ENUF

San Francisco citizen finally won a big victory. After years of petitions, complaints, letters and public comments about the SFMTA, the Board of Supervisors unanimously passed Ordinance: 180089 and are threatening to place a Charter Amendment on the ballot if the SFMTA does not start listening to the public. The ordinance set up a system for appeals of SFMTA Board decisions. People need to be organized and prepared to use the process.

JOIN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD GROUP TO TAKE BACK OUR STREETS

Filing an appeal and winning the battle will depend on an organized neighborhood effort that will require an educated public willing to act. The neighborhood groups can fulfill that need, but they need your help and support to do that.

East Mission Improvement Association (EMIA) is one of the Neighborhood groups in the Mission District that is focused on traffic and parking issues. Contact us for information and assistance with parking and traffic concerns in the Mission.

We will list proposed projects in the Mission District that residents and businesses oppose here: The-Mission

The history of the movement:

Eastern Neighborhoods United Front (ENUF) was born out of concerns over plans to install thousands of parking meters in the North Eastern Neighborhoods. When signs popped up announcing that parking meters were going to to installed all over Potrero Hill, Dogpatch and the Mission District, hundreds of angry citizens showed up at City Hall to protest. Residents and merchants complained about meters in front of their homes and businesses with no notice, discussion or input on their part. Neighborhood groups filed an appeal and the next day the SFMTA withdraw their plans.

Citizens organized a public meeting which was widely attended by Supervisors, SFMTA staff the media, and hundreds of irate residents. Things did not go well for the SFMTA at that meeting and they backtracked from their original plans. At this point they had a foe that was ready to strike back.

Stop SFMTA: ENUF started a petition to Stop SFMTA which put more pressure on the city authorities and gave drivers and car owners a means to direct their anger and personal stories to the city authorities.

Uniting the neighborhoods: SFMTA attempted to divide and conquer by going after one street at a time, but ENUF united all neighborhood residents and merchants and together we were able to convince the Supervisors to limit the expansion of the parking meters in the city, using the one means possible of controlling the SFMTA. They amended the parking meter contract to limit the number of meters purchased. Recently SFMTA gave up enforcement of the Sunday parking meters as well.

ENUF has been credited with starting the fight but now the anger has boiled over to the point that neighborhood groups all over the city are involved.

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Recent Posts

Transit planners want to make your life worse

By Joel Kotkin : dailyreeze – excerpt

In our system of government, the public sector is, well, supposed to serve the public. But increasingly the bureaucracies at the state and local level increasingly seek to tell the public how to live, even if the result is to make life worse.

This became glaringly obvious recently, when the CEO of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Phil Washington, reeling from data showing a steady drop of transit riders, decided that the only solution was to make driving worse.

“It’s too easy to drive in this city,” said Washington. “We want to reach the riders that left and get to the new ones as well. And part of that has to do with actually making driving harder.”

Now let’s consider what that means. L.A. County is hardly a paradise now for commuters — 84 percent of whom drive to work — while the Orange County and Riverside-San Bernardino areas, where transit dependence is even less marked, are no great shakes, either. All suffer among the longest average commutes of anywhere in the nation…(more)

Kotin’s article ties in rather well with my theory that the authorities are beginning their heads agains the wall of public opposition in eager anticipation of breaking it down, instead of accepting defeat, and changing direction. We need new priorities and politics to solve the problems of today. We don’t need more worn out tired and failed torments and torturous manipulations from government bureaucrats. When the bus does not arrive it is rather hard to take it. The solution is to put more buses in service, not to remove parking spaces and raise the ticket price for public transit systems. the solution is not to make deals with corporations intent on controlling the streets. More money for Muni is not working when the money is misspent. It will be difficult for the net round of bonds to pass when the pro transit people are not wholly supportive of Proposition D.

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