Police captain against Bike Yield Law

By  : sfexaminer – excerpt

The man who started the “bike crackdown,” ramping up ticketing of cyclists rolling slowly through stop signs or blowing red lights, has now come out publicly against the proposed Bike Yield Law.

San Francisco Police Department Captain John Sanford, who heads Park Station near the Panhandle, torched the new law in his newest Park Station Newsletter.

“Being such a dense city, with so many visitors and distracted drivers, I will never be convinced it is safe to disobey any of the traffic laws, especially stop signs and red lights,” Sanford wrote in the newsletter.

The Bike Yield Law was proposed by Supervisor John Avalos, and was passed on first reading at the Board of Supervisors without a veto-proof majority. It will be voted on a second and final time Jan. 12. Mayor Ed Lee vowed to veto it.

The law would task the SFPD with deprioritizing enforcement of cyclists who safely yield at stop signs, and come to a full stop if they see autos or pedestrians. If neither are present, cyclists may roll through the intersection without stopping…

The man who started the “bike crackdown,” ramping up ticketing of cyclists rolling slowly through stop signs or blowing red lights, has now come out publicly against the proposed Bike Yield Law.

San Francisco Police Department Captain John Sanford, who heads Park Station near the Panhandle, torched the new law in his newest Park Station Newsletter.

“Being such a dense city, with so many visitors and distracted drivers, I will never be convinced it is safe to disobey any of the traffic laws, especially stop signs and red lights,” Sanford wrote in the newsletter.

The Bike Yield Law was proposed by Supervisor John Avalos, and was passed on first reading at the Board of Supervisors without a veto-proof majority. It will be voted on a second and final time Jan. 12. Mayor Ed Lee vowed to veto it.

The law would task the SFPD with deprioritizing enforcement of cyclists who safely yield at stop signs, and come to a full stop if they see autos or pedestrians. If neither are present, cyclists may roll through the intersection without stopping… (more)

Maybe the recent media coverage about the strong police presence around the wiggle is causing cyclists to drive more carefully through those intersections, making them safer.

The SFMTA Renames Lower Haight as “The Wiggle Community” – Calls for SFPD Crackdown on Bikes, Return of Hated Traffic Circles

sfcitizen – excerpt

“I lived on Scott Street, between Oak & Fell during the last traffic circle experiment. Was nearly hit four or five times walking to Haight Street for coffee. That is a very residential neighborhood, one reason it is good to bike through. But also, a bunch of pedestrians should not have risk life and limb to cross the street…”

Indeed, Jimbo! Pedestrians wanting to cross Page would hear a car coming from a half-block away. What should they do? Would the drivers slow down? The peds wouldn’t know. Very bad!  All this so that Page could eventually become a “Bicycle Boulevard?” All this so that cyclists wouldn’t have to worry about getting tickets for California stopping? Ridiculoso!]… (more)