D, H, L, and M Props Supporters United

We are in it to win it!

4 for Reform – Vote Yes on DHL+M

D is for Democratic elections for open seats on the Board of Supervisors
H is for honest government to create a public advocate
L is for less gridlock to improve Muni and traffic
M is for more affordable housing

Prop. L would give SF supervisors more control over transit board

By Michael Cabanatuan : sfchronicle – excerpt

As the agency in charge of parking, traffic, taxis and Muni — basically everything in San Francisco that’s supposed to move people — the Municipal Transportation Agency is, quite naturally, a popular target of criticism.

Some critics say the MTA, as it’s often known, is trying to force everyone to get rid of their
cars, while others say the agency is too timid and too reluctant to radically improve
transportation in the city. They also say the mayor has way too much influence as the one
who appoints its Board of Directors.
Those critics have united behind Proposition L on the Nov. 8 ballot. The proposal, which
requires a simple majority vote to pass, seeks to give the Board of Supervisors more
authority over the seven-member board.
Although the mayor appoints its members, they are confirmed by the Board of Supervisors.
They serve four-year terms and have to leave after three terms. Prop. L would change the
appointment process so that four of the members would be appointed by the mayor and
three by the supervisors. The mayor’s appointees would still be subject to the supervisors’
confirmation.
The proposition would also give supervisors a slightly stronger hand in the agency’s
budget. The MTA board passes its own budget, which must be approved or rejected in its
entirety by the supervisors — unless they can muster seven votes to send it back for
revision. Prop. L would lower that requirement to six votes… (more)

Vote Yes on L and No on J and K.

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Chris Daly Breaks Up With Union, Pro-Car Measure Apparently Not To Blame [Updated]

sfist – excerpt

We don’t have Chris Daly to kick around anymore (again). The bombastic former city supervisor whom everybody loved to hate has severed his ties with San Francisco’s most-visible union, the purple-shirted army of Service Employees International Union Local 1021, for whom he had been working for the past three years…

The longtime friend-of-Daly SF Bay Guardian noted yesterday that Daly parted ways with the union at the same time as it endorsed Proposition L, which has backing from Republicans as well as tech maven Sean Parker. The measure would steer city transit funding towards motorists and make it tougher for the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency to stick parking meters wherever it damn pleases…

SFist: If you didn’t leave SEIU over Prop L issues (as you told Steve Jones) what was the reason behind your departure?

Daly: Even though I disagree with the decision 1021 made on Proposition L, it had no bearing on my departure. In fact, internal discussions about me leaving my post as Political Director started about 6 months ago — long before Prop L was even a glimmer in Sean Parker’s eye… (more)

Home Story Bad roads, congested commutes cost state drivers $44 billion a year, report says

California drivers pay a staggering $44 billion a year in extra car costs because of traffic jams that seemingly grow worse by the day, spreading potholes and outdated roads and bridges, according to a national highway advocacy group.

 Some Bay Area drivers fork over as much as $2,200 a year, according to a report released Thursday by The Road Information Program, or TRIP.
The latest report isn’t telling regional transportation officials anything they haven’t heard before, but it remains sobering…

Driving on deficient roads costs each San Francisco-Oakland-area driver $2,206 per year in the form of extra vehicle operating costs, according to the report. In the South Bay, it’s $1,723 a year per driver, and Los Angeles drivers have it the roughest, forking out $2,458 a year.

 The TRIP study found that 49 percent of major roads in the San Francisco-Oakland area are in poor condition and an additional 30 percent are mediocre, costing the average motorist an additional $795 each year in extra vehicle operating costs.
 That’s due to accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs and increased gas use and tire wear, said Carolyn Bonifas Kelly, a TRIP spokeswoman…
Traffic officials spread out across the state Thursday to spread the worrisome news and promote measures to raise funds for more pavement and public transit. Alameda County will seek a sales tax hike in the November election, and Santa Clara County is expected to do so in two years. A statewide measure to raise the vehicle license fee could also be on the 2016 ballot, and numerous cities, including San Francisco, are also considering an appeal to voters… Direct link to PDF of report:…  (more)
MTCfundingchart
According to this chart, the regional transit authority plans to demand more revenues from residents while proving less service. We are working on a list of ballot proposals that voters are facing in November.
So far in SF we have Props A and B that would expand the revenues of the SFMTA and the counter proposal, Prop L to change their priorities.
We favor No on A and B (No more money without accountability.) and Yes on L: Restore Transportation Balance.

 

More Workers Means The Worst Commute In Bay Area History

by Mike Sugerman : CBSlocal – excerpt

AN FRANCISCO (KCBS)— With more people working in the Bay Area than ever before, one of the biggest strains it’s having is the impact on traffic.

The commute to work and back seems to be getting worse every day and it’s not just on the freeways. KCBS’ Mike Sugerman started driving to work in 2011 after three decades of taking public transportation and he doesn’t like it.

It’s not just freeways either. The construction going on in San Francisco’s SoMa, where many of the people funneling into the city from the East and South Bay end up, is mucking up the works… (more)

Who do you blame for gridlock?
We blame the SFMTA. They put people in charge of traffic who hate cars and have vowed to make drivers miserable. It is up to the SF residents to vote against them by voting No on A and B (No more money without accountability) and Yes on L. Restore Transportation Balance. http://www.restorebalance14.org