Mission advocates resist bikeshare push, point to existing community programs

By Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez : sfexaminer – excerpt

Fordbikes

A new batch of Ford bikes sprang up on Bryant and 17th Street without warning. It is no secret that the plan is to remove public parking for private vehicles by leasing the streets to corporations. The pubic is not reacting favorably to that plan. photo by zrants

The backlash was fierce and unexpected.

On the surface, Ford GoBike is seemingly everything the staunchly liberal Mission District would value: an affordable bikeshare program targeted at reducing carbon emissions and traffic congestion by offering cheap, rentable bikes.

After the company’s most recent expansion, however, groups representing Latino neighbors in the Mission quickly pushed back, citing gentrification fears.

“The way we shop, the way we travel, it’s a very different culture,” Erick Arguello, co-chair of the Calle 24 Historical District on 24th Street in the Mission, previously told the San Francisco Examiner. “We did say, ‘No, we don’t want bikeshare on 24th Street in the Latino Cultural District.’”… (more)

Public streets are for the public. Taking public property from pubic use may not be tolerated for long. The supervisors should consider who is benefiting from this scheme and who they are pushing to the curb.

Mission District Ford GoBike kiosks vandalized, again

At least two Ford GoBike kiosks at the edge of the Mission District were spotted vandalized Friday morning.

A bikeshare kiosk and bikes at Folsom and 15th streets were splashed with blue paint, and another kiosk at Folsom and 17th streets was splashed with pink paint…(more)

Bikeshare company may drop thousands of bikes on SF streets without permits

By Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez : sfexaminer – excerpt

“Disruption” is tech term with which San Francisco is all too familiar.
Now, China-based bikeshare company Bluegogo may follow in the footsteps of Uber, Airbnb and other tech companies by launching in San Francisco without permission or permits, following the “disruption” template established by so many others.

If Bluegogo, which recently has signaled its apparent upcoming expansion into San Francisco, repeat its business model seen in other cities worldwide, the company may place tens of thousands of bicycles on San Francisco streets that will be available for rent via an app –– seemingly without first asking permission to use city sidewalk.

Supervisor Aaron Peskin, who has longed battled with “disruptive” companies like Airbnb, told the San Francisco Examiner it was problematic Bluegogo has not contacted city officials.

“This is the age old tech arrogance,” Peskin said, which is a “‘do what they want and answer their questions later’ business model that has gotten everybody from Airbnb to Uber in trouble.”

Peskin said he directed the City Attorney’s Office to look into remedy to address Bluegogo’s potential scofflaw actions. The Mayor’s Office was unaware of Bluegogo’s expansion into San Francisco.

John Cote, spokesperson for the City Attorney’s Office said, “We’re aware of Bluegogo’s interest in San Francisco. We’re working with our clients to evaluate the situation. Any company that comes to the city has to follow the law, and we have tools at our disposal to ensure that happens.”… (more)