Wiener Moves to Make NACTO Street Design Guides Official Policy for SF

by : sf.streetsblog – excerpt

Supervisor Scott Wiener has introduced a bill that would make the National Association of City Transportation Officials’ guides for Urban Streets and Urban Bikeways official city policy. The SFMTA Board of Directors already adopted the NACTO guides in January, but Wiener’s legislation would establish them as official guidelines for other agencies to use, including the Department of Public Works, the Planning Department, and the SF Fire Department… (more)

We have Phil Ting’s AB 1193 to thank for this headache, and the lobbies hired by the SFMTA and the Bicycle Coalition who wrote and sold it to the state legislature.

Send inquires to the other city agencies that this legislation seeks to control, such as the Fire Department and other emergency responders. Find out how concerned they are about the narrow streets and other obstructions SFMTA is planning to fund with the Prop A Bond funds.

Let SF City officials know who you blame for gridlock and ask the state assembly candidates who they plan to support when they get to Sacramento.

 

Mayor Vows to Punish Supes Who Backed Wiener’s Transit Funding Measure

By Aaron Bialick : sfstreets – excerpt

Mayor Ed Lee, who has cut into transportation funding by nixing Sunday parking meters and abandoning a proposed vehicle license fee increase, now says that he will punish the six supervisors who voted to approve a ballot measure to increase transportation’s share of the general fund. Supervisor Scott Wiener proposed the charter amendment as a stop-gap measure to fund the city’s transportation needs, while SF waits two years for the mayor to support a vehicle license fee measure…

The SF Chronicle reported on Sunday that ”the mayor’s office seems to be hinting that it will target programs important to the six supervisors who voted to place Wiener’s proposal on the ballot — Wiener, David Chiu, Jane Kim, London Breed, Malia Cohen and David Campos.”…. (more)

S.F. supervisor, fire chief clash over street widths

by Marisa Lagos, John Coté : sfgate – excerpt

San Francisco Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White is not a fan of Supervisor Scott Wiener‘s plan to limit the width of streets through a new city law that would require city agencies to request permission from the Board of Supervisors to go beyond guidelines.

Wiener and the Fire Department have been at loggerheads for years over fire officials’ reticence to support pedestrian-friendly improvements such as narrower streets and corner bulb-outs, a situation that has boiled over as the city nails down street engineering plans for the new Candlestick and Hunters Point developments.

On Tuesday, Wiener said he was fed up by the department’s insistence that streets in those new developments be 26 feet wide and announced the new legislation. He also asked the board’s budget and legislative analyst to examine whether the Fire Department could use smaller trucks citywide.

Hayes-White said she never agreed to narrower streets, as Wiener charged Tuesday, and that she’s not the only one pushing for the wider roadways: City engineers and experts at the Department of Public Works agree…

It’s not just about getting fire trucks down streets, or navigating corners, she said: It’s also about how the department configures its rigs when they are actually fighting fires. On a 20-foot-wide street, Hayes-White contended, firefighters couldn’t squeeze another truck past if an aerial ladder is there.

Besides, she said, 26 feet is the standard under both state and international fire code… (more)

Now here is your chance to tell the Mayor what your spending priorities are…

Lee is holding an “online budget town hall” meeting Thursday to get public input as the city prepares its next two-year budget in advance of the fiscal year ending June 30.

Sure, San Francisco’s economic recovery is the envy of mayors around the country, but even with tax revenue surging, the city still has real problems to address… (more)

The SF Fire Department is responsible for saving lives and property and nothing else. Who is qualified to tell them how to do that? We put our lives in their hands each time they are called. Slowing down traffic and creating traffic gridlock is adding to their response time and if they don’t object they may be held liable for not doing their jobs. If you feel the SFMTA has done a lousy job of fixing the traffic congestion and parking problems they claim to be working on, join us and let the city officials know you support a Charter Amendment to Fix the MTA: http://fixthemta.org/

RELATED:
Supervisor Wiener requests hearing to study need to widen streets
Fire chief says narrow streets requested by supervisor could harm public safety

Scott Wiener Proposes Measures to Curb SFFD’s Push for Wider Streets

by : sf.streetsblog – excerpt

The San Francisco Fire Department has not let up in its fight against narrower roads in the city, protesting measures like bulb-outs and traffic lane removals that make streets safer. In one of the latest instances, SFFD has fought 20-foot-wide streets planned for two major redevelopments, going against years of planning and established city codes. The department wants all new streets to be at least 26 feet wide.

Supervisor Scott Wiener today proposed measures to take on SFFD’s irrational stance. ”Elected policymakers and the voters have repeatedly adopted a policy of safer streets through effective street design, yet some of our departments are acting as if those directives didn’t exist,” he said in a statement.

Wiener’s proposed legislation would require city departments to get Board of Supervisors approval if they want to “deviate” from street width standards in the Fire, Public Works, and Administrative Codes, and the Better Streets Plan. The proposal also asks the City Attorney to draft amendments to those codes to “clarify” the existing standards… (more)

Fighting the Fire Department has got to be a new low. I just watched a fire truck traversing slowly down Alabama Street today weaving slowly between the cars and trucks down past 19th Street,

The real scary plan in the TEP is to cut off more traffic from streets along Potrero  that lead to General Hospital, while building wide sidewalks, bike lanes and bulbouts, and planting trees down the center of the street. None of the streets go directly through to the hospital now, so the pace is  already slow. What is going to happen during a major disaster when the traffic can’t move on and off the freeway and the emergency vehicles can’t get through to the hospital?