stop signs under proposed law

By sfexaminer – excerpt

Cyclists in California would be allowed to pedal past stop signs — without stopping — under legislation proposed by two lawmakers who say it would make the roads safer.

The two-tiered approach to the rules of the road — one for cyclists and one for cars — is unlikely to ease growing tensions over sharing California’s roadways.

Bike advocates have won such victories in the Statehouse as requiring drivers to yield a three-foot radius of manoeuvring room to cyclists or face fines. Motorists meanwhile have expressed frustration that they see certain cyclists pick and choose which laws to follow.

Assemblymen Jay Obernolte (R-Hesperia) and Phil Ting (D-San Francisco) introduced their measure on Friday that would allow bicyclists to treat stop signs as merely yield signs — proceeding with caution if conditions are safe.

In effect, it would legalize the so-called California roll, although just for bicyclists…(more)

This law AB-1103 Bicycles: yielding has been through the legislature a number of times and has not passed yet. It will create more problems than it will solve and is not supported by all cyclists:

  1. Will this apply to 2-way stop signs or just 4-way stop signs? How will cyclists know the difference?
  2. Does anyone think cyclists will slow down more than they do now to look before “rolling” through?
  3. Legislators should include a clause that requires cyclists to purchase licenses and insurance to cover damages resulting from passage of this new law.
  4. This will be particularly difficult for drivers of large vehicles like buses and trucks, who can’t easily see bikes or stop on a dime when they do.
  5. How can SFMTA speed buses though intersections when they must worry about hitting cyclists rolling through stop signs?
  6. This will negatively impact the safety of other cyclists, pedestrians, tourists and young people who will find it even more confusing to walk safely on the streets than they do now.
  7. Wait for the lawsuits to come in.

Details on the AB-1103 – An act to amend Section 21200 of the Vehicle Code, relating to bicycles – Introduced by Assembly Members Obernolte and Ting (Coauthors: Assembly Members Bloom, Chávez, and Kiley)

Principal coauthor: Senator Wiener

Wiener proposes major fundraising legislation for transportation agencies statewide

By Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez : sfexaminer – excerpt

oon, the threshold for passing local transportation bonds in California could be far lower, unlocking funding for countless transit needs across the Golden State.
A new transbay tube. Caltrain electrification. Miles of new subways in cities from San Francisco to Los Angeles.

State Sen. Scott Wiener’s newly introduced state constitutional amendment would make funding projects like those far easier, by lowering the threshold to pass transportation bonds from a two-thirds voter majority to 55 percent.

That threshold is determined by the California constitution. The state constitutional amendment, which Wiener plans to introduce Monday, is still in its infancy. But if it succeeds, its effects could be far reaching.

“We have massive unfunded transportation needs on public transportation, roads and bridges,” Wiener told the San Francisco Examiner. “We need to empower local communities to fund these needs.”

Those needs include more than $59 billion in deferred transportation maintenance statewide, according to draft background language of the bill. Those needs are in the Bay Area, too…

“San Francisco’s unfunded transportation needs are billions and billions of dollars,” he said, “This money is absolutely needed.”…(more)

There is no SLUSH fund in the taxpayer’s pockets. Voters opposed the last tax hike because they can’t afford it. Government has lost the trust of the people. The SFMTA claimed they would improve traffic and transit and the opposite has happened.  Many don’t want the future being planned and more cannot afford to pay for it. The solution is a moratorium on hiring and major cuts to new projects until the current ones are completed and paid for.

Thousands hold hands to protest President Trump on Golden Gate Bridge

Bay City News : abc7news – excerpt

SAN FRANCISCO —
Thousands of people gathered to form a human chain on the sidewalk across the Golden Gate Bridge Friday morning.

Sausalito-based Bridge Together Golden Gate said the two-hour event beginning at 10 a.m., an hour after President Donald Trump was inaugurated, was not considered a protest, but an expression of unity.

Organizers said it would be the first human chain across the iconic span and beyond…

Parking lots at each end of the bridge will be significantly impacted by the protest…

“Seeing a lot of people lining up across Golden Gate- so far only traffic disruptions have been parking lot closures.” – Alexis Smith

Controlling the movement of humans is the first step to authoritarian rule. By removing our ability to move ourselves and subjecting us to using public transportation the government can limit our access to only areas they want us to go. Here is the proof.
There is an effort being put forth in Sacramento that would restrict the rights of persons under the age of 20 to drive a car by placing limits on their use of private vehicles. This is the first step to controlling private citizens ability to move about freely.

A Warning to People Who Bike: Self-Driving Ubers and Right Hook Turns

By Brian Wiedenmeier : sfbike – excerpt

Before the surprise launch of Uber’s autonomous vehicles on San Francisco streets this week, I rode in one. I can tell you firsthand: Those vehicles are not yet ready for our streets.

I was at one of the demonstrations covered in the SF Examiner, along with others who Uber hoped to impress with their new technology. None of us were told that just two days later, Uber would be releasing this technology on our streets on a large scale. I did tell Uber some things about the shortcomings of that technology, however.

In the ride I took through the streets of SoMa on Monday, the autonomous vehicle in “self-driving” mode as well as the one in front of it took an unsafe right-hook-style turn through a bike lane. Twice. This kind of turn is one featured in a 2013 blog post that is known to be one of the primary causes of collisions between cars and people who bike resulting in serious injury or fatality. It’s also an unsafe practice that we address in all of the safety curriculum we offer to professional drivers, including the videos we consulted on for Uber as recently as this fall.

I told staff from Uber’s policy and engineering teams about the safety hazards of their autonomous vehicle technology. They told me they would work on it. Then, two days later, they unleashed that technology on San Francisco’s streets. Your streets…(more)

RELATED:
What was Uber’s endgame in the first place?

Mayor Lee demands Uber obtain permit for self-driving vehicles on SF streets

By : sfexaminer – excerpt

Uber self-driving vehicles were still traveling on San Francisco streets Thursday without permission or permits from state regulators, a day after the ride-hail giant was threatened with legal action by the California DMV the same day it rolled out the self-driving vehicles.

Now Mayor Ed Lee has issued a statement strongly condemning Uber’s actions…

A source with close knowledge on the matter also told the Examiner that the mayor asked the San Francisco Police Department to investigate if The City had legal authority to impound Uber’s autonomous vehicles.

They found they could not legally do so…(more)

Video shows Uber’s self-driving cars running red lights

Just hours after Uber began operating self-driving cars in San Francisco, at least two incidents of the vehicles running red lights have lead to the suspension of the drivers in the cars and renewed pressure from the DMV.

https://youtu.be/_CdJ4oae8f4

You can see one of those incidents… Uber quickly put out a statement saying the lapses in road safety were due to human error and had suspended the two drivers in the vehicles at the time…

One self-driving car caught another one running 2 red lights in a row. It appears that the car did not stop until it reached stopped traffic. To me the light appeared to be yellow for four seconds before turning red. That is pretty short notice for drivers on a major street like Third Street to stop. The first light appears to be a pedestrian walk-way and not an intersection. That, along with the short yellow light timing, may have confused the car. Correct me if I am wrong. That is what I am observing.

“These incidents were due to human error. This is why we believe so much in making the roads safer by building self-driving Ubers,” the statement said. “The drivers involved have been suspended while we continue to investigate.”

That’s right. Blame the humans no the machines you are testing. How do they know who is to blame? California Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) doesn’t care. Hours after launching the program, they suspends driverless tests claiming Uber lacks a testing permit. Would this be under the watchful eye of the Caltrans CTCDC Commissioners? One could certainly find out and file a complaint.

In a separate instance, former San Francisco Business Times tech reporter Annie Gaus tweeted photos of an Uber running through an intersection at a red light, nearly colliding with a Lyft she was riding in.

“The Uber car sort of jutted out into the intersection,” Gaus told the Guardian.“It was close enough that we were both kind of like, ‘Whoa.’ It’s close enough that you kind of react and are sort of rattled.”… (more)