Call ‘shared economy’ what it is: business deal

Willie Brown : sfchronicle – excerpt

I don’t know about you, but I have had it with the “shared economy.”

The last time I looked in Webster’s dictionary, “shared” was defined as “to have or use (something) with others, to divide (something) into parts and each take or use a part.”

So in other words, a “ride share” is two or more people going from point A to point B, with both helping to pay for the ride. Like you “share” the cost of gas.

Here’s another word out of Webster’s: “paid,” as in, “being or having been paid” for a product or service.

That is what you do when you get into one of these cars. You pay. Sometimes you pay a lot. Sometimes, a heck of a lot if there is a convention or other big event in town.

It’s the same with house or apartment “sharing.” These are paid transactions. Straight up “What’s the price?” business transactions.

The only real “share” in the deal goes to the tech company that acts as the broker…

Many cities are saying “no” to the shared economy. If San Francisco doesn’t figure it out, the next dot bubble burst will probably kill some of them off.

In San Francisco, tech investor leads a political makeover

By Gerry Shih : reuters.com – excerpt

…””The tech industry is producing all the jobs in this city,” Conway snapped, according to four people present, his voice rising as he insisted that old-line businesses “need to get on board (by changing the tax code to favor the new technologies).”
In the end, they did get on board — and San Francisco voters on November 6 will decide whether to approve the change in the tax code…
Not everyone in this famously liberal city is enthused about the new tech boom, which is driving up rents and threatening to price out all but the wealthy.
“As someone who lived through the tech boom in the ’90s and watched countless friends and community members get pushed out of their homes, only for the bubble to disintegrate, this is painful to watch,” said Gabriel Haaland, political director for the SEIU Local 1021, the largest union in the city. “Those times are here again.”
Last month, when San Francisco Magazine published an article bemoaning tech-driven gentrification, traffic on the magazine’s website broke all records.
“It touched on an issue that people have been thinking about for a while,” said Jon Steinberg, the magazine’s editor…
In one instance this year, after social media company Pinterest moved to San Francisco, Conway pressed officials to repaint curbs to allow employee parking near the start-up’s offices, according to two people with knowledge of the matter. The city refused; Conway denied that the incident occurred… (more)