Eastern Neighborhoods

http://enufsf.com/ deals with a new Pilot plans the SFMTA has for Dogpatch.
Parking Pilot Proposed in Dogpatch by : potreroview

The biggest problem we face is the elimination of traffic lanes and parking spots on our major streets. The Potrero Avenue plan, along with the expansion of General Hospital is a travesty in more ways than one. Let the Supervisors know how you feel about the way SFMTA is managing traffic and parking:
https://metermadness.wordpress.com/district-supervisors

The RPP request to extend Zone W was filed. Go here to download these and other documents: http://sfenuf.net/Docs.html
Residential Parking Permit Petitions: RPP forms
Business Parking Permit Forms: RPP Biz forms

NEMBA has is developing another plan for PDRs and businesses here:
http://nembasf.org/events/

Here are some photos of the streets in the Eastern Neighborhoods that the SFMTA claims need calming and more parking controls. In truth, the streets are filling up during the day because of SFMTA’s efforts to remove parking spaces. People park here because the BART station is nearby, and because they have been squeezed out of their neighborhoods. Sound familiar? At night and on weekends there is more than ample parking.  Click on an image to launch slide show.

Most residents agree our neighborhoods need more parking, not less. We need parking right off the freeways exits so we can take public transit and not waste all day getting to the final destination. Some Supervisors and Candidates agree.

This website is provided by the City and County of San Francisco to assist San Franciscans to make street improvements in their neighborhoods, shopping districts, and workplaces. The site provides information on street improvement project types, the City’s permitting process, maintenance responsibilities, and applicable codes and guidelines. http://www.sfbetterstreets.org/

Recent Posts

Exclusive: Key pollution control program is disabled in SF Muni’s newest, costliest, ‘greenest’ hybrid buses

By Joe Eskenizi : missionlocal – excerpt

Broken down electric bus outside of bus barn on 16th at Folsom stopped traffic including other Munis for hours – photo by zrants

In 1987, the Board of Supervisors passed legislation urging Muni “to take certain steps to minimize air pollutant emissions,” and get workers trained “in the latest emissions reduction techniques.”

Fine words. But, in 1996, representatives from the San Francisco budget analyst’s office staked out bus yards in the wee hours, and observed Muni employees idling diesel coaches for up to four-and-a-half hours; “Pollution Menace at Muni, Audit Finds,” screamed the eventual front-page headline in the San Francisco Examiner.  That story revealed the city analysts’ grim tabulation of Muni’s dirty habit: Those idling buses needlessly discharged the equivalent amount of pollutants as 56,000 cars—every single day.

In 2013, your humble narrator staggered up to a Muni yard at 4 a.m. and documented that it was all still happening. The first rays of sunlight revealed an oily haze enveloping the yard—the byproduct of scores of buses idling for hours on end.

Idling a bus for more than five or 10 minutes, by the way, is not only wasteful and unnecessary, but is also a violation of state law

Idling buses for hours—damaging their engines, wasting money and fuel, and polluting the environment—has been a problem at Muni for decades. And, a few months ago, the phone calls started coming in: It’s still happening…

Muni has long idled its buses indefinitely, and, barring decisive action, will continue to do so indefinitely. It does so despite the explicit instructions of the manufacturer of its diesel engines, and against the recommendation of every vehicle manufacturer on God’s green earth. It does so in the face of economic, mechanical, and environmental rationales and in violation of common sense and common decency.

That may yet change. But, for now, it remains to be seen what, if anything, will inspire Muni to throw idling under the bus… (more)

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