SF General Hospital seeks solutions to parking headache

By sfexaminer – excerpt

San Francisco General Hospital has a parking problem, and without intervention it may only get worse.

That was the message at a Health Commission meeting Tuesday, where officials said new construction projects at San Francisco General may need as many as 500 new parking spaces by 2020, or a resulting car crisis may drive patients to competing hospitals.

In response, the Health Commission voted unanimously to approve a resolution urging the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency to expand a nearby parking garage, in the first of many goals meant to address the need for more parking.

“Even with the most aggressive programs, we project will have deficits in parking,” Kathy Jung, director of facilities and capital planning at the Department of Public Health, told the Health Commission….

…that new hospital, as well as other new buildings on site, will soon eliminate some existing parking at San Francisco General.

And those same new buildings will simultaneously drive demand for more transit. All told, the Department of Public Health estimates the hospital will need more than 900 parking spaces after 2020…

The DPH has partnered with the SFMTA to work on the parking deficiency problem the last two years. The issue will now go before the SFMTA’s Policy and Governance Committee to brainstorm additional solutions. Expanding the parking garage and other new ideas will go before the full SFMTA board on March 17.

“The hope ultimately is that Muni and other forms of transportation would be so good that we wouldn’t need all that parking,” Tom Nolan, president of the SFMTA board, told The Examiner, referring to the projected 900-space deficit.

Muni will better serve General Hospital one day, he said, “but probably not that quickly, and not that much.”… (more)

Tom Nolan admits that no parking or Muni service will be added quickly. Perhaps someone at SFMTA should talk to the health industry they claim to be supporting. Patients leaving a medical facility who are medicated must arrange for a ride home with a friend. How are they going to release patients to the care of a friend without parking?

Maybe they should put the bike lanes on the 20 wide sidewalks instead of taking over a street lane.

Bay Area Traffic Congestion Is Worse Than Anywhere in U.S. Except L.A.

San Francisco has the second-worst congestion in the United States, according to a new report. On average, a driver here with a 30-minute commute spent 83 hours stuck in traffic in 2013. Only Los Angeles is more arterially clogged.

Tom Tom, a firm based in Amsterdam that sells GPS-based navigation and mapping products, released its fourth annual traffic index on Wednesday. The survey looked at congestion levels on highways, freeways, local roads and city streets.

The index compared travel times during non-congested, or free flow, times with travel times in peak hours. For San Francisco, the congestion level of 32 percent means that, on average, a driver in San Francisco experienced 32 percent extra travel time on an average trip compared with non-congested situations at the quietest times of day. The delay per hour for a driver in a peak period was 34 minutes.

The numbers translate into lots of wasted time, motorist bile, air pollution and probably higher blood pressure.

“As the economy gets better, as more people are working, as more people have more discretionary spending, they drive a lot more,” said Michael Cabanatuan, who covers transportation for the San Francisco Chronicle, on KQED Forum Wednesday…

San Francisco, which moved up from third place in 2012, registered 48 percent congestion in the morning peak and 66 percent in evening rush hour. The single most congested day of the year was Nov. 22, 2013. Nobody knows why, although that day was the Friday before Thanksgiving week began, which is typically a chaotic period, with lots of comings and goings…. (more)

When are the citizens of San Francisco going to realize that the SFMTA is not to be trusted to fix the problem they created? Removing parking is a huge contributor to the gridlock. We need oversight and accountability and you can insist on this by signing this petition and voicing your concerns in the comments to the recipients:
Restore Parking Oversight of SFMTA

 

Traffic Trouble, Parking Problems, Fondled Food At Levi’s Stadium For Chile Vs. Mexico Soccer Game

by Nicole Jones : cbslocal – excerpt

For $60 a car, you’d think parking lots could provide signage, and for a region preparing for a Super Bowl, there is a serious amount of logistical coordination to get straightened out to avoid over 3 hours sitting in traffic in a “Candlestick Park”-like moment. And did I mention the security guard fondled my sandwich? What contraband could I possible have smuggled in between two delicious pieces of sourdough bread?

First let me start by disclosing that I am not a huge sports fan, making the whole ordeal that much more of a bitter pill to swallow.

Here’s where it all began.

When invited to Saturday’s Chile vs. Mexico soccer game at Levi’s Stadium, I gave an enthusiastic “yes.” My husband and I, both Chileans, were pumped to wave our 5-foot flag among a sea of red and green Mexican jerseys.

It didn’t take long before our excitement turned sour — and not the good kind you make with Pisco… (more)

Bad reviews and complaints keep coming.
Sports fans beware!

Plan would add 64 parking spaces at Ferry Building

: bizjournals.com – excerpt

A 64-space weekday parking lot would be created on the plaza next to the Ferry building under a proposal being floated by operator Equity Office Properties and the Port of San Francisco.
The new parking, which merchants say is sorely needed, would be part of a broader plan to activate the plaza. In addition to parking, the plaza would become home to events like ice cream fairs, harvest festivals, and antique flea markets. Two-hour parking would be allowed there from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday through Friday.
The plan, set to be discussed today in front of the Port Commission, is an effort by EOP to generate more revenue from the gourmet food hall, which does not break even despite attracting more than 1 million visitors a year… (more)

Is the Port Commission rethinking their anti-car attitude as their up-scale tenants demand more parking? Will merchants in other neighborhoods demand the same consideration?