SF may no longer require housing developers to build parking

By Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez : sfexaminer – excerpt

If you build it, they will come, the saying goes. But that’s exactly the problem when it comes to cars.

City leaders say requiring developers to build parking spaces in new projects invites too many new cars into The City, congesting streets and harming the environment.

Now Supervisor Jane Kim is seeking to rescind a requirement that developers create minimum amounts of parking when they build new housing or commercial property, as part of a larger effort to reform a city policy called “Better Streets.”… (more)

This kind of logic is what got us on the five worst traffic in the world list.

Area Q Public Hearing Shows a Neighborhood Divided

hoodline – excerpt

Area Q

Yesterday, a public hearing was held at City Hall to discuss the ever-controversial issue of residential parking permits being proposed for the region around Alamo Square dubbed “Area Q.”

Turnout at the hearing was noticeably smaller than at the November 10th meeting at San Francisco Day School. At that meeting, the auditorium was filled with 160+ attendees. About 50 or so people spoke at that meeting, offering a variety of opinions. As a result, the SFMTA revisited the plan and made significant changes based on feedback.

Yesterday’s hearing, on the other hand, was held at City Hall — well outside the area being discussed — and took place at 10am on a workday, which likely presented a challenge for those with day jobs or other commitments. All in all, about 70 people filled the hearing room yesterday, and of the 35 or so people who spoke, the vast majority expressed strong opposition to the parking permit proposal… (more)

Proof that the war on cars is responsible for the anger on our streets. The best way to calm that anger is to stop the war on cars the way Feds are now attempting to stop the war on drugs. Stop the war. Let the citizens of San Francisco catch their breath and catch up with all the changes… Tell the Supervisors that you want them to take back accountability the SFMTA. Sigh the petition:

http://pol.moveon.org/signon/sign/restore-parking-oversight

I Made A Mistake: Went to San Francisco

By Peter Wallace : hngnews – excerpt

I won’t be back to San Francisco again unless my work requires it.

When I was in San Francisco on business last week I made a mistake.  I feel especially foolish because I know the city’s reputation – no, not that one – the one about parking.  In fact, a comedian does a routine about how the parking signs in San Francisco are so convoluted that it takes a lawyer to decipher them.

So, here’s what happened.  You tell me if you would have done the same thing…

So, while I did not leave my heart in San Francisco, I did leave $88 for the ticket, $4 for the money I put into the meter, and whatever I paid for lunch.

I find it interesting that cities that depend on tourism also predate on tourists, but I guess that’s another topic all together.

I won’t be back to San Francisco again unless my work requires it.  I’ll also encourage people who do go there to park wherever they want, since they’ll probably get a ticket anyway.  Just budget for $88.  Unless, of course, you plan to park on an elderly nun, in which case you might want to bring $98… (more)

More fallout from the San Francisco parking wars of 2014.

Carshare reserved parking not favored by everyone

By David Stevenson : ktvu – excerpt

SAN FRANCISCO —

City CarShare user, Jessica Martinson says she never has trouble finding parking in San Francisco.

“I have parking magic,” laughed Martinson.

Martinson now also has 22 new curbside spots specifically set aside for drivers like her, including a formerly metered spot on Clement Avenue near 24th Avenue in the city’s Richmond district. It was converted to car share-only just a few days ago.

The goal of the program is to encourage car share use. Transit officials say every shared car takes dozens more off the road.  But not everyone on this busy block is happy to see this space set aside… (more)

Newsflash! San Francisco has a privileged class.

The Sharing Economy is the Stealing Economy.

The public nonprofit City Car Share, that should be promoting public good will has teamed up with the SFMTA to take public street parking from the public, thereby angering the public they both claim to serve. And they claim they are doing it for you! The only option left to the public is to sue them, which many are doing, or vote against them. Voting is cheaper. Vote No on A and B and Yes on L to send a strong message to city authorities that you do not support the SFMTA.

Costly New Parking Garages Still Gobbling Up Land at BART Stations

by : sf.streetsblog – excerpt

BART continues to encourage the construction of multi-story parking garages at its stations, despite the exorbitant costs and lost potential for valuable land that could be put to better use…

Livable City Executive Director Tom Radulovich, who sits on the BART board, said he’s “appalled that we wasted tens of millions of dollars building a commuter garage at an urban station like MacArthur.”

“Ridership kept growing at that station despite the reduction in parking during construction, which demonstrates that we could have done perfectly well without it,” he said. “Many of our highest-ridership stations — Balboa Park, Berkeley, 19th, 16th, 24th, Glen Park — have little or no commuter parking. At stations like MacArthur, Ashby, West Oakland, and Lake Merritt, we should be phasing out parking as we build transit villages, and enhance walking, cycling, and local transit access instead of building structured parking.”… (more)

What happened to customer service? BART is trying to bring it back by building more garages and extending late night hours by partnering with bus lines:
BART to try late-night bus service for passengers

In spite of the BART Director, the majority of elected BART Board members appear to be more inclined to listen to their customers than the appointed SFMTA Board. That may be why many SF residents are planning to vote No vote on Props A and B and Yes on L.

Citizens want more parking garages built near freeway exits and transit hubs and do not expect to have their wishes met by the current MTA Board. Transportation issues along with housing will determine the outcome of some Supervisor races as voters become ever more fed up with gridlock and the parking wars. And, as Engardio points out in the sfexaminer, Commuters can have a say on BART service. Do your own research before you vote on anything. Make sure you are voting for your interests, because no on else is.

San Francisco Transportation Funding Ballot Measure

by alevin : greencaltrain – excerpt

On July 22, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors voted to place a transportation measure on the ballot, supported by Supervisor Wiener, to fund Muni and active transportation in proportion to population growth…

The San Francisco ballot in 2014 will also include a $500 Million General Obligation (GO) bond to pay for transportation capital improvements, improving Muni reliability and speed, planning for the downtown extension and funding pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure…

Meanwhile, opponents of transit and active transportation have launched a ballot measure to end San Francisco’s transit-first policy, freeze parking rates and build more parking supply… (more)

Three ballot measures on the November ballot. Two asking for more money and one asking for more balance. Voters will cast their opinions on SFMTA priorities that have created gridlock and eliminated thousands of parking spaces in the last two years. Citizens and public officials are demanding accountability.

 

Should S.F. make it easier or harder to drive and park in the city?

Business Pulse – Polls and Surveys : bizjournals – excerpt

Easier. Most people still drive; deal with it. 41%

Harder. More cars will just mean more gridlock. 25%

Neither. Transit vs. cars doesn’t have to be either/or 33%

Votes Cast: 221

VOTE NOW: http://www.bizjournals.com/sanfrancisco/poll/poll/15073351#comments

This survey is not a scientific sampling, but offers a quick view of what readers are thinking