Breaking: Proposed Uber and Lyft per-ride surcharge could pump $30M a year into San Francisco’s coffers

By Joe Eskenazi : missionlocal – excerpt

Deal struck to drop proposed gross receipts tax on Uber, Lyft paves way for city to glean per-ride charges

Supervisor Aaron Peskin today confirmed that he’s dropped his plans to hit “Transportation Network Companies” — Uber, Lyft, etc. — with a gross receipts tax on their revenue. As such, the companies will acquiesce to a proposed per-ride surcharge, to be enabled by forthcoming state legislation from Assemblyman Phil Ting.

Peskin said the proposed 3.25-percent tax on every TNC ride in the city could result in users of Uber, Lyft,  et al. pumping $30 million a year into San Francisco’s municipal piggybank — and perhaps more in the future… (more)

We do need a bit of clarification on the meaning of this “deal”.  What is the goal of taxing the TNCs? To make money to control traffic and gridlock, or are there other issues the public would like to address and does this deal address those issues? SF is not the only city effected by this problem that has increased regional traffic as well. How will a fee solve the bad driving habits of ride-share drivers?\

Seattle did not settle on a small surcharge option.

RELATED:

Chinese bike share company to leave Seattle after city approves program, steep permit fees

By Matt Mokovich : komonews – excerpt

SEATTLE – Ofo is out. The Chinese-based and heavily funded bike share program said the City Council’s decision on Monday to impose an annual $250,000 permit fee for bike share companies wishing to operate in Seattle was too much…

“The exorbitant fees that accompany these new regulations -the highest in the country – make it impossible for Ofo to operate and effectively serve our riders,” Lina Feng, General Manager of Ofo Seattle said in a statement on Monday. “As a result, we will not be seeking a permit to continue operating in Seattle.”…(more)

Is this what it takes? $25000.00 fees. 

What Happens When a Company That Sells Car Trips Gets Into the Bike Trip Business?

By Ben Fried : streetsblog – excerpt

Lyft has acquired the nation’s largest bike-share company, setting up a situation where its bike trip sales will cannibalize its car trip sales.

Lyft, Uber’s smaller but gigantic-in-its-own-right competitor in the ride-hailing business, has acquired Motivate, the company that runs several of the largest bike-share systems in America. The price isn’t public yet, but unconfirmed earlier reports pegged it at $250 million. The new entity is called “Lyft Bikes.”

Lyft gets Motivate’s “current engineering, technology, marketing, communications, legal and supply chain capabilities as well as some human resources and finance functions,” according to a spokesperson. Lyft says the terms of contracts with local governments, including agreements with New York, Chicago, San Francisco and other large cities granting varying degrees of exclusivity, will not be affected…

This is a matter of dispute, that may be cause for legal action.

The optimist sees huge potential in the nation’s largest bike-share operator getting an infusion of capital…

The acquisition by Lyft could change this dynamicMotivate has yet to show what it can do with the dockless and electric-assist bicycles it’s been developing

The announcement yesterday renews Motivate’s relevance, with Lyft explicitly mentioning “dockless and pedal-assist electric bikes” as the type of “innovation” it intends to expedite…

The pessimistic take on the deal is that Lyft’s core businessselling car trips in cities — will put a ceiling on what it will do as a bike-share company. ..

I doubt that Lyft will enthusiastically try to convert its car trips to bike trips without some sort of prompt from policy makers. Bike-share is a very low-margin business. … (more)

As the author points out, there are many directions the company may take, and, since the future of bike stations is uncertain there is no reason to expand the most controversial bike-share programs that infuriates the public.

As one of the North Beach patrons asked when the Central Subway was being presented as an extendable program, “How can you aim a tunnel when you don’t know where it is going to end up?” We need to stop installing bike stations and see what the market does.

This matter will be addressed Tuesday at the SFCTA Meeting. around 10 AM in Room 250 at City Hall.  You may want to comment on Item 9 on the agenda – Adopt the Emerging Mobility Evaluation Report – ACTION*  resolutionenclosure  Including TNCs, on-demand, shared, ride-hails, autonomous vehicles, robots and drones – all those vehicles that are cluttering up the road that used to be full of our private vehicles. How many millions or billions of taxpayers dollars have gone into this failed system that was going to rid the city of cars?

Keep your letters going to the Board of Supervisors on this matter. We need to keep public funds out of the hands of these corporations that have informed us that they intend to take over our streets. Supervisor Cohen needs to hear from you as she is still supporting the Ford GoBikes, that are now the Lyft bikes. We also need to send a message to Supervisor Kim on that matter. NO MORE TAXPAYER FUNDS FOR CORPORATIONS. If they want to help low-income people they can do so with their own money.

RELATED:
Uber Poised to Make Investment in Lime Scooter-Rental Business

STOP THE CORPORATE TAKEOVER OF OUR STREETS.
Buy an electric scooter for #129 at Best Buy or a Moped for less than $400.

MTA seeking public input at hearing November 1, 20313 on Ordinance 5176, adopted October 18, 2013.

http://us1.campaign-archive2.com/?u=8a67b7ed1c346655efe70e279&id=2c4fd36ea2&e=3c358f6c1d

Blocks with proposed parking meters: These meters will have a rate of $0.50 per hour, will have no time limit, and will operate Monday through Saturday from 9am to 6pm and Sundays from 12pm to 6pm.

Coming soon (public hearing scheduled Nov 1, City Hall Room 416, at 10 am)

  • 18th Street, north side, between Alabama Street and Florida Street
  • Alabama Street, east side, from 18th Street to 120 feet northerly
  • Florida Street, east side, between 18th Street and Mariposa Street
  • Florida Street, east side, from Mariposa Street to 95 feet northerly
  • Mariposa Street, north side, between Bryant Street and Florida Street

To be considered this winter

  • Harrison Street, east side, between 16th Street and 17th Street
  • 17th Street, north side, between Folsom Street and Shotwell Street
  • Folsom Street, west side, from 17th Street to 275 feet northerly
  • Southwest corner of 17th and Shotwell
  • 18th Street, south side, between Shotwell Street and Harrison Street
  • South Van Ness, east side, between 16th Street and 17th Street
  • Shotwell, east side, from 18th Street to 270 feet southerly
  • Folsom Street, west side, from 18th Street to 270 feet southerly

11-1-2013Hearing

MTA announced a hearing on Ordinance 5176, adopted October 18, 2013 by posting a few flyers on poles. This is how they invite public input?

photo (2)

San Francisco faces tough transportation investment choices

By: Will Reisman : SFExaminer – excerpt

… Over the next 30 years, the region has roughly $3.2 billion to spend on transportation projects — a funding pot that is badly outpaced by the Bay Area’s long-term needs, meaning residents will have some tough decisions to make in the coming decades…
The website, www.sfbudgetczar.com, lays out an array of different options for San Francisco’s future. It also lists potential revenue options, which include congestion-pricing plans for automobiles or another half-cent sales tax measure. Those methods could generate an additional $4 billion to $6 billion for transportation goals… (more)