San Franciscans Get Taken For a Ride — a price comparison of bike shares from around the world.

By Ben : medium – excerpt (includes charts)

More Ford Bikes on stands that take up way too much space. Private bikes could easily park between the Ford bike racks to take advantage of all that wasted space. Photos by zrants

Over the past few months I’ve read article after article debating the expansion of the Ford GoBikes in San Francisco. Each article discusses the pros and cons of using the system without comparing the cost of similar systems currently operating in other cities around the world. I decided to do a little bit of research regarding the cost per user as many citizens feel the prices are a bit more expensive than they should be. Here are some of my unscientific findings… Not interested in the wall of text? Skip to the charts… (more)

The Real Reason Behind Ford’s Move Into Bike-Sharing

By John Rosevear : fool – excerpt

Why would an auto giant want to start an urban bike-sharing business? Here’s a hint: It’s not about the bikes.

Ford Motor Company surprised investors with a pair of “mobility”-related announcements last week. It said it’s buying Chariot, a crowdsourced shuttle-bus service, and that it will create a Ford-branded urban bike-sharing program in conjunction with bike-sharing leader Motivate.

If you’ve been listening to Ford CEO Mark Fields’ recent statements around the Blue Oval’s interest in “personal mobility,” the purchase of Chariot makes some sense. But many investors were left scratching their heads over the bike-sharing thing. What does Ford, of all companies, want with bicycles?

It turns out the bikes have a lot to do with the shuttle buses. Read on.

How the bikes fit in with the shuttles

Jim Hackett is the CEO of Ford Smart Mobility LLC, a subsidiary created to “design, build, grow and invest in emerging mobility services.” The LLC is a big part of Fields’ plan to expand Ford’s business into transportation services beyond traditional vehicle ownership. It’s the entity that is buying Chariot and launching the bike service… (more)

How is This Official SFGov SFMTA Red-Painted Parking Space Labelled “CAR SHARE” If It’s Only for Avis RENTAL CAR?

sfcitizen – excerpt

Help me out here, Gentle Reader. This formerly public parking space is now a private parking space, one that’s being rented out to Avis Rent a Car System, LLC, aka the Avis Budget Group.

But Avis isn’t actually “sharing” cars with you, it’s renting cars to you, right?

Is this what they call “framing?” Why is the SFMTA “framing” issues for Avis this way? Was Ron Conway involved with this? David Chiu?… (more)

What separates the “sharing” economy from the rental industry? When you pay for use by time, isn’t that a rental? When is the policy of picking winners and losers contract interference? Is a government agency allowed to discriminate in ways a private entity cannot?

2 property tax bills: 1 for condo, 1 for parking space

By C.W. Nevius : sfchronicle – excerpt

When a tax measure to help pay San Francisco Unified School District teachers was proposed in 2008, Richard La Rose was an enthusiastic supporter. As a teacher at a private institution, La Rose wouldn’t directly benefit, but he didn’t mind paying the annual fee, which he says is $259.20.

He just didn’t expect to pay it twice.

La Rose, like some other residents, is taxed once for his one-bedroom condo and a second time for his parking space. Since the parking spot was sold separately it has its own deed, which is now a common practice among developers. That means he is considered to have two parcels.

“I went to the tax office, and I said I didn’t see why I should have to pay twice,” La Rose said. “They said, ‘Yeah, we get that complaint all the time, but there’s nothing we can do.’”… (more)

RELATED:
An Unintended Consequence of Unbundling Parking from Housing
Transportation and affordable housing advocates advocate unbundling parking from housing to provide an incentive to own fewer vehicles while reducing housing costs and increasing supply. But should parcel taxes be applied to parking spaces?... (more)

BART’s full parking lots top Mr. Roadshow’s ‘Dirty Dozen’ list

By Gary Richards : mercurynews – excerpt

Dave Perry tried to do the right thing and take BART from the East Bay to San Francisco International Airport. But when he couldn’t find a parking spot at the Dublin-Pleasanton station, he ended up driving, putting one more solo vehicle on the Bay Area’s jammed freeways.
He’s not alone. If you’re trying to find a parking space at a BART station, good luck.
The scarcity of BART parking is the top gripe on Mr. Roadshow’s complaint line this year, making it the first time a highway has not held the top spot in the dozen years the “Dirty Dozen” list has been compiled….
“Until parking can be improved in the East Bay, I wonder how many cars are in traffic because they have given up on mass transit due to the time and frustration involved with finding something as simple as a parking spot,” Perry said…
It would help on a lot of these stretches if more people took BART. If only they could park there… (more)

The parking management plan has not worked out the way it was visioned by urban planners. Eliminating parking and removing traffic lanes is increasing traffic congestion. We need to change course and make it easy for people to take pubic transit by establishing public parking near transit hubs and freeway exits.

RELATED:
The roads we hate and the changes we like

SF Planning Commission Approves New Bike Parking Plan

KCBS – excerpt

SAN FRANCISCO (KCBS) – Bicyclists in San Francisco may soon find it a lot easier to find a parking space for their two-wheelers.
The San Francisco Planning Commission on Thursday approved a plan to increase bicycle parking in both residential and commercial areas of the City. The next stop for the bike parking plan: the full Board of Supervisors… (more)

They left out the request for showers and lockers in the work places where the cyclists to change and freshen up after cycling to work. Do regular folks get to use the facilities or will this perk be reserved by cyclists only?

 

RELATED:
Planning Commission Approves Higher Bike Parking Requirements
New buildings in San Francisco will be required to provide more secure bike parking under legislation approved by the Planning Commission yesterday. The ordinance is expected to be approved by the Board of Supervisors next month…
the ordinance will overhaul bike parking requirements for new residential and commercial buildings citywide,…
The Planning Commission voted to remove the “active use” provision, so providing bike parking within 25 feet of the front of a building will still require a permit. The alternative is to place the bike parking closer to the rear of a building or on a different floor.
The strongest opponent of re-defining bike parking as an active use was Commissioner Katherine Moore. While she fully supported the rest of the ordinance, she said that a parked bicycle “is an inanimate object, not an active use.”… (more)