ENUF

ENUF has joined the non-partisan backlash against government overreach that is fighting privatization and commercialization of public streets and  properties all over the country.
We have caught the media’s attention as we abandon former party alliances to protect our civil liberties.
We are starting by pushing back at the excesses and lack of accountability of the SFMTA and supporting the No on A and B (No more Muni money for non-Muni projects) and Yes on L (Restore transportation balance) campaigns.

The history of the movement: Eastern Neighborhoods United Front (ENUF) was born out of concerns over plans to install thousands of parking meters in the North Eastern Neighborhoods. When signs popped up announcing that parking meters were going to to installed all over Potrero Hill, Dogpatch and the Mission District, hundreds of angry citizens showed up at City Hall to protest. Residents and merchants complained about meters in front of their homes and businesses with no notice, discussion or input on their part. Neighborhood groups filed an appeal and the next day the SFMTA withdraw their plans.

Citizens organized a public meeting which was widely attended by Supervisors, SFMTA staff the media, and hundreds of irate residents. Things did not go well for the SFMTA at that meeting and they backtracked from their original plans. At this point they had a foe that was ready to strike back.

Stop SFMTA: ENUF started a petition to Stop SFMTA which put more pressure on the city authorities and gave drivers and car owners a means to direct their anger and personal stories to the city authorities.

Uniting the neighborhoods: SFMTA attempted to divide and conquer by going after one street at a time, but ENUF united all neighborhood residents and merchants and together we were able to convince the Supervisors to limit the expansion of the parking meters in the city, using the one means possible of controlling the SFMTA. They amended the parking meter contract to limit the number of meters purchased. Recently SFMTA gave up enforcement of the Sunday parking meters as well.

Restore Transportation Balance: ENUF has been credited with starting the fight but now the anger has boiled over to the point that political forces have gathered to place the Restore Transportation Balance initiative on the November ballot. Passage of this ballot, which only requires a 51% vote to pass, will send a strong message to the SFMTA that their days are numbered if they don’t change course. http://www.restorebalance14.org/

contact@sfenuf.net with your suggestions and concerns
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Twitter:  https://twitter.com/#!/sf_enuf

Recent Posts

S.F. mayor pushing for special cameras to bust speeders

By Phil Matier and Matier & Ross : sfchronicle – excerpt

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee wants to bring in special cameras that would be used to ticket speeders.

Is he kidding? It is almost impossible to do the speed limit now. If he wants to bust speeders eh will have to clear up the traffic jams first.

Heads up, lead foots, Mayor Ed Lee is moving ahead with plans to bring speed cameras to San Francisco.

“It remains in our legislative agenda,” Muni spokesman Paul Rose said.

The cameras could be fixed or mounted on vans and first would be deployed near schools and seniors facilities. They would operate in much the same way as red-light cameras, using radar to track speed and then snapping a photo of those going over the limit.

“It’s a proven way to reduce accidents and fatalities,” said Rose, noting that Portland, Ore., New York, Seattle, Chicago and the District of Columbia are already using the gadgets.

As with red-light cameras, the new speed-trackers would capture the vehicle’s license plate along with the time, date and location. The vehicle owner then would be issued a $100 fine by Muni. The police would not be involved.

“Unlike a regular speeding ticket, it would not be a moving violation and would not go on the person’s driving record,” Rose said. The tickets would not be subject to the various state surcharges that can turn a $100 moving violation into a $400 fine.

In short, the speed-camera ticket would be more like a parking citation. And, as with a parking ticket, the car owner would be responsible for the fine — no matter who was driving.

Money from the tickets would go into road safety initiatives.

Rose said none of the city’s legislative representatives has offered to author the change in state law that is needed to make the cameras a reality, but that the mayor would keep pushing no matter what(more)

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