Supes Vote Next Week on Wiener’s Backup Transportation Funding Measure

by : sfstreetsblog – excerpt

Supervisors are expected to vote next week on Supervisor Scott Wiener’s backup plan for transportation funding — a charter amendment that, with voter approval, would increase the share of the city’s general fund that gets allocated to Muni, pedestrian safety, and bike infrastructure. That share would be tied to the city’s growing population.

Wiener introduced the measure as a safeguard that would increase transportation funding even if Mayor Ed Lee dropped his plan to put a vehicle license fee increase on the ballot. Lee subsequently did drop his support in June, at least until the 2016 election, so Wiener proposed his stop-gap measure. The legislation includes a provision that would allow the mayor to remove the charter amendment if the vehicle license fee increase is passed in 2016, according to Wiener… (more)

Transportation funding faces key test after Mayor Lee flips on VLF increase

By   : sfbg – excerpt

Facing a deadline of tomorrow’s [Tues/10] San Francisco Board of Supervisors meeting to introduce measures for the November ballot, advocates for addressing the city’s massive long-term transportation funding gap still hope to introduce an increase in the local vehicle license fee, even though the once-supportive Mayor Ed Lee has gotten cold feet.

While Lee and all 11 of the supervisors support a $500 million general obligation bond that would mostly go toward capital improvements for Muni — a measure almost certain to be approved by its July 22 deadline — the local VLF was originally presented by Lee as a companion measure to fund Muni, street resurfacing, and bike and pedestrian safety improvements.

But when Lee got spooked by a poll in December showing 44 percent voter approval for increasing the VLF and the need to actually do some campaigning for the measure, he withdrew his support and left cycling, streets, and safety all severely underfunded. A report last year by the Mayor’s Transportation Task Force pegged the city’s transportation infrastructure needs at $10.1 billion over 15 years, recommending just $3 billion in new funding to meet that need, including the embattled VLF measure… (more)

Good riddance, Sunday parking meters

By Sean Havey : sfgate – excerpt

Some anticar ideas are too much, even for San Francisco, where policies limiting driving are a near-religion. After an unhappy tryout, the city will stop enforcing parking meters on Sunday. It’s the right end to an unpopular and unfair plan.

Drivers need a break from worrying about the time ticking down on curb slots. There needs to be a day of rest from swarms of meter-minders dispensing tickets that cost $60 or more. Turning Sunday into another cash-producing day irritates everyone, resident and visitor alike.

By canceling meter collections and ticket revenues, the city is giving up $11 million. (Not  according to this article)  But there are bigger targets to aim for. In signaling his opposition, Lee worried that the public’s annoyance with Sunday meters could doom plans in November for a $500 million transit bond and a vehicle license fee boost, designed to provide money for Muni, street improvements and other transit fixes.

These ballot measures may net a reliable and supportable stream of money for public transit, right now starved of dependable support. Even in financially flush times, the city’s mix of fares, fees, fines and general taxes is a patchwork system that’s partly to blame for Muni’s ills that make driving a go-to option.

But the answer shouldn’t be more hazing of vehicle owners in a crowded, expensive city. Drivers already pay into this city’s transit-first programs. Nailing them again undercuts the support the city needs to modernize its streets and transportation system… (more)

SFMTA claims they will not lose any money on the Sunday meters, because they will find other ways to ticket drivers. They treat drivers like their personal ATM machines and then beg for more money for vehicle license fees? Do they think we are fools?

Drivers pay. Muni riders pay. Guess who doesn’t pay.

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SF drivers not off the hook on Sundays