30 Stockton Muni station changes changed again

By John Zipperer : marinatimes – excerpt

A change of station stops by the 30 Stockton bus appears to be short-lived, following rider reaction. Several folks complained that Muni failed to respond to their complaints, but apparently those complaints were still heard loud and clear.

The controversy involves the switch of a stop from Divisadero and Chestnut Street to Fillmore and Chestnut Streets. What should have been a simple switch of locations caused trouble for riders who missed connections, were forced to exit the bus in the street because there wasn’t room for the bus to pull up to the curb, and other inconveniences.

The complaints came flooding in; the Marina Times received numerous calls and letters from people upset with the changes. Resident Janet Maslow pointed out that when the driver stops to take a 15-minute break, passengers have to disembark and wait for the next 30 bus. “Sometimes there is a bus waiting and sometimes not. If one is waiting and you get on it you usually have a few minutes’ wait because he is still on break. I don’t have the patience to wait, and I usually walk the rest of the way [home], which is OK during the day but late at night not OK. When I am almost home, a 30 drives past, very often empty because most people don’t wait,” she noted. “I understand that this is a pilot project, but it sucks; even the bus drivers detest it.”… (more)

SF public transit plans for route changes, new service

by : sfexaminer – excerpt

Muni is slow and unreliable, even by its own admission, and the road to modernizing it has been long and arduous. But today, that could take a turn for the better.

Transit officials this morning are expected to vote on a plan that will ignite the first major service overhaul for San Francisco’s public-transit system in more than 30 years.

The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency board of directors will consider authorizing planned system changes that are part of the Transit Effectiveness Project, including Muni frequency increases and decreases, new routes, realigning routes, eliminating routes, and expanding limited stop service and hours of operation… (more)

A CEQA appeal was filed yesterday to stop the TEP. Does anyone trust the SFMTA to fix the Muni, balance the budget, reduce traffic congestion, make parking easier, or make the trains run on time? If you are one of the millions of frustrated taxpayers who wonder what happens to the public funds SFMTA sucks up and begs for more, you might want to join the efforts to reform the MTA. They are growing in number, but here is one option: Stop SFMTA: http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/stop-sfmt…
Be sure to write your grievances in the comments as those go directly to the city authorities.
If you are a Muni rider who disagrees with the TEP, write the supervisors and tell them to deny funding:
http://discoveryink.wordpress.com/letters-…

Friday: SFMTA Board Considers Final Proposals for Muni TEP Service Changes

by : sf.streetsblog – excerpt

Service changes to 15 Muni lines are headed to the SFMTA Board of Directors for approval on Friday as part of the Transit Effectiveness Project. The proposals were revised through input at community meetings and approved by the board’s Policy and Governance Committee (PAG) last Friday. Many were fine-tuned largely to appease complaints from riders who would have to walk, at most, a few more blocks for more streamlined routes…

If you can’t make the City Hall board meeting on Friday at 8 a.m., you can weigh in on the proposals by emailing the SFMTA Board secretary at Roberta.Boomer@sfmta.com. Here’s the list of proposed line changes from an SFMTA email: …

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Special SFMTA TEP Meeting at City Hall to review current plans

Tomorrow (Friday, March 14, 2014) there will be a special meeting of the SFMTA Board.  The meeting will be in Room 400 City Hall, beginning at 9:00 a.m.  Meeting Agenda

Item 9 (which follows the Director’s and CAC reports) is for general public comment on MTA matters.

Item 12 will be a status report on the ever-changing Transit Effectiveness Project.  Good opportunity for those with TEP ideas to impart….

Item 13 (the main event) will be a presentation and discussion of the MTA’s FY 2015/16 Operating Budget followed by a discussion of its FY 2015/16 Capital Budget.

Muni’s capital budget problems have been compounded by the failure of Mayor Lee and his transportation task force (TTF) to adequately address Muni’s long range problems. For those who don’t have hours to spend waiting, Item 9 would give you an opportunity to speak relatively early in the meeting.

Please come and speak up.
Jerry Cauthen, for SaveMuni

Irving Transit Bulb-Outs Downsized to Appease SFFD, Parking Complainers

by : sfstreetsblog – excerpt

Sidewalk widenings on Irving Street in the Inner Sunset, proposed by the SFMTA to make it safer and easier for tens of thousands of commuters to board the N-Judah, have been cut down in size to a fraction of the original proposals due to neighborhood complaints about losing car parking and protests from the SF Fire Department.

The plans are scheduled for preliminary approval at an SFMTA engineering on Friday at 10 a.m. The SFMwTA Board of Directors must approve the plans at a later meeting… (more)

Who said the SFMTA is not listening? Keep those letters and comments coming to the SFMTA, Supervisors and media. Your voices are being heard as evidenced by the changes to the TEP so far. If you think the SFMTA is doing a lousy job of managing traffic and parking, let everyone know.

 

TEP Service Change Proposals Revised based on Community Feedback

Muni is considering proposed service and route changes as a part of the Transit Effectiveness Project (TEP).  Developed with extensive analysis and community input, the TEP proposals will modernize Muni for its 700,000 daily passengers.

Over the past six weeks, we have conducted extensive outeach and held numerous community meetings about the various TEP service change proposals.  Based on the feedback we received, we have revised the service change proposals for the following routes:

Also due to community input and further analysis, we will not be pursuing any route changes for the following routes at this time:

To provide input or learn more, attend a community meeting.  Visit tellmuni.com to give feedback and sign up for updates.  In March, the SFMTA Board will hold a public hearing on the proposed service changes and all community input received.

For more information about upcoming meetings, take a look at the Muni Needs Your Input flyer.

Upcoming Meetings
Click on route numbers below to see details about the proposed changes that will be discussed at each meeting.
St. Gregory’s of Nyssa Episcopal Church, 500 De Haro Street
Routes: 10, 22, 33
City Hall, Room 400
SFMTA Board Special Meeting – Informational Hearing
(Decision will not be made at this hearing.)
City Hall, Room 400
SFMTA Board Special Meeting – TEP Service Change Recommendations
(Decision expected at this meeting.)

For more information, check back on this page, call 415-701-4599, or email tep@sfmta.com.  Information on all proposed service changes will be available at all meetings and can be viewed at the Main Library reference desk.

Contact: Sean Kennedy, TEP Planning Manager, (415) 701-4599, email tep@sfmta.com

Facing Resistance to Longer Walks, SFMTA Revises Some Muni Route Changes

by : sf.streetsblog – excerpt

The SFMTA is fine-tuning its proposals to change Muni routes as part of its Transit Effectiveness Project, an effort to make Muni more efficient. By consolidating stops and concentrating service on key routes, the TEP aims to make Muni faster and more reliable. The agency presented revisions at a public meeting last night intended to address pushback from some residents, many of whom are elderly, against proposals that would have them walk up to a few blocks more to their Muni stop…

With input collected at 11 neighborhood meetings held throughout the city over the past few weeks, a few of the proposed line adjustments have undergone major revisions to avoid disrupting current service patterns, said Sean Kennedy, planning manager for the Muni TEP. “There are a couple of hot issues in each district,” he said.

For example, a proposal to move the 27-Bryant segment in the Mission to Folsom Street [PDF], replacing the 12-Folsom (proposed to be eliminated) and re-named the 27-Folsom, has been changed to keep Muni on Bryant(more)

Maybe SFMTA should spend more time on Muni and less altering the streets. If the planners took the Muni routes they are altering, they would know better than to suggest some of the things they are coming up with.

It looks as if SFMTA agreed to keep the 3 Jackson and the 27 Bryant, thanks in large part to Supervisors Farrell and Campos.  The northern end of the 8X-Bayshore was also re-configured. A list of the routes that people are opposed to changing: http://discoveryink.wordpress.com/tep-meetings/tep-routes/

If you have comments or concerns, you may want to attend one of the TEP Meetings or SFMTA Board meetings.

RELATED:
SFMTA Board Considers New Muni Fare Discounts

Muni riders object to TEP service cuts. Drop the TEP!

TEP-flyer download printable  TEP flyer

TEP Route Data and Proposed Changes: http://www.sfmta.com/node/97906
A number of Supervisors have heard the message and are supporting the riders. Let your Supervisor know how you feel about spending money on TEP: Contacts here:
http://discoveryink.wordpress.com/letters-and-comments/san-francisco-officials/

A Twitter Data Scientist Hacks San Francisco’s Subway Fares

By Sydney Brownstone : fastcoexist – excerpt

Why pay the full price to your destination on BART, when swapping tickets with a stranger mid-ride would save you both money? Perhaps because it sort of violates the social contract?
When New Yorkers move to the Bay Area, they’re often accused of personality crimes. Being haughty, cagey, and ragey-for-no-reason are just a few. I know this because I was one of them, and when I lived in Berkeley, there was one experience that drew out all of the stereotypes I had in me: Riding on Bay Area Rapid Transit, or BART.
Twitter data scientist Asif Haque has had his BART frustrations, too. Thus, he decided to take a data-driven approach to see if its fares were “fair” or not. In the process, he also devised a system to help riders artificially lower the cost of riding on public transportation by switching cards with fellow passengers in mid-ride.
For those unfamiliar, BART’s swiping and pricing system works like this: A passenger puts money on a paper ticket or plastic Clipper card, swipes through a turnstile at the origin stop, then swipes through another turnstile at the destination. How much you’re charged depends on where you eventually exit, and not necessarily how many stops you travel. (It’s a mileage-based formula, plus certain taxes here and there.) Unlike New York City’s subway system, BART does not charge a flat rate ($2.50) no matter where, or how far, you’re going. It also doesn’t offer weekly or monthly discounts for people who rely on it to get to work.
There’s a lot of math involved, but Haque, a game theorist and computer scientist by training, figured out that some people who switch their tickets or Clipper cards with each other mid-route could cheat BART’s fare calculator. In fact, a public ride-sharing scheme could work for some 13% of BART route pairs. For example, one rider traveling from Millbrae, in south San Francisco, to Embarcadero, in the heart of the city, pays $4.50 for the trip. Someone coming from the opposite same direction, Glen Park, and traveling to Berkeley, pays $4.20. If they switch passes mid-route, Traveler A ends up paying $5.10 (Millbrae to Berkeley) and Traveler B pays $1.20 (Glen Park to Embarcadero), together saving $1.70…

That’s one theoretical conclusion. The other outcome is deeply troubling. In 2013, after fares and parking fees, a little more than 38% of BART’s budget was funded by taxes. If the fare slice of the revenue pie decreases, taxes might end up making up the difference. That’s not decreasing the price of a ride, but simply shifting the cost onto the rest of the tax-paying public. To suggest that private companies jump in and make a profit off of potentially starving a public transportation system is a nightmare scenario–one that could create a massive gulf between functional private systems and crumbling public ones.
But Haque’s paper doesn’t really look at worst case scenarios. Instead, it’s purely focused on mathematical price efficiency. He says that he could apply this same analysis to any city’s public transportation, where efficiency is measured not by how expensive a ride is, or how profitable the transit authority might be, but whether pricing is set up in a way that makes it preferable to cheat. “For systems in which nothing is gained or lost by switching, those are efficient,” he says, citing Caltrain as one such example.
Haque suggests that if this inefficiency is brought to the attention of transit authorities, the less opportunity there would be to exploit it. He tweeted his research at BART to see how the transportation system might respond to the notion of changing its fare structure, but has yet to receive a response.
In the meantime, the likelihood of having private companies scale up Haque’s idea is nearly impossible. Crowds relying on paper and plastic ticket swapping is surely more physical trouble than it’s worth… (more)

This brings up the subject of how much all public transit truly costs relative to the fares charged for the tickets. The taxpaying public pays over half the Muni charges on the fares that pay. They pay 100% for all the free rides the city authorizes.

We take no sides on this issue, but, before you vote to approve more Muni bonds and approve initiatives to charge higher fines, fees, and taxes to support Muni services, find out where the money is spent now. Find out what percent of the MTA budget covers the actual operations and maintenance costs, and where the bulk of the funds go.

Ask the SFMTA, Mayor and supervisors how much SFMTA has spent on TEP plans to reorganize bus routes and cut Muni service. When you attend one of the many TEP meetings ask the MTA staff why the fifty new buses they just purchased can’t be used to increase service? Be sure to comment on the TEP in your neighborhood.

Transportation board to vote on funding for Muni Transit Effectiveness Project

by : sfexaminer – excerpt

A project aimed at increasing Muni’s reliability, reducing travel times, limiting overcrowding and enhancing vehicle and pedestrian safety could receive a big funding boost that would help it move through the environmental review process.

San Francisco County Transportation Authority board members on Tuesday will consider allocating $13.1 million in Proposition K funds to the proposed Transit Effectiveness Project for its preliminary engineering and detailed design.

Such work is required for up to 17 specific portions of the project, which include boarding island additions, traffic lane changes and route alignments.

The request seeks money from the Proposition K bus rapid transit and Muni metro network category, which provides funds for programs to create an integrated citywide network of reliable bus and light rail transit services, according to a staff report

“There are sufficient funds in the Capital Expenditures line item of the Transportation Authority’s approved Fiscal Year 2013/14 budget to cover the proposed action,” the report states… (more)

This is one of the most highly contested programs Muni has rolled out. TEP has angered more Muni riders than almost anything the SFMTA has done lately. Not that much has made them happy. This is Muni’s plan to move the vehicles around, cutting lines and leaving some neighborhoods with less transit, while doubling up service in others. If you object, get your written objections in soon.