Can Walnut Creek be a model for reducing gridlock? It hopes so

By Hannah Norman : bizjournals – excerpt

As Bay Area traffic congestion hovers at an all-time high, the East Bay suburb is taking matters into its own hands to limit single occupancy vehicles on the roads and becoming a model of smart transit among smaller cities… (more)

Editorial: Cars come first

editorial : calgaryherald – excerpt

City hall is badly in need of a priority reshuffle. The news that city crews were clearing snow from the cycle track downtown should raise the justified ire of every commuter who has spent an excruciating number of hours inching their way to work and back home again on slippery, snowy streets.

Thousands of people needed to get to work, to doctor’s appointments, or to other places on Calgary’s dangerous roads; yet, the cycle track is listed as Priority 1 and is cleared before many streets, just so that a handful of winter cyclists can use it… (more)

Has the transit first movement gone mad? Who benefits? Do you suppose they have spare the air days in Calgary?

S.F. tries to vote its way out of chronic traffic jam

By Michael Cabanatuan : sfgate – excerpt

The question about transportation being posed to San Francisco voters this fall might be summed up this way: Do you want to get on the bus and be on your way, or do you want to stand there and keep waiting?

Transportation, always a topic of complaint or debate in San Francisco, stands front and center on the November ballot. Voters are being asked to decide on three propositions that test the city’s commitment to transit, how it should be funded and the direction of its transportation planning.

The trio of propositions consists of a $500 million bond measure, a plan to increase the Muni budget to keep pace with population growth, and an advisory measure that would ask decision-makers to freeze parking rates and make cars and driving a higher priority…

David Looman, who led the drive to put Prop. L on the ballot, says it’s “simply a way for people to have their voices heard that city policies on parking and traffic are out of control.”

Officials at the MTA and City Hall may wish for a world in which everyone bikes, walks or rides Muni, he said, but 79 percent of residents still own cars and should be accommodated…

“This is a very transportation-heavy election cycle,” Jawa said. “The sense that we need to start doing things differently in transportation is alive and well in San Francisco.”… (morei)

 

Good MTA Director v. Bad MTA Director

by Alison Stevens Rodrigues : beyondchron – excerpt (first posted Aug. 17‚ 2005, re-posted Friday, Sept. 13, 2013)

At yesterday’s Municipal Transportation Agency (MTA) Board of Directors meeting, members of the public were reminded of what they did not want from a new transportation director even before they were allowed to discuss what they did.
Before that, however, they were reminded of the San Francisco Municipal Railway’s (MUNI) current state of affairs. As a MUNI representative read results from the system’s quarterly report, it became clear that MUNI’s performance falls short of standards outlined in Proposition E. The lack of operators and number of missed runs are two of MUNI’s bad pennies… (more)

Remembering how we got here. How well did the process work the last time? Might people have different ideas now?