Big changes coming to the busy lanes of S.F.’s Mission Street

By  Michael Cabanatuan : sfgate – excerpt

Change is no stranger to the Mission District, and this time it’s the main drag — Mission Street — and the heavily ridden Muni lines that are set for transformation.

The bustling thoroughfare is gaining some red transit-only lanes, while losing a lane of traffic, in a bid to clear out many cars — especially double-parkers — and speed up buses that is reminiscent of transit-first efforts in other parts of the city, including Market Street downtown.

The shifts, which cover a 2½-mile stretch of Mission, begin Saturday, when Muni pares back what it considers an inefficient series of bus stops by eliminating 13 stops serving three bus lines — the 14-Mission, 14R-Mission Rapid and 49-Van Ness/Mission — and adding one.

Public-works crews will also break out paint and brushes and start adding red transit-only lanes between 11th and Randall streets… (more)

more millions of dollars poured into projects that bus riders and residents do not support and object to for vigorously. As one citizen pointed out, by eliminating bust stops the SFMTA is putting people at greater risk by forcing people to walk longer distances in dangerous neighborhoods. The are also making it more difficult for people who have health or physical problems. Not everyone is needs more exercise. Some people can barely get where they need to go as it is.

SFMTA Pilot Offers Slight Change in Tech Shuttle Map

By misisonlocal – excerpt

When the SFMTA’s new pilot program to regulate tech shuttles starts in August, neighbors may not notice huge changes. Despite coming in the wake of significant neighborhood complaints about the shuttles’ omnipresence, the pilot program will shift the location of stops but not decrease the actual number of stops operating in the Mission… (more)

SFMTA chief hopes to calm the parking meter furor at supervisorial hearing

Steven T. Jones : sfweekly – excerpt

San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency director Ed Reiskin faces a tough challenge tomorrow (Thu/2) at the Board of Supervisors Neighborhood Services and Safety hearing that Sup. Mark Farrell has called on expanding parking meters into new neighborhoods, where Reiskin is expected to face a hornet’s nest of SFMTA critics stirred up by the loss of free street parking and perceptions that the agency is mismanaging public spaces and transit.
Reiskin needs to quell some of the anger that is erupting in the northeast Mission District, Potrero Hill, and other areas slated for new meters enough to prevent increased supervisorial intervention into his independent agency and ensure a transit improvement bond measure planned for next year has a chance of passing – which the agency desperately needs to make improvements to Muni… (more)

Diverted funds: If SFMTA needs money to fix the Muni why did they divert 510 million dollars in public transit fees from Muni to the street calming project to reduce the traffic lanes where Dolores meets Market Street?

This is an in-kind trade that doesn’t smell right. How can they possibly spend over half a billion dollars widening a sidewalk?  Is this real money and where is it going?

The Sunday parking meters are expected to bring in a measly 1.7 million dollars a year. Why bother collecting 1.7 million dollars if you are going to give away 510 million? The voters are not that dumb. Ed and Primus are wasting their time.

Proposal to raze I-280 linked to train and real estate deals

By Steven T. Jones : SFBG.com – excerpt

It’s a bold idea, discussed for years behind closed doors and recently announced in a strangely understated and pro-growth way: Tear down the last mile of Interstate 280 and replace it with an wide boulevard – reminiscent of the removal of the Central and Embarcadero freeways – in order to facilitate the extension of electrified Caltrain and high-speed rail tracks into the Transbay Terminal…

Proposal to raze I-280 linked to train and real estate deals

01.23.13 – 4:03 pm | Steven T. Jones |

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State plans to facilitate more trains by further isolating Mission Bay led to the proposal to tear down I-280 at 16th Street.

 

It’s a bold idea, discussed for years behind closed doors and recently announced in a strangely understated and pro-growth way: Tear down the last mile of Interstate 280 and replace it with an wide boulevard – reminiscent of the removal of the Central and Embarcadero freeways – in order to facilitate the extension of electrified Caltrain and high-speed rail tracks into the Transbay Terminal.
For almost three years, city planners have been discussing the idea and drawing up closely guarded plans to tear down the freeway, discussions sparked by the state’s Environmental Impact Reports on electrifying the Caltrain tracks and bringing high-speed trains into town. With an increasing number of trains traveling those tracks, access to the rapidly growing Mission Bay area from the west on 16th Street would turn into a traffic nightmare, either with long waits for an at-grade train crossing or the creation of ugly and uninviting underpasses for cars and bikes….
So a staff-level proposal to solve a transportation challenge with an elegant multi-modal solution that follows in the city’s tradition of tearing down freeways has morphed into a real estate deal. Quentin Kopp, the father of high-speed rail in California, has already derided the Transbay Terminal project (which is funded by the sale of state land surrounding the site to office tower developers) as little more than a real estate deal, and now the city is apparently seeking to extend that deal further into Mission Bay…. (more)

 

Disgruntled residents band together to protest meters in eastern neighborhoods

By Will Reisman : SFExaminer – excerpt

Disgruntled residents in The City’s eastern neighborhoods have banded together to protest the installation of parking meters in their communities.

The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency plans to add about 5,000 parking meters in the Mission Bay, Potrero Hill, Mission District and SoMa District neighborhoods.

Residents came out in force against the decision during a January hearing, forcing the SFMTA to later delay the project. Now, the locals have created a group, called the Eastern Neighborhoods United Front (ENUF), to squelch the agency’s plans for good.

ENUF has started an online presence (sfenuf.org) to highlight their concerns with the plan, and the group is circulating a census survey around the neighborhood to gather further feedback of community concerns, said Tony Kelly, a Potrero Hill activist who is leading the

Read more at the San Francisco Examiner