Another pedestrian breaks leg on yellow curbside bumps

By Gary Richards, Roadshow : mercurynews – excerpt

This is a response to your article about people slipping on those yellow buttons at crosswalks. On Feb. 26 at around 7 a.m. I was heading to work at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation when I slipped on the yellow sidewalk bumps and fractured both my tibia and fibula…

This is the second such incident reported to Roadshow where a person slipped like this and broke their leg. Keith says he is considering filing a claim against Palo Alto.

These are “truncated domes,” which are typically located at the bottom of curb ramps and have been required by federal law since 1991 to give warning to the visually impaired that they are leaving the sidewalk and entering the street. Their design is stipulated to include traction-enhancing features on the top of each dome to minimize slipping… (more)

The design is obviously flawed because hundreds of people fall on them. Even some bikes go down. Another dumb idea that got sold to the government that needs to go.

Safety Course Not Required For Uber, Lyft, Others

hoodline – excerpt

In the wake of an Uber driver arrested after allegedly hitting and injuring a cyclist in Fisherman’s Wharf on Sunday, more questions are being raised about driver safety requirements.

Specifically, taxis are regulated by SFMTA and are required to take 28 hours of classes through one of four approved private driving schools, and another day of training through the SFMTA. An hour of the SFMTA training includes instruction on sharing the road with bicyclists and pedestrians, is taught by a member of the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition. At least two hours of testing is required. And as part of the city’s Vision Zero plan, which aims to eliminate traffic deaths by 2024, SFMTA is instituting a large vehicle urban driving safety program for all large vehicle drivers who work for the city.

All told, as Central City Extra covered in their latest issue (PDF), there are 71 pages of dense regulations for cab drivers to follow.

Not so for drivers working for Uber, Lyft, Sidecar or limo companies, which are not regulated by the SFMTA – they only have 28 simple regulations to follow.

And the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition, among others, is concerned about this gap in safety mandates. “We need to ensure everyone knows how to share the road safely,” said Tyler Frisbee, policy director at the organization. Many of the drivers, she said, aren’t used to driving in a city as busy as San Francisco.

“Whether cab, Uber, Lyft—they’re pulling over to the side frequently, they’re loading and unloading, they’re driving through crowded areas” such as Market Street, SoMa and the FiDi, Frisbee said. “The reason SFMTA hires us is they want to protect peoples’ lives,” she added. “There’s no similar training for Uber. Their drivers take a couple of very short safety classes that are taught online.”… (More)

Vision Zero advocates push forward as pedestrian deaths decline in 2014

By sfexaminer – excerpt

Pedestrian fatalities in San Francisco in 2014 were down slightly from the previous year, but still higher than the past several years, a figure that traffic-safety officials and advocates hope to drive down with Vision Zero projects planned throughout 2015.

According to the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, 18 pedestrian fatalities and three bicyclist deaths involving motor vehicles occurred in 2014. In 2013, there were 21 pedestrian fatalities — with seven in December and three on New Year’s Eve alone, including the death of 6-year-old Sofia Liu who was hit by an Uber driver — and four bicyclist fatalities…

Prop. A allows The City to borrow up to $500 million by issuing general-obligation bonds for improving its transit infrastructure and aging roads, while Prop. B amended the city charter to allocate a greater amount of the general fund toward the transit agency each year based on population growth.

The Vision Zero coalition’s goal for this year, Schneider said, is to complete 18 miles of street-safety improvement projects on high-injury corridors, which account for 6 percent of The City’s streets and 60 percent of severe and fatal injuries on average… (more)

SF is receiving vehicle collision data faster with new database

by : sfexaminer – excerpt

A collision occurs. What next?
In San Francisco, a police officer documents the details in a collision report and the hard copy is sent to the California Highway Patrol, which compiles all accident data for the year and shares it with the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency and Department of Public Health. The entire process takes a year and a half to two years…
Meanwhile, agencies outside of law enforcement that need the data to push various transportation initiatives would be left waiting at least a year until the CHP released its Statewide Integrated Traffic Records System database.
“We’ll have this information at our fingertips almost immediately and it allows us to better plan and design the work we do to make our streets as safe as possible,” said SFMTA spokesman Paul Rose.
The SFMTA already has Crossroads data — designed to compile information including collision types, degree of injury and historical highs — from January through October of this year… (more)

More none-Muni projects and studies that the SFMTA is spending time on trying to prove that cars are bad instead of just putting ALL the money into making Muni run better.