Uber, Lyft main reason for increased traffic congestion in SF, study finds

by Teresa Hammerl : hoodline – excerpt (includes map)

Ride-hailing services such as Uber and Lyft accounted for approximately 50 percent of the rise in vehicle congestion in the city between 2010 and 2016, according to a report released by the San Francisco County Transportation Authority (SFCTA) earlier today.

The study’s indicators for congestion are vehicle hours of delay, vehicle miles traveled, as well as average speeds. “Understanding the factors of congestion is key to our ability to address the problem effectively and maintain the accessibility of our downtown core,” said SFCTA executive director Tilly Chang in a statement… (more)

The map shows an abundance of Uber/Lyfts in the downtown area where congestion is the worst. Is this a coincidence or evidence that ride hails are congesting the area?

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Poll finds possible measures to fund SF transit lack two-thirds support

By Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez : sfexaminer – excerpt

A new survey found a majority of San Francisco voters enthusiastic to approve new funding measures for transportation — but those measures may lack the two-thirds voter support needed to pass…

The results of the survey will be presented to the transportation authority Board of Directors, which is comprised of the Board of Supervisors, on Jan. 9… (more)

CITIZENS REVOLT. The lack of trust in the SFMTA is growing and probably accounts for the lack of public support for more transit funds. Maybe the City Hall should consider passing a SFMTA Charter amendment, changing SFMTA management, fixing the gridlock, reversing the traffic lane diet, giving the public back their streets and parking and returning the bus stops and seats to the Muni riders, before asking for more money. By then they might have opened the Central Subway, and finished some of the many projects that are hanging people up now and may be blamed for the debts the department is accruing. Hint: Stop all new street project starts until the current ones are done and paid for!

Congressman denounces Bay Area toll hike for transit

By Matier & Ross : sfchronicle – excerpt

Night-Bridge

Twilight on the Bay Bridge photo by zrants

East Bay Rep. Mark DeSaulnier has been back home and getting an earful about the situation in Washington — but it was the proposed ballot measure to raise tolls on the state’s Bay Area bridges to help fund transit projects that got his blood boiling…

The measure — which would raise tolls by $2 to $3 — is being put together by a collection of Bay Area legislators. It’s expected to generate about $125 million for a slew of road and mass transit improvements throughout the nine-county region…

DeSaulnier is not alone. State Sen. Steve Glazer, D-Orinda, is raising questions about how the money would be spent, as is Assemblywoman Catharine Baker, R-San Ramon.

Other East Bay officials, whose constituents would pay the bulk of the toll increase, have said they’ll support the measure only if more projects are added to the goody list in Alameda and Contra Costa counties…(more)

Why not move the jobs to the housing? Would that not be a cheaper less painful solution for the folks living in the suburbs? With so many creative ideas coming out of Sacramento you would think they could figure that one out. Why not just spread the wealth and political power? Cut their commutes and commute traffic around the coast cities at the same time. After the floods in the Gulf coast you might want to think twice about building huge cities at sea level.

Potrero Avenue Roadway Improvement Project

Just when you thought they couldn’t make your life any worse, SFMTA and the city of San Francisco, outdo themselves once again. They spend a fortune of your money to make you miserable.

Hello,

I wanted to touch base with you regarding the Potrero Avenue Roadway Improvement Project. The project is a multi-agency (Public Works, SFMTA, and PUC) effort to improve safety and upgrade infrastructure along Potrero Ave. and neighboring blocks. The scope of work will include sewer main replacement, water main installation, curb ramps, bulb-outs, bus-ramps, some sidewalk widening, center-islands, bus pads, street lighting upgrades, tree planting, Muni OCS work, street base repairs, etc. Work is scheduled to begin this month with overall completion expected in Spring 2018.

This project is led by Public Works and I’ll be your point of contact during construction. Please pass along this notice to members and anyone else you think might be interested in the project. Additional information on the project can be found by visiting our webpage at www.sfdpw.org/potrero

Thank you.

Alex M.

Public Affairs Officer

Murillo, Alex (DPW)” <Alex.M.Murillo>

http://sfdpw.org/index.aspx?page=1673

Project Update

Public Works has contracted A. Ruiz Construction, Inc. to complete work on the Potrero Avenue Roadway Improvement Project. Our contractor is expected to begin water main installation work on Potrero Avenue the week of December 7, 2015. However, in advance of the water main work, you may see crews “potholing” on Potrero and other neighboring streets. Potholing is the practice of digging an exploratory hole to expose underground utilities to ascertain the horizontal and vertical location of the facility.

Project Background

The project is a collaboration between neighbors and several city agencies (Public Works, SFMTA, and PUC) to improve safety for people walking and biking, maximize infrastructure upgrades in the area, and to help beautify Potrero Avenue.

All of the upgrades are being constructed to coincide with the completion of the SF General Hospital Rebuild. The Potrero Avenue Roadway Improvement Project is scheduled to begin construction in December 2015 with completion planned in Spring 2018.

The final design for roadway improvements is the result of five community workshops, valuable public input, and the neighborhood voting for their preferred option for transforming Potrero Avenue. Option 1 emerged as the preferred design alternative for Potrero Avenue.

The Potrero Avenue Roadway Improvement Project will also bring a revitalizing facelift to the public space adjacent to the SF General Hospital with pedestrian safety improvements, wider sidewalks, new landscaping and new street lights.

Preferred Option Community Letter, Dec. 20, 2013

Final Potrero Streetscape Improvements Concept images

Scope of Work

Potrero Avenue, repaving Alameda Street to the 101 On-ramp (map) / The streetscape improvement work will happen on Potrero Ave. between 21st and 25th streets.
22nd Street, Hampshire Street to Vermont Street
23rd Street, Potrero Avenue to Vermont Street
Vermont Street: 22nd Street to 23rd Street
Hampshire Street: 24th Street to 25th Street / The work at this location will be limited to the Muni overhead wires and poles.

Schedule

SFMTA Traffic Engineering Public Hearing held February 14, 2014
SFMTA Board approved the project on March 28, 2014
Construction will begin in December 2015.
Completion in Spring 2018.

Cost/Funding

Construction Cost: $19.8 million. This project is funded through the 2011 Road Repaving and Street Safety Bond Program, Prop K Sales Tax Dollars, Federal Transit Authority, and the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission.

Contact

Alex M. Murillo Cristina C. Olea
Public Affairs Officer Project Manager
Alex.M.Murillo Cristina.C.Olea
(415) 558-5296

Community Meetings

Community Open House #4: Thursday, November 7, 2013

22 Fillmore update

Shortcuts By Steven J. Moss : potreroview – excerpt

Muni Moving
: San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency will not be altering the 22 Fillmore route, as previously reported in Short Cuts. However, Muni will launch a new bus line, the 55 16th Street, to provide connections along 16th Street between the 16th Street Bay Area Rapid Transit station and Mission Bay, in part to serve the new University of California, San Francisco Benioff Children’s Hospital. The new 55 line will serve all 22 Fillmore bus stops on 16th Street between Mission and Vermont streets, with additional stops on 16th Street at Rhode Island, Wisconsin, Missouri, and Fourth streets. The line will operate seven days a week from approximately 6 a.m. to midnight, with a 15 minute weekday daytime frequency… (more)

That is what they are saying. Latest plans were online but they appear to have disappeared. If you care about the details, go to the Open House Wednesday, January 14, 6-7:30 PM at Marshall Elementary School 1575 15th Street. If you Can’t make it  Take the project survey and voice your opinions.

 

RELATED:
Wednesday, January 14, 6-7:30 PM
22 Fillmore Marshall Elementary School 1575 15th Street, San Francisco
If you Can’t make it? Take our project survey! Join SFMTA to learn more, engage with SFMTA staff, ask questions, and share your thoughts! Your feedback is important as we work together to build a strong project for the community. This looks like just a presentation with no feedback. The feedback will have to be comments to the SFMTA Board prior to the next meeting on January 20, where they plan to approve the plan. Copy the Supervisors. (contact SF officials)

 

 

It’s official: Bay Area gridlock is worse

By Denis Cuff : mercury news – excerpt

OAKLAND — The Bay Area freeway commute is moving at its slowest pace in over a decade, as an economy that has shifted into overdrive leaves drivers idling on gridlocked roads.

In its first congestion report card in five years, the Bay Area’s transportation planning agency said that average congestion — defined as traffic moving 35 mph or less — increased 65 percent in the Bay Area from 2009 to 2013.

To address the growing problem, transportation leaders are calling for more carpool and toll lanes, improved public transit and more commuters shifting work times.

“It’s good news and bad news,” said Amy Worth, the Metropolitan Transportation Commission chairwoman and also an Orinda councilwoman. “The good news is more people are finding work; the bad news is it’s taking them longer to get there.”… (more)

No news here. There is a map of worst areas and some helpful suggestions on how to fix the problem, starting with shifting work hours to relive congestion during peak times.

Transportation Planners Consider Program To Keep Cars From Blocking San Francisco Intersections

By Jeffrey Schaub : cbslocal – excerpt

SAN FRANCISCO (KCBS) — The City of San Francisco is considering initiating a program called “Don’t Block the Box’” to get drivers to stop clogging up intersections as they leave during the afternoon commute or head to a Giants’ games.

It’s become epidemic on the city’s streets: Frustrated motorists sitting in the middle of an intersection blocking pedestrian crossings and stopping cross traffic.

The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency recently completed a six-day increased enforcement period, including tests on two South Of Market intersections. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m., 1,100 vehicles blocked the crosswalks and few nights later, parking control officers wrote up $100 tickets. According to the San Francisco Chronicle, the number of cars sitting in the intersection dropped significantly… (more)

If SFMTA really cared about clearing intersections they would do a better job of timing traffic signals.

Palo Alto inks $500K deal to loosen traffic gridlock, explores parking fixes

: bizjournals – excerpt

Try driving through Palo Alto during rush hour and you’re likely in for some quality time behind the wheel.

The wealthy Peninsula city known for its concentration of high-paying jobs is a poster child — along with other Silicon Valley office hubs like Mountain View and Sunnyvale — for the traffic gridlock that results from decades of unbalanced economic development.

Because Palo Alto has a very limited supply of homes priced under $1 million, tech workers, professional service providers, hospitality workers and Stanford academics alike commute into the city each day for work, leading to clogged streets and packed parking lots. As I have reported, the city had 3.1 jobs for every one housing unit as of 2012, U.S…

Recognizing that keeping commuters employers happy is a good thing for the city’s tax base, Palo Alto officials are working on multiple fronts to curb traffic woes and parking shortages fueled by the jobs-housing mismatch.

This month, the city approved a $499,880, three-year contract with Berkeley-based consulting firm Moore Lacofano Goltsman Inc. (MIG) to organize a downtown nonprofit Transportation Management Association, according to a report by Palo Alto Weekly. The city aims for the group to “coordinate incentives for downtown employees to switch from cars to other modes of transportation,” the paper adds.

“The city, employers and transit agencies have already promoted trip reduction and alternative options,” according to a memo on the need for the new downtown Transportation Management Association. “Yet, these initiatives are not comprehensive in nature and have not been effective from a district-wide standpoint.”…

Urban planning advocates throughout Silicon Valley are urging area cities to consider transit-oriented development and other means of reducing productivity-sapping traffic. But with disjointed public transit sometimes forcing commuters to switch between multiple systems — commuter rail, light rail, buses, bike sharing, etc. — the question is whether alternatives to driving are really practical(more)

At some point you have to questions the wisdom of continuing the same tactics when traffic is getting progressively worse. No tactics are in order. November elections will bring a fresh look at the driver backlash in many localities. A list of local election issues is coming soon. Stay tuned to metermadness.

Crisis in San Francisco – “There’s Only Parking, Everywhere”

Dearest District 5 – excerpt

There’s a real crisis in San Francisco and you see it every day.  There’s only parking, everywhere.  Look around and you’ll see people’s home/apartment garages, private garages, city owned parking garages, street parking and once and a while, metered parking.  While it may appear that there’s parking on virtually every street in San  Francisco and in every dwelling in upwards of a million spaces, the city desperately needs more.

While some will argue that parking is a net loss for a city, Dearest District 5 knows better than those fools, even if I don’t have any relevant degree or training in urban planning.  San Francisco’s 40% vehicle infrastructure simply isn’t enough!  And the disgustingly small amount of parking (1.5 square miles of San Francisco’s 7 square miles of land).  Parking, as everyone knows, is a renewable resource and needs to continue to grow in a city that is not expanding.

The SFMTA has been relentless in it’s assault on parking, and instead of installing MORE parking spaces, they try to manage supply and demands with metered parking!  Everyone knows it’s our god-given right to only pay for where we live, eat, purchase goods, be entertained, but NOT to park on the streets!  And even while prices increase on virtually everything in the city, an annual fee of 100 dollars for a parking permit seems like a sensible approach to mitigating a god given right to store a car in a city.

More More More!!! … (more)