Mountain View starts collecting waste from RV dwellers

by John Orr : mercurynews – excerpt

Complaints pouring in about sewage being dumped illegally on lawns, parks and storm drains.

The City of Mountain View in January began a pilot program to collect waste from recreational vehicles, in response to the increasing number of people who live in such vehicles in the city. The service is free, with vouchers distributed by the police department…

With more people living in recreational vehicles on Mountain View’s streets, the need for them to safely empty their wastewater tanks is becoming increasingly important…

In response to the growing problem, the City Council in March approved “the sanitary waste dump pilot RV waste disposal program,” said Kimberly S. Thomas of the city manager’s office. “The goal was to both offer waste disposal services to residents living in RVs, and test whether a permanent sanitary waste dump in Mountain View is viable.”

That program began in earnest on Jan. 16, when the first of two phases began in parking lot A/B at Shoreline Amphitheatre… (more)

RELATED:

“Parking Management and Vehicular Habitation” presentation at the February 6 Board meeting

Preview the SFMTA Oversize Vehicle SlideShow: Slide_presentation.pdf
Perhaps this is a good opportunity to consider a program for San Francisco like the one they are using in Mountain View to handle the problem if such a program does not yet exist.

 

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The worst neighborhoods for parking in San Francisco

By Mike Moffitt : SFGATE – excerpt  (includes map)

SF collects millions in parking fines every year

In San Francisco, parking regulation enforcement helps ensure that spaces are turned over, bus zones are not blocked, street sweepers can do their job and residential spaces are reserved for residents.

But they also have another purpose — making millions for the city.

Recently we wrote about a new app that pinpointed the 10 most parking ticket-prone blocks in San Francisco.

Now we’re looking at which neighborhoods hand out the most parking citations — and reap the most money… (more)

RELATED:

S.F.’s Worst Block for Parking Pain

By Michael Cabanatnuam and Steve Rubentstien : sfchronicle – excerpt (linked file)

More than 4,000 tickets issued last year on street riddled with confusing signs, changing rules South of Market. (download pdf)

“Parking, which is horrible everywhere in SF and is especially horrible on the 300 Block Townsend” between Fourth and Fifth Streets. This block, located next to the train station, has many conflicting signs regarding traffic and parking instructions.

Thank you Spot Angle for gathering and sharing the data on parking and traffic tickets in SF, and thank you SF Gate and SF Chronicle for conducting further research and reporting on this most irksome issue that plague our citizens.

The public is confused and outraged over many issues on our streets and tickets are responsible for a lot of that anger . Many tickets are issued unfairly and can be contested successfully if you have the time to go to at least two or three hearings.

Muni riders are not immune from erroneous tickets. Many riders complain about tickets issued because of false readings on scanners. This is one more reason people are getting off the bus.

So, what is City Hall going to do about it? They are conducting hearings on a lot of complaints related to street projects. Add this one to the list  We suggest a citizens’ review of all future signs be added to the public outreach of street projects to assure the signs at least make sense and are understood by some humans who know the neighborhood. Tickets given out where signs and rules conflict, should be disregarded as incentive to the department to fix the problem.

Find out if San Francisco owes you $$ for overpaid parking tickets; deadline soon

By Amy Graff : SFGATE – excerpt

Those who are used to owing the City of San Francisco money for unpaid parking tickets will like this news: SFMTA is offering people the opportunity to claim cash for their overpaid parking tickets.

The Municipal Transportation Agency has $600,000 in unclaimed funds from a couple of hundred people and businesses who either overpaid or double-paid parking and transit citations issued between Jan. 1, 1995, and June 30, 2014.

The agency will reimburse individuals who file claims by Dec. 14, 2017. After the deadline, unclaimed funds will become property of the city… (more)

We know that ticket complaints are high on the list of our readers. Unfortunately, we can only point to general remedies as each case needs special investigations. Here is your chance to handle one of the many issues regarding parking tickets. One wonders how so many people were convinced to pay twice.

What kind of glitch caused this and has that glitch has been fixed? One also wonders if any interest on the will be returned, since the SFMTA charges us additional costs for late payments one hopes they will return interests on mistaken overcharges.

How are tourists and visitors going to be reimbursed? Can’t the SFMTA just return the balance on credit cards without claims? They know who overpaid.

Book ’em Danno: The San Francisco neighborhoods with the most parking tickets

By : bizjournals – excerpt (includes map)

San Francisco holds the dubious distinction of the highest average ticket price on the country, with the city issuing $124 million annually in tickets, according to research from parking startup SpotAngels.

The company combined city data with their own parking data on spot location, regulation and average ticket price to analyze the neighborhoods and locations where cars receive the most tickets and why.

The neighborhoods with the most parking ticket revenue are led by SoMa with $11 million followed by the Inner Richmond and the Mission, with $10.5 million and $9.5 million, respectively… (more)

The number one complaint of drivers used to be tickets. I think that may have changed, but is still really high on the list of annoyances. We understand that many tickets that are contested are found to be lacking and are eventually dismissed. See some details on how to appeal tickets: https://metermadness.wordpress.com/tickets/

‘Meter Maid Monitor’ aims to help SF users avoid parking tickets

By Alyssa Pereira : sfgate – excerpt

A crafty new invention created by Castro resident John Naulty, which premiered at TechCrunch Disrupt this week, is aiming to subvert the authority of the ticket-writing parking officials in San Francisco.

Called “Meter Maid Monitor,” it tackles a common hassle of many local residents: the requirement to move one’s car every two hours in many San Francisco neighborhoods. The program utilizes Raspberry Pi and its Pi Camera module along with OpenCV, operating as a motion detector… (more)

Everyone complains about the high cost of parking tickets. Supervisor Kim wants to investigate how the cost analysis is done to determine cost recovery. Avoiding the tickets is the best solution.

RELATED:
Meter Maid Monitor fixes the most San Francisco problem ever

Patent for “Parking Meter with Contactless Payment” Awarded to MacKay Meters

By Marketwired : sys-con – excerpt

GLASGOW, NOVA SCOTIA — (Marketwired) — 08/15/16 — J.J. MacKay Canada Limited (MacKay Meters), a recognized world leader in the manufacturing and development of parking control products, continues to strengthen its Intellectual Property portfolio with the issuance of U.S. Patent Number 9,406,056 titled “Parking Meter with Contactless Payment”, on August 2, 2016.

This new US patent relates to parking meters and in particular, to parking meters having contactless payment options and follows closely behind two Canadian patents (CA 2,773,250 and CA 2,870,544) issued on June 28, 2016 that also relate to parking meters with contactless payment. The above noted patents represent just a small portion of MacKay’s extensive Patent/IP portfolio which includes utility patents, patent applications, design patents, and industrial design registrations, and trademarks filed in the USA, Canada and internationally… (more)

New SFFD vehicles designed to squeeze through narrow city streets

By sfexaminer -excerpt

The San Francisco Fire Department is expected to purchase eight custom fire engines next month that will be better suited for the narrow streets and changing traffic conditions that make firefighting a challenge in The City.

Bus stops in the middle of the street, street changes like bulb outs and the booming ride-hail industry have made it more difficult for fire trucks and engines to rush to emergencies in San Francisco, according to Assistant Deputy Chief Ken Lombardi.

News of the new engines comes just months after Mayor Ed Lee announced a two-year plan to invest $14.3 million into the department to replace its aging fleet, including 13 fire engines, four aerial trucks and eight ambulances.

Speaking to the Fire Commission on Wednesday, Lombardi said that double parking by delivery trucks and the estimated 37,000 Uber and Lyft drivers that navigate The City have created a “nightmarish” situation for firefighters on the streets of San Francisco.

“I don’t know if it’s ever been as bad as it is now,” Lombardi said. “It’s just absolutely crazy.”…

“As we densify our city and build up higher buildings to accommodate higher populations we’re going to need the wider streets,” Fire Commissioner Ken Cleaveland said at the meeting…

San Francisco’s fire vehicles tend to be larger than other cities because they are suited for motors that have enough horsepower to travel up steep hills, Lombardi said. Fire engines also have to carry 500 gallons of water since the department has to combat fast-spreading fires…

Lombardi pointed to planned changes to Hermann Street — near its intersection with Laguna Street — that would turn parking spaces from running parallel to the street to sitting at a 45-degree angle to increase the number of spaces available.

The fire department is working with The City’s transit agency to correct the proposed plan, which Lombardi said violates fire codes that prohibit narrowing streets to smaller than 20-feet wide. Under the plan, parts of Hermann Street would be 18-feet wide.

Even at 20 feet, fire trucks and engines have to drive slightly into the oncoming lane of traffic when turning onto narrow streets, potentially causing a safety hazard… (more)

We need to follow state guidelines and keep the wide streets that accommodate everyone. How is making the streets more narrow making us safer? We need a new Muni management that isn’t intent on changing the world, just getting people where they need to go. The world is changing and they are not changing with it. They are trying to force their theories down our throats.

May SFMTA Meetings – Come tell the Board what you want them to do.

May-meetings

SFMTA Board Meetings at City Hall Room 400, 1 PM
This month – May 3 and May 17

FYI: What SFMTA staff CAN and CANNOT do without Board approval:

What CAN this SFMTA staff group do?
The Staff: It appears all they can really do is recommend actions to the Board.
They CAN change the timing on the traffic signals and they MAY change some color curbs up to 20 feet long without a MTA Board hearing.

What MUST the Board do?
SFMTA Board MUST approve removal of: stop signs, no left turns, bus zones, blue zones, towing no parking and stopping signs, and required right turns. All of these changes take place at the SFMTA Board meetings. That is why we are taking our issues to the SFMTA Board meeting.

What CAN the Supervisors do?
Supervisors can do a lot if 8 or them agree to make the change.
A Supervisor may be able to do something about enforcement.

We  asked about enforcement for the Mission Street project:
SFMTA enforces double parking.
PCO who directs traffic at forced right turn on Cesar Chavez.
SFMTA enforces protection for street painters.
Police Department handles the rest of the enforcement. A Supervisor may be able to do something about enforcement.

San Francisco’s Residential Parking Permit Program Wants to Hear from You – 11 Community Workshops Scheduled For May & June 2016

San Francisco’s Residential Parking Permit Program Wants to Hear from You – 11 Community Workshops Scheduled For May & June 2016

You are subscribed to The Residential Permit Parking Evaluation & Reform Project for San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA).

SFMTA Parking Update

San Francisco’s Residential Parking Permit Program Wants to Hear from You
11 Community Workshops Scheduled For May & June 2016

The SFMTA is seeking public engagement and input to update and improve San Francisco’s Residential Parking Permit program. The program has been largely unchanged for 40 years, even as San Francisco has changed considerably. The SFMTA is seeking to update the program, align it with the city’s transportation goals and policies, and improve customer service for permit holders.

Eleven community workshops in each of the eleven supervisorial districts are scheduled for May and June 2016, to report final results from a recent citywide survey, research findings, discuss preliminary policy reform options and solicit public recommendations for program improvement. The public is invited to attend. Please come and attend one or all to share your ideas and/or provide input.

RPPMeetings.jpg

About San Francisco’s Residential Permit Parking Program

The SFMTA is undertaking a comprehensive, data-driven evaluation of the Residential Permit Parking program. The evaluation includes data on existing trends and a citywide survey on residential parking. The completed program evaluation, including recommendations for program reform, will be presented to the SFMTA Board of Directors in fall 2016.

For more information about the Residential Parking Permit Evaluation & Reform Project visit:
https://www.sfmta.com/projects-planning/projects/residential-parking-permit-evaluation-reform-project or email InfoRPP@sfmta.com

Come and let your voice be heard!

Citizen group votes to abolish illegal church parking near Dolores Park

By Joe : sfexaminer – excerpt

Illegal parking for churchgoers on the streets near Dolores Park must go.

So says a citizen advisory group convened by the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency to address parking concerns created by churchgoers on Dolores and Guerrero streets in the Mission district.

For decades, weekend churchgoers illegally parked their vehicles along medians on Dolores and Guerrero streets, blocking the middle of the street. But the vehicles were not regularly ticketed, which neighbors have complained amounts to a de-facto “turn the other cheek” from city officials.

In response to neighbors’ concerns, the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency convened a group of citizens, from church representatives to secular neighbors, to settle the issue.

Now the Dolores/Guerrero Median Parking Advisory Committee has spoken: a vote by the Dolores/Guerrero Median Parking Advisory Committee on Thursday morning recommended parking along road medians on Guerrero and Dolores be abolished.

The decision is not final, but is instead a proposal SFMTA staff will present to its Board of Directors in about three months, said John Knox White of the SFMTA.

SFMTA staff may also submit a proposal separate from that of the citizen group, Knox White said.

Still, the citizen group’s proposal to abolish median parking could impact that final vote… (more)

As the SFMTA city authorities squeeze the parking out of San Francisco more people will feel the pinch and stay away. Getting rid of the churches, and other charitable organizations who serve the less advantaged citizens will put more disadvantaged people at risk. This is part of the plan to rid the city of undesirables. A church is not required to serve the gods of greed.