Scoot cements permanent spot on SF streets

By Jerold Chinn : sfbay -excerpt

We weren’t aware that any paint or cement would be used to put this program into effect.

Electric shared moped company Scoot will now become a permanent fixture in San Francisco’s ever-evolving world of shared ride services.

Under a permanent permit program approved by the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency Board of Directors at its Tuesday meeting, Scoot’s 19,000 members will be able to park in residential parking permitted areas, parking in motorcycle stalls for free, and in between metered parallel parking spaces.

In return, Scoot will pay a permit fee of $325 a year for each moped. The company will also have to provide data to the SFMTA in order for the transit agency to address any issues that might arise, said Andy Thornley, a senior analyst with the SFMTA Sustainable Streets Division:.. (more)

We are requesting a Continuance on the hearing on Thursday the Planning Commission on July 6th, 2017. A sample letter is here: https://discoveryink.wordpress.com/scoot-program/

Major confusion persists among various members of the public over what the “proposed” program to allow Scoot only shared vehicles to park for free. Where and when and for how long and how this will effect the public is not understood by many members of the public yet. Those of us who were at the meeting left confused over what had happened.

It appears that the proposal over where the privileged parking would be as presented by staff, was reversed in an amendment at the MTA Board meeting, and that this amendment ran counter to staff recommendations; the Amendment was not unanimously supported by the Board; Ed Reiskin and two other Board members cautioned against the Amendment; and at least one member of the public was denied entry to speak during public comment.

If a private vehicle is “pinned in” by a Scoot and can’t move in time to avoid a ticket, will the owner be ticketed anyway? Or should they they just push the Scoot over to get out?

 

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Two-Wheelers on the Rails

Bicyclists are not the only ones who have problems with rails. All two-wheelers need to be careful around them. We just passed by a motorcyle on the ground with two people wearing helmets standing by it on Third Street. They were straddling two south facing lanes. We were driving north. They were near a well-lit intersection so we assume they were safe.

This is a reminder to everyone on two wheels to avoid driving on the rails. Just avoid them if you can, and if you must drive across them, try to do so at or near a 90 degree angle to avoid a spill. This is especially important in the rain.

E-bikes: Love them or hate ‘em, our readers have some strong opinions

Special to National Post : news.nationalpost.com – excerpt

We asked for your e-bike stories and you responded. Here are just a few:
I live downtown and have ridden an e-bike for over five years. I also am a cyclist with a traditional bike, a motorist, a rollerblader and a pedestrian, so I have seen the increase in adoption of e-bikes from many angles. One goal for e-bikes was to get people out of their cars. I think it has done that. Most of the objections to e-bikes seem to come from my fellow cyclists. There are a whole myriad of objections – e-bikes don’t follow the rules, they’re too fast, they’re too quiet, etc. To touch on just these three: Laws Some e-bikers don’t follow the laws; Many more cyclists disobey the laws. Speed E-bikes are restricted to 32 km/h; Many cyclists go a lot faster than that. Noise What is quieter than a regular bicycle? … (more)

I can’t believe this is really an issue, though I predicted it would be. Where do you draw the line and why bother to, between a bicycle, e-bike, motor scooter, motor cycle, and and all the other single person slower vehicles people can dream up to get around on?

SF Critical Mass event expected to be large

By Carolyn Tyler: KTVU – excerpt

SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) — On Friday, Sept. 28, the Critical Mass bike ride will fill San Francisco streets and possibly create a big mess of the Friday evening commute. The bicyclists will gather at Justin Herman Plaza along the Embarcadero and they’ll ride from there. However, this time it is not the typical ride — it is the 20th anniversary of the event.
San Francisco Police Chief Greg Suhr said he was told to expect 10,000 cyclists or maybe even more. Those that take part in Critical Mass say they are fighting a car-centered society — one calls it a culture war…
And San Francisco has added miles of new bike lanes, but Rob Anderson is trying to stop any more from coming in. He’s taking the city’s bike plan to court.
“One of the problems with the bike plan is that it takes away traffic lanes and street parking on busy city streets. That creates a problem, that’s an environmental impact,” said Anderson…
“We will, we’ll have extra people with them. We’ll use our motorcycles, both dirt bikes and big bikes and actually officers on bicycles themselves,” said Suhr… (more)

Motorcycles riding with Bikes?

Scoot Bringing Zipcar-like Electric Scooters to San Francisco

By , Autopia: Road to the Future: for Wired.com

Snagging a cab in San Francisco is hard enough and renting a car for a quick blast across town seems like overkill — not to mention finding parking when you arrive. Scoot Networks wants to provide an alternative in the form of pay-as-you-go scooters. And even better, their fleet of two-wheelers are all electric.

Funded by sustainable start-up incubator Greenstart and originally shown at the San Francisco Launch conference, Scoot Networks is the brainchild of founder and CEO Michael Keating, who’s put the program into alpha testing last month with a small fleet of 10 electric scooters.

(more)

SF’s New Scooter Sharing Service Might Run Into Wall At DMV

(more at sfappeal)