Coming to 13th Street: SF’s First Downtown Parking-Protected Bike Lane

Aaron Bialick : sf.streetsblog – excerpt

13th Street is set to get a westbound parking-protected bike lane between Bryant and Folsom Streets, among other improvements this spring. Image: SFMTA

San Francisco may get its first downtown parking-protected bike lane on 13th Street this spring. The SFMTA will be taking comments on the plans at a hearing tomorrow morning.

The bike lane would be installed only in the westbound direction of 13th underneath the Central Freeway, from Bryant to Folsom Streets. It would complement the existing eastbound bike lane on 14th Street, providing a safer route on a “key east-west corridor for people biking to destinations like the Caltrain Station, the Mission District, AT&T Ballpark, and the South Beach area in general,” said SFMTA Livable Streets spokesperson Ben Jose… (more)

We saw no notice about this plan. Discovered it when we went to protest the Polk Streetscape Project. Why do they want cyclists near freeway on and off-ramps? This is a dangerous street for cars. There is no reason to have bikes on this street when there are better options nearby.

On further examination, we see that these lanes are the awful design that they have in Golden Gate Park that people detest. Let’s confuse everyone, especially those dreaded out-of town visitor who have the nerve to try to drive in our city by imposing “unique” new confusing bike lanes along-side the freeway access roads. That will be a welcoming experience.

17th Street Bike Lane Update

From: “Provence, Dan” <Dan.Provence@sfmta.com>
Date:
June 15, 2012 12:13:54 PM MDT
Subject:
17th Street Bike Lane Update

Hello,

As you may have noticed, the paving project on 17th Street is nearly complete so this is a good time to update you on the status of the approved changes that we will be making.  Within the next week or two, we will be installing bicycle lanes on 17th Street between Potrero Avenue and Treat Street to connect the existing bike lanes east and west of this stretch.  We will also be installing Tow Away No Parking Anytime signs on much of this stretch of 17th Street.  The “No Parking” regulations are less strict than the “No Stopping” regulations originally proposed and will allow for active loading from the bike lanes in order to accommodate businesses along 17th Street.  More signs will be added on some of the side streets to increase parking supply and to manage the length of time that vehicles are parked on the side streets.

The following changes were approved at the public hearing that we had in September of 2011 and will be implemented as part of the bike lane project.

ESTABLISH — PERPENDICULAR PARKING

  •   Alabama Street, east side, from 17th Street to 105 feet southerly
  •   Florida Street, west side, from Division to 475 feet southerly
  •   Florida Street, east side, from 17th Street to 105 feet northerly
  •   Florida Street, west side, from Mariposa Street to 130 feet northerly
  •   Hampshire Street, east side, from Mariposa Street to 18th Street
  •   San Bruno Avenue, west side, from 16th Street to 17th Street
  •   San Bruno Avenue, east side, from 17th Street to 180 feet southerly

ESTABLISH — 12 HOUR PARKING TIME LIMIT, EVERYDAY

  •   Bryant Street, east side, from 17th Street to Mariposa Street
  •   York Street, west side, from Mariposa Street to 18th Street
  •   Hampshire Street, west side, from 17th Street to Mariposa Street

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Thanks,

Dan Provence,  Livable Streets Subdivision | SFMTA | Municipal Transportation Agency | Sustainable Streets Division

1 South Van Ness Ave, 7th floor
San Francisco, CA 94103
Phone: 415.701.4448
Fax: 415.701.4343

email: Dan.Provence@sfmta.com 
www.sfmta.com/livablestreets

Andy Thornley Departs SFBC to Work at SFPark

by Aaron Bialick : sf.streetsblog.org – excerpt

In a “bittersweet farewell,” the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition announced today that its policy director, Andy Thornley, has been picked for an internship at the SFMTA’s SFPark program. His transition to city government is a positive sign for the livable streets movement in San Francisco…

If there was ever any doubt about the connection between the two organizations, there is none now.