Tired of that pothole? Report it today and DPW will fix it in June as part of Fewer Potholes Month

By Sarah B : Richmondsblog – excerpt

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I adopted Carolina (between 16th and 17th Streets) because the street is one large pothole that and wins the prize as the largest continuous pothole in town. photo by Zrants.

We’ve all been there. You’re driving down a street in the Richmond District when, BAM, your wheel hits a pothole, rattling your vehicle and making you grit your teeth in frustration. Inevitably you ask, “Why can’t this city keep our roads in good shape?”.

Our new District 1 Supervisor Sandra Fewer wants to do something about it. She has declared June to be “Fewer Potholes Month” in the Richmond District and has convinced the Department of Public Works to commit a repair crew EXCLUSIVELY to the neighborhood for the month to repair all potholes reported by residents.

That’s where you come in – we need your pothole reports!…(more details and the application form attached.)

Our state government passed a gas tax to fix the roads so let’s fix the potholes. Thanks to Supervisor Fewer for taking this on. Other supervisors need to join the “Fewer Potholes” movement. Invite your constituents to adopt their favorites.

This is the one thing everyone agrees on. Potholes effect ALL MODES of travelers, creating dangerous conditions for everyone who must deal with them. This often involves by swerving in and out of lanes to avoid them or slowing down as you approach them, and creates unnecessary friction between cars and bikes. Bus riders complain of “bumpy rides” and lose precious moments as the drivers are forced to slowing down or swerve to avoid them on the narrow streets. We spend millions of dollars a year on repair bills. Fix the Potholes now! Report details:

File a complaint with DPW. Take a picture. Make note of the address. File a report on it with DPW using the Mayor’s 311 complaint system. You may call 311 and speak to an operator but this can be time-consuming. It may be easier to file a complaint online http://sf311.org to get it entered into the record. They claim that all feedback is linked to the 311 system and offer you a referral number, which you can use to check on the status of your pothole. If you use that system report back on how long it takes to get it fixed.

New App Helps Dogpatch Residents Report Neighborhood Problems

by potreroview – excerpt
In March, a new website, Dogpatch Solutions Tracker, launched at https://dogpatch.dillilabs.com. A community service aiming to improve neighborhood safety and cleanliness, the site features a digital map application where registered users can pinpoint such concerns as potholes, graffiti, trash, and vandalism in Dogpatch and Potrero Hill…(more)

Nearly $1 billion in side deals for California gas tax approved

by Kate Murphy of bayareanewsgroup : eastbaytimes – excerpt (video linked)

SACRAMENTO — Nearly $1 billion in controversial side deals that may have persuaded key California lawmakers to get behind a controversial gas tax this month cleared the Legislature Monday.

In the lead-up to the April 6 gas-tax vote, funding for a handful of transportation projects surfaced in a separate bill, Senate Bill 132. The projects will benefit the districts represented by Assemblyman Adam Gray, D-Merced; Sen. Anthony Cannella, R-Ceres; Assemblywoman Sabrina Cervantes, D-Corona, and Sen. Richard Roth, D-Riverside.

All four lawmakers voted in favor of the gas tax — which passed narrowly, without a vote to spare.

Also part of the deal — and passed Monday — was Senate Bill 496, by Cannella, that would protect architects, engineers and other “design professionals” against legal claims made by public agencies. Cannella is an engineer.

The gas tax will generate more than $5 billion per year for road repairs and local transit projects by indefinitely increasing gas and diesel taxes and hiking vehicle registration fees. The increases will cost the average driver roughly $10 per month or less, the state estimates…(more)

They just called it a pothole gas tax. There is no guarantee on what will happen to the funds raised by the tax, other than special interests will benefit from it. Potholes effect everyone negatively. Fixing them is the most democratic use of public funds. Fixing them would reduce the costs of public transit repairs and make biking and walking a lot safer. SFMTA is literally painting over potholes to create red lanes and bike paths, making them more hazardous with the slick paint.

If you want to do something positive about potholes, join the international “Adopt a Pothole” movement:
https://metermadness.wordpress.com/adopt-a-pothole/

Gov. Brown In Riverside Pushing For Gas Tax Hikes

losangeles.cbslocal – excerpt (video included)

Potholes on Carolina Street.

RIVERSIDE (CBSLA.com) —Gov. Jerry Brown joined state and local representatives in Riverside Tuesday to push for a bill that would raise gasoline taxes and vehicle license fees to pay for road repairs.

The Road Repair & Accountability Act of 2017 is expected to generate an estimated $5.2 billion a year.

Senate Bill 1 seeks to raise gas taxes by 12 cents per gallon, hike the vehicle registration fee to $48 a year on average and require drivers of electric vehicles to pay and extra $100 per year.

Senate Bill 1 seeks to raise gas taxes by 12 cents per gallon, hike the vehicle registration fee to $48 a year on average and require drivers of electric vehicles to pay and extra $100 per year.

The pump price hikes would cost drivers about $10 a month, according to the governor’s office…

President Pro Tem Kevin de Leon, D-Los Angeles, said the bill will contain a lockbox that will make sure the money can only be spent on roads and bridges.

“All transportation dollars will be in that lockbox and used exclusively for our roads and for transportation,” de Leon said…(more)

As we know the two paragraphs are not the same. roads and bridges does not mean roads and transportation. We have been done this tax road before. It is still a crooked road full of false promises.

 

Adopt a Pothole

Don’t just complain about potholes. Do something about them.
Nextdoor conversations prompted a new site for adopting potholes.
Join us and adopt one of your own. https://dogpatch.dillilabs.com
Locate your pothole on the map and upload a photo of it.

File a complaint with DPW. Take a picture. Make note of the address. File a report on it with DPW using the Mayor’s 311 complaint system. You may call 311 and speak to an operator but this can be time-consuming. It may be easier to file a complaint online http://sf311.org to get it entered into the record. They claim that all feedback is linked to the 311 system and offer you a referral number, which you can use to check on the status of your pothole. If you use that system report back on how long it takes to get it fixed.

See how other people have dealt with their potholes.
There is a international effort to “adopt a pothole” you may want to look into. Google it and you will see a lot of complaints. My favorite is this one from India: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1dIdJ53T…
The creativity is endless. Here is another good one.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jx0OcpZ7…

Would higher gas tax fill our spreading potholes?

By Gary Richards : mercurynews – excerpt

With heavy storms wreaking havoc on California roads to the tune of $600 million — damages that Caltrans says could top $1 billion by spring — Bay Area traffic heavyweights joined forces Monday to push for higher gas taxes and auto registration fees to raise $6 billion a year for the state’s dilapidated roads.

“It is fiscally irresponsible to wait until our roads fail,” said State Sen. Jim Beall, D-San Jose, chairman of the state Senate Transportation Committee, at a press conference to garner support for his gas tax bill. “We can’t ignore repairs. Eventually, we have to pay.”

SB-1 would hike the state gas tax by 12 cents a gallon over three years, charge electric cars an annual fee of $100 and increase the registration for all vehicles by $38. San Jose would be one of the big winners, getting $39 million a year from Beall’s measure, with $19 million more coming from the Measure B sales tax approved in November. San Jose transportation director Jim Ortbal called it a game changer, “huge.”…

Republicans and the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association, however, oppose any tax increases and, instead, want to divert money from the high-speed rail project and the state’s general fund to filling potholes…

But Beall doesn’t want the general fund touched for road repairs. “That’s a non-starter,” he said. “No way.”

Coupal suggests taking nearly $9 billion in bonds from high-speed rail for road construction.

“If voter approval is deemed necessary,” Coupal said, “that measure passes in a heartbeat.”… (more)

Here comes Lucy again with the football. What are the chances she will not pull it away again?

RELATED:
Gas tax proposed to help pay for much-needed San Jose road repairs: (video included)

San Francisco roads deemed worst in nation again

By Adam Brinklaw : sf.streetsblog – excerpt

RedPothole.jpg

What we have known all along

Once again the Washington DC-based transit research group TRIP declared San Francisco and Oakland together to have the worst roads in the entire country.

While this may be something of a vindicating moment for Bay Area drivers who have known this for eons, it’s a grim day when road watchers afford even Los Angeles’s famously terrible blacktop more palatable scores than our own.

(They’re the second worst this year, another repeat performance.)

Before continuing, it’s worth noting that most of TRIP’s funding comes from the likes of insurance companies and construction unions—groups that do stand to gain directly from increased road maintenance spending.

But the actual data comes from the Federal Highway Administration, who in turn get it from local agencies… (more)

When you put people who hate roads in charge of road maintenance what do you expect? We have red lanes painted over potholes on Mission Street because SFMTA doesn’t care about potholes. We got an estimate of $10 -16 per square foot to paint the red lanes and between $2 and 6 million for the Mission Street red carpet mess. The figures were not consistent from one meeting to the next, an the media figures also shifted so it’s hard to say exactly what the price for the Experimental Red Lanes on Mission Street is. How many potholes could they have repaired for the money they spent on red paint? They could possibly have fixed most of the potholes in the Mission for what they spent on paint, and what they will spend to maintain that lovely fading pint look.

potholes

 

 

It’s no Joke! Unless You let Them get away with it again. Looks like the voters didn’t go for it this time!

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Why plunging asphalt prices haven’t sparked an infrastructure boom

By Rayhanul Ibrahim : yahoo – excerpt

NY-pothole.jpg

A massive NYC pothole. (Image: Wikimedia Commons)

If you haven’t repaved your driveway or parking lot yet, now might be the time to do so.

Over the past 18 months, asphalt prices have plummeted from about $600 to a ton to about $300 a ton. That’s because petroleum prices dropped during the same time period, and that’s the biggest cost factor for asphalt mix, which is needed for driveways, parking lots and roads.

At first blush, it may seem like falling asphalt prices would be a boon for public-road building contractors. You’d think governments would want to get as much road work done right now before the price of asphalt starts to rise again. In theory, this explosion of construction would boost contractor revenue in the short-term while helping improve our roads.

Seems like a win-win scenario, right?

It turns out falling asphalt prices haven’t been such a boon for contractors because governments have very limited annual funding for infrastructure improvement like new roads, according to T. Carter Ross, spokesperson for the National Asphalt Pavement Association. Governments can’t take advantage of low asphalt prices to give contractors much more work, because they’re already using all the funding they have for roads every year.

“The amount of work our road system needs far outstrips the available funding at every level,” T. Carter Ross said to Yahoo Finance.

To be sure, roads partly pay for themselves, via tolls and state and federal taxes added to the cost of gas for your car. However, gas taxes and motor vehicle license fees covered just 41.4% of funding for road construction in 2013, the last year for which data is available, according to the Tax Foundation. That tax-focused think tank further noted that this ratio is likely to fall over time “as state gas tax rates do not keep up with inflation.”

The state of roads may be particularly bad because for over a decade before 2015, the US went without a long-term federal bill for road funding. While Congress finally passed a five-year bill to fund roads and other infrastructure projects in 2015, it hasn’t been sufficient to compensate for years of underfunding.

Last year, the Business Roundtable — a pro-business association of CEOs — put out a paper noting “much of the nation’s infrastructure has fallen victim to neglect, underfunding, under-appreciation and the natural erosion that comes with age.”

To be clear, local governments may be able to use the low price of asphalt to repave a few more of these eroded roads than they would if asphalt were more expensive. They could also be getting some more bang for their buck because contractors might end up lowering their bids to compensate for the lower cost of the asphalt, according to Carter Ross.

Unfortunately, the number of newly paved roads will be limited since local governments can’t ramp their spending up too much — even though it doesn’t make economic sense to defer the spending to the future when asphalt will likely be priced higher…(more)

JUST THE FACTS
U.S. Economy Would Benefit from Rebuilding America’s Transportation Infrastructure
In Road to Growth: The Case for Investing in America’s Transportation Infrastructure,
Business Roundtable outlines the economic cost of neglecting the nation’s
transportation infrastructure and the positive effects of rebuilding it for the 21st century:
◗ America Is No. 16: The United States’ overall infrastructure quality ranks 16th, behind Germany, France and Japan.
◗ Highways and Bridges: Urban highway congestion cost the economy more than $120 billion in 2011, and nearly one in four bridges in the national highway system is structurally deficient or functionally obsolete.
◗ Waterways and Ports: Lock delays, port congestion and lack of facilities for larger ships added $33 billion to the cost of U.S. products in 2010.
◗ Aviation: The United States is home to just four of the world’s top 50 airports, and aviation congestion and delays cost the economy $24 billion in 2012.
◗ Transit Rail: Only 25 percent of transit rail station infrastructure is rated “good” or “excellent.”
Increased investment in public infrastructure leads to significant economic benefits:
◗ Up to $320 billion in economic output would be generated in 2020 if U.S. infrastructure investment were boosted by 1 percent of GDP per year.
◗ 1.7 million jobs would be created over the first three years by an $83 billion infrastructure package.
◗ As much as $3 in economic activity is created by every $1 invested in infrastructure. The nation’s leaders can change course and rebuild this vital national asset. It’s time to strengthen our economic foundation by reinvesting in transportation
infrastructure. Learn more about how investment in America’s transportation infrastructure will pay off for all of us at brt.org/road-to-growth.
Business Roundtable CEO members lead companies with $7.2 trillion in annual revenues and nearly 16 million employees. Business Roundtable member companies comprise more than a quarter of the total market capitalization of U.S. stock markets and invest $190 billion annually in research and development — equal to 70 percent of U.S. private R&D spending. Our companies pay more than $230 billion in dividends to shareholders and generate more than $470 billion in sales for small and medium-sized businesses annually. Business Roundtable companies also make more than $3 billion a year in charitable contributions.  Please visit us at www.brt.org, check us out on Facebook and LinkedIn, and follow us on Twitter… (more)

 

LA Potholes have a web site. Should SF have one too?

lapotholes.com – excerpt

Where the Rubber Hits the Road: Navigating the Mean Streets of Los Angeles Tired of the mean streets of L.A.? Potholes getting in the way of your smooth commute? Sunken asphalt, trenches, buckled and cracked roads getting on your nerves? Not to mention the damage to your pocketbook to repair your car?

Time to fight back.

Let’s give City Hall a message: Fix our streets.

Send us an E-mail with a picture of your favorite pothole or bad road, and we’ll post it to this Blog and forward it to the powers that be. Use our handy Pot Shots outline(more)

 Do the potholes of SF deserve a web site?

Bike Lanes that work and those that don’t

Unpaved Bike lanes on Potrero Avenue. Very few bikes on this street, which is a major freeway access point to 101 and 280 South as well as Bayview and Cesar Chavez. Neighbors object to the Potrero Plan to reduce traffic and parking by widening the sidewalk and putting in more bike lanes. There are nearby streets with NO TRAFFIC which are better suited for bikes. That is where they are now.

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Repaved Bike lanes on 17th Street. Many bikes use this street. Note the one side of the street where the trucks loading food MUST park in the bike lane. This is a long-established kitchen that is used by the non-profits that serve the area. They were here long before the bike lanes were put in. This neighborhood is full of PDRs that require motor vehicles to do their work. This is why the NE Mission wants to be left alone by the SFMTA. We all get along here.

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RELATED:
Cyclist Hospitalized After Striking Streetcar