Lawmaker wants to establish a ‘Parking Bill of Rights’ for California

by Dianne de Guzman : sfgate – excerpt

Prohibiting cities from ticketing motorists who park at broken meters. This is already a law in California, but is set to expire at the end of the year.

Any California driver who has been on the receiving end of a parking violation might perk up at a set of proposed reforms to our current state of parking laws.

Legislation debuted by Assemblyman Mike Gatto, D-Glendale, on Tuesday is looking to save you all from the tricky world of parking policies set by city government.

Dubbed the “Parking Bill of Rights,” the set of reforms is just a list of ways that Gatto hopes to improve the state of parking laws in California.

“Occasionally, the state needs to step in and remind our local governments that parking a vehicle should be an efficient practice, and not another big hassle designed to separate motorists from their money,” Gatto said in a released statement. “These simple and practical policy changes will make life easier for Californians who just want to park their cars and go about their business.”…

Most San Franciscans will also be thrilled with Gatto’s call to make spaces immediately available once street cleaning has been performed. The reasons behind the measures, Gatto said, is to “end some of the most unfair and unjust parking practices throughout the state.”…

“It is to the point where cities are using these tickets as another source of revenue, almost a hidden tax. I think cities can be a little more straightforward,” Gatto said in an interview with KCBS Radio. “But gouging people with these outrageous fines, I think is the wrong way to go.”… (more)

Assembly Member Mike Gatto of Glendale, seems to be on the drivers’ side. Find out more about him and perhaps suggest some more legislation to protect drivers. http://asmdc.org/members/a43/

CASTRO RESIDENTS UPSET OVER TECH BUS STOP LOCATION

While this shuttle stop in the Castro has been part of a pilot program, it’s supposed to be a permanent fixture in February. Still, the MTA says there is always room for discussion.

“It really takes cars off the streets, it reduces gas emissions and it does a number of things that make our transportation network better,” Paul Rose, a spokesperson with the MTA, said. “We’re open top their feedback, we’re open to their input and we want to make sure we’re reaching as many people as possible.”

In the past 18 months the city has collected $2.5 million for the right to use these shuttle bus stops… (more)