Rally with Seniors for Safe Streets this Friday

Friday, July 28, 2017 – 10:30am – 11:30am Masonic Ave & Geary Blvd

It is time for the San Francisco to make its streets safe and accessible for ALL seniors and people with disabilities!

For too long seniors and people with disabilities have had to navigate poorly maintained sidewalks and potholed and poorly-patched streets, and use crosswalks designed primarily for the able-bodied pedestrians.

As a result, seniors make up only 15 percent of the city’s population, yet account for over 40 percent of all traffic deaths in 2016, resulting from traffic crashes involving people walking.

Every year hundreds of pedestrians are injured or killed in traffic crashes. Since seniors are five times more at risk of dying from their injuries as those under 65, the majority of those who are severely hurt or lose their lives are seniors and members of the disability community. This year people like 76-year old Jeannie Yee who lost her life in Cow Hollow, 93-year old Ka Ben Wong who was killed in Russian Hill, and 77-year old Meda Hacopian who died near Lake Merced when she was struck by a car, have all been victims of unsafe streets!

Speak up for Seniors and People with Disabilities this Friday

Join Walk SF, Seniors and Disability Action, and members of the San Francisco Bay Area Families for Safe Streets in urging city and state officials to experience what it’s like to try to get around local streets every day as a senior, or as a person with one or more disabilities.

Rally with members of the community as they challenge legislators to walk or roll in “our shoes.” These safe street advocates will invite legislators to use wheelchairs, walkers, canes and other mobility devices and aids, as they attempt to cross Geary Boulevard at Masonic Avenue safely (two of the city’s high-injury corridors, the 13 percent of streets that make up 75 percent of all serious and fatal crashes).

For more information, or if you need transportation to the rally, contact: Pi Ra of Senior and Disability Action at 415.225.2080 or srira@sdaction.org.

We could ask for longer lights for cross the streets and street repair to make the streets less difficult to cross. It don’t take millions of dollars to change the timing on the traffic lights, or do a little pothole repair. What does it take for the SFMTA and other city agencies to do the quick, cheap fixes that don’t take years of planning and millions of dollars?

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Highway Bill Compromise Would Take Money From U.S. Banks

By Billy House and Cheyenne Hopkins : bloomberg – excerpt

Congress has until Friday to pass new highway funding

Negotiators from both chambers of Congress reached agreement Tuesday on a five-year, $305 billion U.S. highway plan, although several House members said they weren’t happy with how it’s funded, including cutting dividend payments to banks.

The highway measure also would revive the U.S. Export-Import Bank, a federal agency that helps American companies sell products overseas. Lawmakers have until Friday to enact a highway plan or pass another temporary extension of transportation funding, and House Speaker Paul Ryan, a Wisconsin Republican, said his chamber will vote on the bill this week… (more)

 

 

Senate Republicans Introduce Funding Plan for CA Infrastructure

cssrc – excerpt

Constitutional Amendment to Close Transportation Funding Loophole

… During the last 15 years, the voters have supported Constitutional Amendments to dedicate transportation taxes for transportation purposes.  Proposition 42 passed in 2002 with 69 percent support and promised that the sales tax on fuel for motor vehicles that all Californians pay would be used for maintaining and expanding our roads, highways and bridges.  Additionally, Proposition 22, approved by voters in 2010, promised that transportation taxes cannot be borrowed for non-transportation services.

Despite these constitutional guarantees, the Legislature found a loophole that allowed the diversion of transportation taxes to benefit the state’s General Fund, instead of using the money to fix our roads…

SCA 7 guarantees that the state abides by the original intent of Proposition 42 and other Constitutional amendments that sought to dedicate transportation taxes for transportation purposes.

“Our measure puts an end to this budgetary sleight-of-hand,” said Senator Huff. “It will ensure that every dollar we pay in transportation taxes and fees will be spent to build and repair our roads.”

If passed by the Legislature, SCA 7 will appear on the November, 2016 ballot(more)

S.F.’s Prop. A is first step on road to put driving last

By Phillip Matier and Andrew Ross : sfgate – excerpt

There’s a lot more to San Francisco’s $500 million Proposition A than fixing roads — it’s really the first step in a master plan to put buses, bikes and pedestrians on the fast track and move cars into the slow lane.

A close look at the projects that would be funded by Prop. A shows the overall plan calls for reducing miles of traffic lanes for cars, removing an unknown number of parking spaces and reducing stops on several Muni lines to enable the buses to cross town faster.

The biggest chunk — $142 million — would go into new traffic signals, crosswalks and other projects to speed Muni and make it safer to cross the street.

Market Street would get $90 million for rehabbing and upgrading Muni boarding islands, bike lanes, sidewalks, traffic signals and bus and streetcar service between Castro Street and the Embarcadero.

Prop. A would also provide $30 million to help repair or replace 40 escalators and elevators that are forever breaking down, many of them at stations shared by BART and Muni Metro… (more)

Don’t know if this is the first step, it is definitely the next step. SFMTA and their supporters are really on the block. Most critics of Prop A point to language that states the SFMTA “may” spend the money this way, which is not the same as saying the money “shall be spent this way.”

According to the city controller, passage of this bond will result in higher property taxes and those taxes may be passed through to renters.

The bottom line is do you trust SFMTA to do what it promises based on past performance? If the answer is “no” and you want the right to own a car, you will want to vote No on A and B and Yes on L. For more on why go here: http://savesfmuni.wordpress.com/

RELATED:
San Francisco, California To Vote On Anti-Motorist Bond Measure