ENUF

ENUF joined the non-partisan backlash against government overreach that is fighting privatization and commercialization of public streets and  properties all over the country. We are abandoning former party alliances to protect our civil liberties. We are working to stop the development that is bringing the massive traffic mess to our streets. We are also backing new leadership at City Hall. A new site: enufsf.com  that focuses on the NE parking plans was just launched.

The history of the movement: Eastern Neighborhoods United Front (ENUF) was born out of concerns over plans to install thousands of parking meters in the North Eastern Neighborhoods. When signs popped up announcing that parking meters were going to to installed all over Potrero Hill, Dogpatch and the Mission District, hundreds of angry citizens showed up at City Hall to protest. Residents and merchants complained about meters in front of their homes and businesses with no notice, discussion or input on their part. Neighborhood groups filed an appeal and the next day the SFMTA withdraw their plans.

Citizens organized a public meeting which was widely attended by Supervisors, SFMTA staff the media, and hundreds of irate residents. Things did not go well for the SFMTA at that meeting and they backtracked from their original plans. At this point they had a foe that was ready to strike back.

Stop SFMTA: ENUF started a petition to Stop SFMTA which put more pressure on the city authorities and gave drivers and car owners a means to direct their anger and personal stories to the city authorities.

Uniting the neighborhoods: SFMTA attempted to divide and conquer by going after one street at a time, but ENUF united all neighborhood residents and merchants and together we were able to convince the Supervisors to limit the expansion of the parking meters in the city, using the one means possible of controlling the SFMTA. They amended the parking meter contract to limit the number of meters purchased. Recently SFMTA gave up enforcement of the Sunday parking meters as well.

Restore Transportation Balance: ENUF has been credited with starting the fight but now the anger has boiled over to the point that political forces have gathered to place the Restore Transportation Balance initiative on the November ballot. Passage of this ballot, which only requires a 51% vote to pass, will send a strong message to the SFMTA that their days are numbered if they don’t change course. http://www.restorebalance14.org/

contact@sfenuf.net with your suggestions and concerns
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Twitter:  https://twitter.com/#!/sf_enuf

Recent Posts

Why Is Transit Ridership Falling?

Transit ridership took a turn for the worse in 2016. In all but a handful of cities, fewer people rode trains and buses, even in some places, like Los Angeles, that have invested significantly in expanding capacity.

It’s not just a one-year blip, either. In many American cities, the drop in transit ridership is an established trend. The big question is why.

Transit consultant Jarrett Walker at Human Transit wants more than vague speculation about the effect of low gas prices and ride-hailing services. He’s looking for more specific research about causes and effects — and soon:

Bottom line: We need research! Not the sort of formally peer reviewed research that will take a year to publish, but faster work by real transportation scholars that can report preliminary results in time to guide action. I am not a transportation researcher, but there are plenty of them out there, and this is our moment of need.

Here are my research questions:

  • Which global causes seem to matter?  Straight regression analysis, once you get data you believe.  Probably the study will need to start with a small dataset of transit agencies, so that there’s time to talk with each agency and understand their unique data issues.
  • What’s happening to the quantity of transit?  If ridership is falling because service is falling, this isn’t a surprise.  If ridership is falling because service is getting slower — which means lower frequency and speed at the same cost — well, that wouldn’t be surprising either.
  • How does the decline correlate to types of service?  Is this fall happening in dense areas or just in car-based suburbs? Is it happening on routes that are designed for high ridership, or only on those that are designed for coverage purposes (services retained because three sympathetic people need them rather than because the bus will be full).   Is it correlated to frequency or span changes? Heads up, local geeks! A lot could be done looking at data for your own transit agency — route by route and even (where available) stop by stop, to analyze where in your metro the fall is really occurring… (more)

I appreciate the thought that went into this article.  In my experience, people decide how to live their lives based on their personal needs, not based on datasets and studies. My questions would be of a more personal nature and I would put them to the public.

  • Why do you take public transit when you take it?
  • Why do you chose to take another transit option when you don’t?
  • Do your priorities align with SFMTA and City Hall priorities?
  • What Muni changes do you support?
  • What Muni changes do you oppose?
  • Do you prefer speed or comfort?
  • Would you rather stand on public transit if you get there faster?
  • Would you rather sit if it takes longer to get there?
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