Prop. A aims to help city with transit upgrades

by sfexaminer -excerpt

One of three transportation measures on the November ballot, Proposition A would allow San Francisco to borrow up to $500 million by issuing general-obligation bonds to go toward improving its transit infrastructure and aging roads…

Prop. A permits a property-tax increase to pay for the bonds if necessary, and landlords could pass up to 50 percent of the tax increase to tenants. According to projections from City Controller Ben Rosenfield, the highest estimated annual property tax for a homeowner with an assessed value of $500,000 would be about $91.02.

Groups including Save Muni, the San Francisco Taxpayers Association and Libertarian Party of San Francisco allege the proposition will raise property taxes and rent. Save Muni founding member Howard Wong said the proposition would incur $1 billion in new debt over a few decades with no guarantee of making Muni more reliable…

SFMTA funding, parking fees are on ballot with Props. B, L

Joining Proposition A, which transit officials and advocates are counting on for a reliable source of funding for infrastructure work, two more transit measures are on the November ballot. These, propositions B and L, seek to take The City’s transportation system in different directions.

A transit-funding measure like Prop. A, Proposition B would amend the City Charter to allocate a greater amount of the general fund toward the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency each year, based on population growth…

Opponents argue Prop. B would take general fund money away from other programs.

Prop. L was sparked in April from a dozen San Francisco residents who wanted to reboot transit policies back to 2009, before Sunday parking meters and demand responsive meter pricing went into effect and meters got installed in certain neighborhoods.

“It’s simply getting back on a balanced course in San Francisco which we have had for 50 years in The City until then,” said Chris Bowman, 68, a Twin Peaks resident and one of the original proponents of the proposition… (more)

A Brief History of Baseless Pro-Car/Anti-Bike Movements

By Rachel Dovey : publicceo – excerpt

A group of San Francisco activists wants equal rights for cars. Pushing a ballot measure that would limit parking fees, build garages and create a “Motorists Citizen Advisory Committee,” the people behind Restore Transportation Balance believe their city favors bikes and buses over the horseless carriage and that just isn’t the American way…

Theirs is only the latest in a string of initiatives, op-eds and lawsuits bemoaning the plight of auto owners. But in a country built for cars, where feds bail out the auto industry and pour billions into fuel subsidies every year, they sound a bit like property rights groups — majority shareholders grasping at slivers of lost privilege.

Here’s a rundown of pro-car movements that have emerged in the last few years (as Agenda 21 has, no doubt, tightened its red-knuckled fist), along with a list of ways that, in reality, public policy still favors these activists’ cars… (more)

1. Restore Transportation Balance, San Francisco…
2. Neighbors for Better Bike Lanes et al., Brooklyn…
3. The Faceless War on Cars, Seattle…