Say Goodbye to Van Ness Avenue, Broadway and Haight Street

What do drivers, Muni riders, Muni operators, taxi drivers, elderly and disabled people, parents, emergency personnel and many families long time residents of San Francisco have in common? A growing distrust for the SFMTA.

Thanks to everyone who voted No on A and B and Yes on L. The voters who were duped into trusting the SFMTA can now enjoy their next bold move. Tomorrow they plan to approve removal of traffic lanes and parking on Van Ness, Broadway, and Haight Street. For details of the plans you can try to read this week’s SFMTA agenda. The meeting is tomorrow, so you have one day to prepare your protest.

RELATED:
Van Ness Avenue next on list for traffic tie-ups in S.F.

 

District 3 Street re-designs

Supervisor David Chiu July/August 2014 Newsletter – excerpt

Broadway Street Design Advances
For years, Broadway, particularly from the tunnel to Columbus Avenue, has had significant safety and quality-of-life issues as motorists speed from the west to the east side of our district, through the heart of one of the densest residential neighborhoods on the West Coast.  We have seen too many traffic-related collisions in a mixed-used corridor where residents of all ages live, play, go to school and work.

As reported by the SF Examiner, we have made good progress at planning a Broadway Chinatown Design project to transform Broadway into a more vibrant and multi-modal street for all users. The two-year interagency effort has completed its planning phase and the Department of Public Works is now preparing construction documents for the new Broadway. The Final Report on the street design and design website contains more details on the context, history, and planning process thus far. You can also view and provide feedback through August 4 on new public artwork proposals that are part of this exciting project.

Lower Polk Community Benefit District Vote Coming Up
After three years of hard work and extensive outreach led by a steering committee of local residents and businesses, this month, the Board will vote on establishing a Community Benefit District for the Lower Polk neighborhood. Lower Polk is a diverse, wonderful neighborhood that faces a number of challenges. Public safety, vacant storefronts, homelessness, and lack of green space are common concerns. The new CBD would use its $800,000 annual budget and any additional funding to provide services above and beyond the City’s current level. Lower Polk will see additional capital improvements, sidewalk cleaning, graffiti removal, tree maintenance, and safety and social service outreach ambassadors, among many others.

It’s impossible to write about the potential Lower Polk CBD without remembering and celebrating the contributions of Shell Thomas, who for years spearheaded the efforts to make it a reality. He also championed other important projects in North Beach, Chinatown, Broadway and Polk Street with dedication and humor. Shell passed away unexpectedly a few weeks ago, and will be dearly missed by many in our northeast neighborhoods… taken from Supervisors Chui’s newsletter July

Stay tuned for upates on neighborhood meetings to voice your opinions on these these designs.