Fisherman’s Wharf statue accident points up delays in ambulance response time

By Noelle Walker: ktvu – excerpt

… Police responded in a minute and a half, firefighters followed a minute after that and assessed the boy’s medical needs.

“In this case there were not any advanced life support measures that were performed.” said SFFD Medical Director Clement Yeh. “It was recognized early on that this boy needed to get to the hospital.”

But of the 16 SFFD ambulances on duty that day in addition to private ambulances, only one was available. At the time of the call, the vehicle was at Stanyan and Oak, 4.5 miles away from Fisherman’s Wharf.

It took the ambulance 13 minutes to arrive, three minutes longer than the fire department’s response time goal.

“We are always trying to improve our care, but the nature of this case was really tragic.” said Yeh.

The question that remains: would three minutes have made a difference? Shelton died at the hospital four hours after the accident.

“Whether or not it would have made a difference, I think based on that information in this particular case, it probably would not have.” said Talmadge.

While the fire department’s goal response time is ten minutes, the average response time is 12 minutes… (more)

We agree with the Fire Chief that emergency responders should have priority in street design decisions. Wider free-flowing streets should be preserved. We oppose SB 1193 that would legitimize SFMTA’s street diet pilot projects. SF should not deviate from the current state design standards.

San Francisco and its cycletracks lead the way toward safer biking statewide

Ting is working on the issue with the California Bicycle Coalition, whose executive director Dave Snyder is a longtime San Francisco bike activist. Snyder says Caltrans doesn’t allow bike lanes that include physical barriers against traffic, even though they are widely used in other countries and states and considered to be safest design for cyclists.

San Francisco has been blazing the trail toward safer cycling with innovative designs such as cycletracks, or bike lanes that are physically separated from cars, which have been installed on Market Street and JFK Drive. But cycletracks aren’t legal under state law, something that a San Francisco lawmaker and activist are trying to solve so that other California cities can more easily build them.

“Right now, many cities are not putting in cycletracks for fear they don’t conform to the Caltrans manual,” says Assemblymember Phil Ting, whose Assembly Bill 1193 — which would legalize and set design standards for cycletracks — cleared the Assembly yesterday [Wed/29] and is now awaiting action by the Senate.

Ting is working on the issue with the California Bicycle Coalition, whose executive director Dave Snyder is a longtime San Francisco bike activist. Snyder says Caltrans doesn’t allow bike lanes that include physical barriers against traffic, even though they are widely used in other countries and states and considered to be safest design for cyclists.

San Francisco is technically breaking the law because they have the best traffic engineers in the state and a good City Attorney’s Office and they know they can defend it in court if they have to,” Snyder said. “Most places in the state won’t do that.”… (more)

So now we know. They admit some of the bike lanes are illegal. If you object to this law (Assembly Bill 1193) to legalize the illegal bike lanes in San Francisco, let Phil Ting and the state representatives know about it now: Contacts here. And let your city officials know: Contacts here

Sign petitions, write letters. This is an election year. DO YOU WANT TO GIVE MORE MONEY TO THE FOLKS WHO ARE BREAKING THE LAW NOW? Do they represent your interests?

RELATED:
Gov’s Report to Caltrans: Get Out of the Way of Protected Bike Lanes
Caltrans needs to stop focusing so much on moving cars and let cities build safer street designs with protected bike lanes, says a new report commissioned by Governor Jerry Brown and CA Transportation Secretary Brian Kelly…
they must take a legal risk since Caltrans hasn’t approved such designs, and design exceptions require “a painful and time-consuming process,” says the report, produced by the State Smart Transportation Initiative…